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Trailer skid or rollers

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  • bhawes
    replied
    I added the guides on the back end of the bunks 3 years ago and wonder why I didn't do it 30 years ago! They are vertical roller guides and are only about 18" high. I back the trailer into the water until the the top 2"of the roller is above the water line and then drive or hand line the boat onto the trailer. Perfect, centered loading every time.

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  • Sunbird
    replied
    All the points you mention are valid. I guess in the end there are two considerations. What is best for the boat and what is best for launching the boat.Properly adjusted. -bunk trailers support the boat under the stringers which are the strongest part of the hull. Rollers are point loading and cause many hull issues as pointed out earlier. If you want to use a bunk trailer in low tide conditions I would use a hitch extension to get the trailer farther back. Or have a trailer built with an extra long tongue. Most trailer boats spend a higher percentage of their life on the trailer then in the water so for this reason alone bunks make more sense. I have never seen any rack storage facilities that use rollers- always bunks- go figure. Just my opinion.........

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  • Dadrock33
    replied
    ALWAYS WET THE BUNK CARPETING BEFORE TRYING TO LOAD YOUR BOAT, . . boat will slide up easier . . . or get the plastic strips attached and get the best of both worlds. My Seahawk trailer was what they called a pole trailer (there was an adjustable 4" X 4" steel box beam used as the tongue) and it worked perfectly on short and low angle launching ramps (for my 2452). When I purchased my equalizer hitch (recommended for surge braking trailers), there was an option for those types of pole trailers and I got one. Made a world of difference in towing the boat and making things easier of the ole' man.

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  • 88fourwinns
    replied
    There is actually are reasons for roller trailers to predominate, as they do where I am on the North Shore of Long Island...
    if you are located where there are:
    wide tidal swings from high to low tide ( here the water depth changes 7-8 feet from high to low)
    shallow ramps

    if you have a bunk trailer, then you will wind up either putting the rear tires/axle/exhaust system of your tow vehicle into salt water to launch/retrieve at low tide on a bunk trailer. My local ramp would be un-usable much of the time (only good around an hr before/after high tide) with a bunk trailer.
    on the South Shore of LI the tidal swings are much less, so you see more bunk trailers there.

    Here its about 85% rollers for a good reason...and if you maintain them (just takes a bit of grease, & anti corrosion spray) they last a long time. Wood bunks eventually rot also. Not centering is usually a result of putting the trailer in too deep.

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  • Island Eddie
    replied
    I wonder if it has to do with the fact their continent is upside down?

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  • bobofthenorth
    replied
    You've already got the roller trailer so the discussion is moot but this is another vote for bunks. I've had both and I'd never have another roller trailer if you gave it to me. They're a PITA to load and they put localized pressure on the hull. Bunks are dead simple, idiot proof for loading and they spread the load out over a large area of the hull.

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  • Bayman
    replied
    To help pulling up your boat with bunks; before loading your boat onto your trailer, back it far enough so your bunks are totally submerged in the water. Then, pull out to your normal loading position. The bunks will be wet and thereby easier to slide the boat on.

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  • Floaty_Prime
    replied
    I would look into swapping out for bunks. I have rollers on my small 14 1/2' and UHMW bunks on my 192 and the bigger boat is so much easier to handle while loading and dead solid while trailering. A good bunk kit should be pretty reasonable in price.

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  • Centerline2
    replied
    Originally posted by Davidlyne View Post
    Boat is now home on its new roller trailer. It appears that bunks are an "American" thing. None of the Australian trailer manufacturers recommended Bunks under a F/G boat.Thanks for the replies
    its not so much an "american thing" as it is an "experience thing".... back in the 70's and 80's, roller bunks were all the rage here. it was difficult to find a boat trailer without them, but after several years of experience with them, they faded from favor, as the new bunk design (as opposed to the bunk design BEFORE the rollers) are so much better....

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  • Davidlyne
    replied
    Boat is now home on its new roller trailer. It appears that bunks are an "American" thing. None of the Australian trailer manufacturers recommended Bunks under a F/G boat.Thanks for the replies

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Originally posted by oakplank View Post
    I heard that rollers will eventually leave dimples on the hull where they meet the boat. With bunks, the weight of the boat is better distributed. Just back the trailer deep enough for the boat to float as far as possible instead of working your a** off “pulling the boat up the bunks.
    Yep, float in off and most of the way on. Just do a little cranking when I retrieve mine.

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  • oakplank
    replied
    I heard that rollers will eventually leave dimples on the hull where they meet the boat. With bunks, the weight of the boat is better distributed. Just back the trailer deep enough for the boat to float as far as possible instead of working your a** off “pulling the boat up the bunks.

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  • Waterdowg
    replied
    I have had both types of trailers. I prefer the bunks over the rollers.

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  • driz
    replied
    Bunks are thing but 2x wood covered in fabric as opposed to a system. They all work you have to admit HOW MUCH CAN GO WRONG WITH A PIECE OF WOOD?. Quoting the Old Sarge here, “ keep it simple stupid”. My bunks are. 28 years old and till going strong. The only down side I know of is they are a bit heavier pulling when cranking the boat up but they’re no that bad.

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  • Davidlyne
    replied
    Thanks for the replies

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