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    Capri flooring

    Probably an old story to most of you, but newby boat owner here with a project boat.

    So I traded a couple of sea-doos for a 1988 Bayliner Capri, (selling price was only $500.00, to begin with). My biggest concern was a clear title and a sound hull. Clear title is good, not sure about anything else as of yet. She has the 2.3 SOHC in her and the OMC outdrive. That out of the way.

    I do know the floor and all seating and side cushions are going to have to be replaced. My question is, and forgive me if I use the wrong terms, but the dash pedestals, driver and passenger sides, are they build from the subfloor up, or from the floor up?

    Has anyone here redone a Capri (or similar model) and taken photos of the project? Id love to see what I'm getting into before I get into it.

    The carpentry work doesn't scare me (just like to have information beforehand) and I'm an electrician and mechanic by trade so those are covered.


    Thank you in advance for your time and knowledge.


    I can be emailed at swilson@lift-strong.com
    ​​​​​​​Click image for larger version

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    #2
    Replacing the deck is pretty common because, IMO, owners don’t keep the carpet dry and that allows water to seep into the plywood. Same with the seat frames and upholstery backers. Kind of like leaving a convertible out in the weather with the top down. It’s all fixable, and done correctly can last a long time. Use marine grade fir plywood , cut it to fit then soak it in 50/50 acetone and catalized resin, multiple coats until. It won’t take anymore. Glass it in and do not use stainless steel fasteners where they will be completely sealed. Bronze is better in that situation. Stainless needs to be exposed to the air at least a little bit otherwise it rots. Check the transom, especially around the drain plug. If the wood is soft replace it. If it’s good, coat the heck out of the area with 4200 and maybe a chunk of pvc tube leading to the drain. If you have to replace the transom plywood, do the same thing around the drain and soak and glass drive cutout. Be sure to bed all of your fasteners in a product like 4200 or boatlife caulk, but do not use silicone. It’s the wrong product in this case.
    Invest in an oscillating tool. They are awesome at this kind of stuff.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

    Comment


      #3
      Been there, done that.

      Definitely get the oscillating tool - it is a invaluable for this kind of work.
      I have done a couple of Bayliners on a tight budget. My goal was to make them as good as or better than new.
      Unfortunately for many Bayliners that is not always a high bar.
      I have been using ACX or BCX plywood for the floor without problems. This is what Bayliner used as I can clearly see voids and knot holes in the floors I have pulled up.
      It is a lot cheaper than the marine plywood. Bayliner floors are usually not sealed on the underside. I coat them with thinned out fiberglass resin just as described before. Usually 1 coat thin and 1 coat standard is all I do.

      Transom and stringers are a bit more difficult. When replacing the transom I would recommend using the actual marine plywood to avoid the voids in the material.
      Stringers can pretty much any wood as long as you give them a coat of thinned resin similar to the plywood floor. Typically the original stringers were just wrapped in fiberglas and not actually coated.
      I like to use Cedar just because it is light, strong and rot resistant.

      In regards to the seat pedestals, they are sitting straight on the floor. There is no connecting down below the floor.
      I will attach some pictures in another post showing one of my projects.

      Comment


        #4

        Comment


          #5
          Yellow, aka Alaska cedar for stringers. Seal any and all penetration with bedding compound. If you have gaps that will be covered, fill them with Thickso, it’s a mixture of resin and glass.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
          MMSI 367770440
          1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
          Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

          Comment


            #6
            This is a 2000 Capri. Does anyone know how these seat frames are attached? The flooring seems to be sturdy under them so I am thinking about not messing with them at all. All of the wood around the sea locker and by the back seats was really bad.

            Comment


              #7
              It appears that they are glassed in. If you look carefully there’s a strip about four inches wide, two inches on the deck, two on the seat frame. This is where one of those oscillating tools really shines. You can get right down flat with the deck and cut the glass without cutting the seat frame. You are going to have a better end product if you replace the whole deck, and it will probably be easier.
              P/C Pete
              Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
              1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
              Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
              1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
              MMSI 367770440
              1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
              Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you - that makes sense. Heading out to get the oscillating tool this morning. Should I look for one of those saw tooth attachments and cut them out that way?

                Comment


                  #9
                  There are a couple you could use, a flat tooth, a 200 degree type and a hook type although it’s intended for drywall. You can tease a plunge through the glass and get into the radius between the deck and the seat box with the non hook types. Take your time, I try to have a shop vac hose a few inches away to gather the dust right away. Keeps the itching down too.
                  P/C Pete
                  Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                  1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                  Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                  1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                  MMSI 367770440
                  1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                  Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Too late on the itching . We spent a few hours today with the oscillator taking out the seat boxes. There is a panel in front of the transom, pulled that out, although I don't know how we are going to get the replacement in there without seriously bending it. It looks like the padding on the sides is tricky to get out. Moving forward things are going to have a lot less straight edges. Was thinking a dremel to remove that part of the floor, and we ruined two blades so far. Any thoughts? Will that fuel tank lift straight out?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      A dremel works real well to cut some of those real tight places. Mine is getting so worn out I usually have to give it a spin after turning it on. Where are you concerned about having to do some bending to get the deck in? Btw, have you checked the transom real well?
                      P/C Pete
                      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                      1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                      MMSI 367770440
                      1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                      Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Not bending on the deck, bending on the panel that sits about a foot in front of the transom it is parallel with the transom. It sits in front of the battery, front of the anchor light etc. We haven't got as far back as the transom yet with the decking but getting within 2 feet. The wood so far isn't great, but not sure we want to go all the way back. The deck back there doesn't support any weight on the starboard side, port side it needs to hold up the battery.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Check out my post new member... I just completely redid my whole boat last year.... I just finished doing a complete engine rebuild over the winter cause I blew the head gasket , pistons, bearings and all gaskets
                          1990 Capri cuddy 2072

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Alan_Lloys and Jonesy, I found your photos of the under-deck area very enlightening. I've owned a 1986 19.5' Capri with VP AQ131/275 since it was new. The boat has only been used in fresh water (Lake Tahoe) and we have always been scrupulous about draining/drying out after every use, as well as storing covered and under a canopy during the off-season to prevent rain damage. Consequently, the floor, transom, etc. are solid. I've always wondered about the under-tank area however. I was concerned that there might have been foam sprayed in under the aluminum tank when it was installed, which could cause corrosion over time if the foam were to remain wet. Your pic's however, indicate that there was no foam installed under the tank. Am I correct about this?? Thanks for the excellent descriptive pic's.
                            1986 Capri 1950 Cuddy
                            AQ131A / 275
                            (original owner)

                            Comment


                            • Jonesy
                              Jonesy commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I didn't take my tank out. It appears to be plastic. Water flows freely under the tank, so I don't think there is too much underneath there. I was wondering if I could just lift the tank straight up. I would imagine it may have something keeping in from sliding around but I don't know.

                            #15
                            Glad to be able to help.
                            I had to sign up again with the change on the forum but if you search you may find more of my pictures.

                            You are correct on the foam. It is only on the sides of the boat and in the two boxes on the outside by the engine.

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