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New 2012 175BR owner checking in-gctid401962

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    New 2012 175BR owner checking in-gctid401962

    Seen a few other posts on here from owners of new 2012 175BR's so I figured I'd add my $.02 and share my experiences with the group on a 2012 175 BR that I purchased in late June. Overall I'm happy with the boat, but as with any major purchase, there are some things that I wish happened differently.

    I'm not new to boating; grew up boating on grandfather's Startcraft holiday 14 with and after he passed, continued boating in it with my father & brother.

    When the wife & I were dating and during our 1st few years of marriage we keep boating, then the kids can along and changed everything. Girls are now 10 & 14 and we're getting back into the boating scene, and because of it's size / age the old starcraft just doesn't cut the mustard.

    For the past few years been doing a lot of looking at used boats, but because the family owns a boathouse on Canandaigua Lake (Finger Lakes, NY) we were limited to an overall length of less than 20ft.

    We pretty much had locked into a dealer who had (2) 2009 Maxium 1800's ($17,500) and a 2009 Sea Ray 175 ($20K). I'd done a bunch of research on the boats, including hunting done previous owners, as all had been taken in on trade. One Saturday we were getting ready to start doing some sea trials, when the Maxium we were leaning towards got purchased by a young couple who walked in off the street and put a down payment on a credit card (found out later they couldn't cut the financing, so last I knew boat was still on the lot). Because of that, my wife jokingly asked the salesman if he could give us the other Maximum for the cost of a 170 BR parked on the showroom floor. That opened up a whole new round of discussions, and that lead us to end up purchasing a 2012 175BR for $ 19,000 (before Factory Rebate) plus tax & dealers fees, etc. I did pay an extra 750 for an additional 4 years of warranty through the financing company.

    The Boat has the 3 liter Mercruiser TKS attached to an Alpha 1 outdrive, extended factory swim platform, factory Jensen AM/FM stereo with the Ipod adapter (also wired for satellite and additional speakers), hull side storage nets, Full carpeting, bow / cockpit covers, Bimini top and Karavan trailer.

    Waiting to get some work done on the boathouse, so until then we've been trailering it. So far no boo-boo's at the ramp, but have seen some interesting things. Never thought I would be trailering a boat this much, but she pulls easy, and we're actually looking to hit a few other of the Finger Lakes this season, and even talking of some longer trips next year with her. The wife and kids have the launch / retrieve routine down pretty good, so that makes a huge difference.

    The bad:

    Gauges. I've already installed an hour meter, I see that the engine is wired for oil, temp & trim (but don't appear to be extended to helm) I'm thinking this winter I'll be adding some multi-gauges. This is my first stern drive, and with the swim platform, it's impossible to tell if outdrive is trimmed. Because of the location of our boathouse and other shallow water areas I travel, really want to know where it's trimmed at. Gas gauge is also questionable, seems to flutter a lot, and not give a true reading.

    Helm seat: I'm 6'. The Maximums had bolsters... makes a huge difference in visibility.

    Lack of Bow Cleats for anchoring; seems to always get turned sideways in the wind because only cleat to anchor with is mid-ship.

    Slow speed handling: It's a shallow V, so she does wander around some.

    Dealer used the boat on the show rounds during the spring. There was a stain on the carpet that wouldn't come out, but not very noticeable; it helped with the price.

    Slight step going forward past helm to bow seats: It's not a toe stubber, but just enough to catch the bottom of the foot as you step across it.

    Trailer issues:

    Swing-away hitch was "backwards", it was set-up to swing towards the trailer jack; by reversing the position of the bolts and pin, I set mine up to swing the other direction, so that it folds flush against the trailer frame. Also not impressed with the poly wheel fenders, once they get a few years of life on them, I have a feeling they're gonna break if someone uses them as a step.

    The Good:

    Swim platform is awesome. No worries about kicking the stern drive, and it makes getting in and out of the water so much easier. Right side rear seat cushion is removable, making an easy step and keeping footprints off the vinyl.

    New style engine cover. Great for coolers or tackle box. Just need to remind kids that it's not a step. There is some engine noise, but never having an I/O I have nothing to compare it too.

    Snappy with 4 of us on board. Quick to come up to plane; it's not Grandpa's old tinny.

    Upgrades that are on the list: Fish finder/sounder, dual batteries, install a Skeg Pro, LED courtesy lights, and install a cleat or 2 up front for anchoring. A bigger project that I'm thinking about (from another post on this board) is a carpeted deck that I can drop into the bow with a base for a trolling motor and pedestal seat. Would like to eventually set-up some type of removable frame for down riggers and a copper reel (been a long time since I last "pulled copper").

    Couple of questions for others who have purchased new boats recently and their experiences with the dealer and information / equipment offered :

    Safety equipment: Did boat come equipped ? or were you on your own ? Any "help" or suggestions on what was needed ?

    Trailing info : Any lessons/tips ? Advise on launching/retrieving ? Transom straps? Spare tires? Hitches ? Wiring adapter ?

    #2
    Congrats! And welcome!

    Te only input I really have is that I ha to purchase my own safety gear, don't forget a fire extinguisher a distress flag and a whistle. Seems not many folks carry those items.

    Happy boating!

    Comment


      #3
      Welcome to the BOC! In addition to what Jason mentioned above, you need PFDs (life jackets) for each person on board, and children under 13 (I think everywhere) must wear a PFD when the boat is underway. Also, you need a throw cushion, usually square and white, sometimes orange. I would buy 4 standard orange PFDs to stow on the boat, for extra passengers, and buy 4 good fitting ski jacket PFDs for you and your family. I believe a paddle is also required, I carry a combo paddle/boathook. Boat dealers I've dealt with have always provided these things (except ski jackets) as well as 4 dock lines, 4 fenders, and an anchor package. This is all the bare minimum equipment you should have, IMO.

      In addition, I recommend a hand-held VHF radio, a BoatUS or SeaTow membership, and most importantly, take a safety class, from your state game and fish, USCG auxiliary or US Power Squadron. It will make you a safer, more knowledgeable boater, and you will almost certainly get a discount on your insurance. It's usually a one day class, and if possible, take the whole family.

      Finally, a couple of tips. When I see new boaters struggling to load the boat onto the trailer, I kindly remind them that the boat steers from the rear, not the front, like a car. Instant improvement! And as fellow BOC member SeaPuppy likes to say, "never approach the dock faster than you're willing to hit it." (He's currently under the weather, your thoughts and prayers appreciated.) Enjoy your new boat!
      Jeff & Tara (And Ginger too)
      Lake Havasu City, AZ
      |
      Current: 2008 Playcraft 2400 MCM 350 Mag B3
      2000 Bayliner 3388 Cummins 4bta 250s (SOLD 2020)
      2000 Bayliner 2858 MCM 7.4 MPI B3 (SOLD 2018)
      2007 Bayliner 305 MCM twin 350 Mag B3s (SOLD 2012)
      2008 Bayliner 289 MCM 350 Mag Sea Core B3 (SOLD 2009)
      And 12 others...
      In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. 7-2-10

      Comment


        #4
        Welcome aboard, I myself am relatively new to boating, and this site has an unbelievable wealth of assistance / guidance / tips / techniques etc, and the folks here are awesome! I actually became a member before getting a boat, though I leaned towards Bayliner (2011 175 BR).

        As for the safety gear, my dealer had a runabout package that included the 4 lifejackets, fire extinguisher, anchor and line, 3 fenders, 2 dock lines, 2 paddles, and a small bucket that had the safety gear (the bucket has a floating flash light, throw line, and it acts as a manual bailer), the dealer's blow out price $300 (but I negotiated to have it included when I purchased my boat). As said earlier, you may want to get a set of day/night flares (may not be needed where you boat, but from a safety / survival aspect, a great thing to have).

        Not sure if Bayliner improved the cup holders mounted on the engine compartment, just lost one of mine on the water Friday, so I am (as was recommended from members here) going to silicone the other one in more firmly and look at getting another one to replace the lost one.

        As for launching, if you have a system, keep using it (if it means making a check list, then make one). Lately, I have forgotten to remove the transom straps when launching, a pita for sure, but no real biggie! I launch by myself quite often (unless a 5 and 3 year old are considered good assistants!), first thing I do when pulling into the staging area is tighten the drain plug and pull off the transom tie downs (if I remember!). Next, I put my fenders and two dock lines on (the 2011 has two cleats, one at the bow, the other at the stern, so I tied one midship from the hand rail). Then I release the bow safety chain, loosen the winch strap, and disconnect the trailer wires. I then back the trailer down the ramp until the tops of the trailer fenders are just above the water, I park the truck, get out, start to shove the boat off the trailer, disconnect the winch strap and grap the front dock line as I hop into the boat (or if close enough to the dock, just walk along the dock with the boat floating back). I tie the front and back up to the dock, flip the blower on, then go and park the truck. By the time I get back to the boat, load the kids, and get ready to start the boat, the blower's been on long enough (recommended 4 minutes). For retrieving, pretty much reverse the launch sequence!

        Enjoy the ride!

        Comment


          #5
          jeffw wrote:
          Welcome to the BOC! In addition to what Jason mentioned above, you need PFDs (life jackets) for each person on board, and children under 13 (I think everywhere) must wear a PFD when the boat is underway. Also, you need a throw cushion, usually square and white, sometimes orange. I would buy 4 standard orange PFDs to stow on the boat, for extra passengers, and buy 4 good fitting ski jacket PFDs for you and your family. I believe a paddle is also required, I carry a combo paddle/boathook. Boat dealers I've dealt with have always provided these things (except ski jackets) as well as 4 dock lines, 4 fenders, and an anchor package. This is all the bare minimum equipment you should have, IMO.

          In addition, I recommend a hand-held VHF radio, a BoatUS or SeaTow membership, and most importantly, take a safety class, from your state game and fish, USCG auxiliary or US Power Squadron. It will make you a safer, more knowledgeable boater, and you will almost certainly get a discount on your insurance. It's usually a one day class, and if possible, take the whole family.

          Finally, a couple of tips. When I see new boaters struggling to load the boat onto the trailer, I kindly remind them that the boat steers from the rear, not the front, like a car. Instant improvement! And as fellow BOC member SeaPuppy likes to say, "never approach the dock faster than you're willing to hit it." (He's currently under the weather, your thoughts and prayers appreciated.) Enjoy your new boat!
          Well said, I was on my phone last night, this site doesn't have a mobile version so I was keeping my reply brief.

          The only thing I can add is that the USCG Aux will provide a "vessel safety check" in which an Aux CG member will come to your house and go over your safety equipment with you, and provide you with some safety tips to boot. There is no repercussions for failing, you simply correct the findings and they come back, and you eventually pass.

          I've been boating all my life since before I can remember, after purchasing my first boat I took a boaters safety course and it, still to this day, was the most significant thing I have done.

          Just recently I figured that since my boat is on it's 7th season that I "should" keep spare fuses and bulbs on board (don't wait as long as I did (stupid stupid stupid)). So I bought a Plano waterproof small tackle box thing and loaded it up with spare nav light bulbs, stern light bulbs, trailer bulbs, and a few of each type of fuse on board.

          Comment


            #6
            Extra Fuses - Good idea, looking around the boat, they used a combination of ATO and mini fuses. Too bad they couldn't standardize on one type; would cut-down on the amount of extras needed.

            I was honestly quite surprised that a new boat doesn't come with any safety equipment as standard, and for that matter, the salesman didn't really talk to much about needs either... Maybe because I am a current boat owner, he didn't feel it was necessary ? We did end up purchasing a package (at the "new boat owners" discount) that contained 4 Orange PFD's, anchor/chain/rope, fenders, fire extinguisher, dock lines, throw cushion, extra rope, oar, hand help air horn, flares, and some other stuff. Between the new equipment and existing stuff, I've got a good collection to choose from.

            Trailer information from the dealer was less then ideal.... No transom straps; salesman said "Boat is heavy enough that it'll ride good on the trailer with 'em"... I ended up purchasing a set before pulling out of the parking lot. He provided no real instructions / help on loading or launching, or even just basics on how to trailer and what to expect when trailers. Again, being an experienced boater, maybe they felt I didn't need the information, but I can see where a first time boat owner could really get themselves in trouble without some help and guidance.

            As the hours add up on the boat, no major issues encountered yet. But looking at a few other improvements and updates. I am planning on getting the family into a boater safety class. I did take one years ago, but will attend with them to refresh my memory and to set an example that it's always a good idea to keep up to date on the safety information.

            Comment

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