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New 2012 Bayliner 185 - First impressions-gctid397850

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    New 2012 Bayliner 185 - First impressions-gctid397850

    I took delivery on a new 2012 Bayliner 185 a week ago. It has a 3 liter Mercruiser TKS engine with the usual Alpha 1 Gen 2 outdrive. Full set of Faria gauges, and I had an hour meter and Humminbird depth finder added. Bimini cover, and swim platform on the back, Jensen AM/FM stereo with Ipod adapter. Came with a bow and cockpit cover as well.

    Hull feels solid; and it looks like (at least where you can see the inner surface of the hull) they really went to town on covering every surface with sealant. The seams on those parts of the hull that were sealed with silicon sealant were not done very well. Rather sloppy, I thought.

    The TKS feature on the Mercruiser engine did not work the first time I got the boat wet. Presumably this TKS (Turn Key System, something Mercury came up with for their carburetor-equipped engines) precludes your having to choke or stroke the throttle to start the engine. There is no choke that I could see, but the throttle sure took a lot of pumping before it would start. Fortunately since that time, the engine has started more or less as advertised, although it idles very rough.

    The speedometer has never worked. The tube that connects the speedo to the outdrive is connected securely at both ends. The three right hand gauges, fuel, trim and oil pressure, fog up almost to the point of unreadability as soon as the boat goes in the water. This is by no means my first boat, and I have never seen this before. I even called the manufacturer, Faria, and was just told the gauges have weep holes for letting moisture out, but no explanation as to why they are fogging up, and why just those three. The fogging does tend to clear up somewhat after a while.

    The boat has a very definite pull to the left. Undoubtedly the trim tab needs adjusting, but I've never had one pull this bad before. Aside from that the boat handles well, with a decent hole shot. I'm still in the break-in period so I've not just firewalled it just yet.

    The boat wallows like a pig at idle speed, but I think this is a combination of the trim tab being out of adjustment and my overcorrecting on my steering.

    Guess I'm still getting used to it... Any comments, suggestions, questions, would be appreciated.

    Thanks.

    #2
    The 3.0L is pretty lean from the factory and if you use E10 like I do then the lean ness is even more pronounced. When I got mine I had start and idle issues until I had the idle mixture adjusted to richen the mixture up - worked great ever since.

    Comment


      #3
      My 175 pulls hard left until I get it trimmed. Knowing this is not your 1st boat I can assume that is not it but you never know.

      Comment


        #4
        Before yesterdays trip my admiral wanted me to buy a new boat (no more since yesterday, see Drive fin, reverse testing).

        I looked at new Bayliners and wasn't impressed with the workmanship I found. The "big things" are done OK but all the details are lacking big time! I looked into 6 boats from 17 to 19ft and none of them were done well. Sure, Bayliners are by far the most boat for the buck but I am sure that all buyers wouldn't mind to pay an extra $200-300 to have caulking done right, screws straight in instead of angled and parts fit the way they were supposed to go in to name just a few.

        It might even be better if they would sell them as kits as it's easier to do it right the first time than re-working the flaws :tinhat

        I'm pretty sure that my next boat wouldn't have been a Bayliner if the last trip wouldn't have changed the admirals mind and I am no longer in the market. Sure, a better boat would have been at least 25% more expensive. It's a pity Bayliners are great designs and we can only hope that they somehow find a way to introduce a brand new concept: quality control.

        Comment


          #5
          kjs wrote:
          Before yesterdays trip my admiral wanted me to buy a new boat (no more since yesterday, see Drive fin, reverse testing).

          I looked at new Bayliners and wasn't impressed with the workmanship I found. The "big things" are done OK but all the details are lacking big time! I looked into 6 boats from 17 to 19ft and none of them were done well. Sure, Bayliners are by far the most boat for the buck but I am sure that all buyers wouldn't mind to pay an extra $200-300 to have caulking done right, screws straight in instead of angled and parts fit the way they were supposed to go in to name just a few.

          It might even be better if they would sell them as kits as it's easier to do it right the first time than re-working the flaws :tinhat

          I'm pretty sure that my next boat wouldn't have been a Bayliner if the last trip wouldn't have changed the admirals mind and I am no longer in the market. Sure, a better boat would have been at least 25% more expensive. It's a pity Bayliners are great designs and we can only hope that they somehow find a way to introduce a brand new concept: quality control.
          I would love to know what boat I can buy that is only $200-$300 more than my 175 and better? I agree, the fine details are not there but the big things are done right. When I bought my 175, the next best thing was several thousand difference, the difference of me having or not having a new boat. 4 years later, still going strong.

          Comment


            #6
            I meant if Bayliner would raise their prices by $200-300 and deliver a lot less flaws buyers would be willing to pay it. You spend that much just for gas to get the new boat to where it should have been to start with (back and forth from the dealer). And at the bottom line it must be terribly expensive for Bayliner to pay their dealers for all these quality repairs!

            My 16 year old 175 is running still strong but most likely it has a lot less hours than yours...... (46 since yesterday, 15 from us).

            Comment


              #7
              If the carburetor bowl is empty or evaporatated, it will not start first time.

              If you let the boat sit several days ..... As above.

              Don't pump anything.

              Turn the key over 3 times and that will prime automatically the electronic TKS module.

              It should start on the third or fourth go.

              If I let mine sit 2 days, it will start first time. Any longer than that and it is the 3 turn proceedure.

              Once started, you are good all day with one turn of the key.

              Mine is the 4.3 Litre '09

              Comment


                #8
                kjs wrote:
                I meant if Bayliner would raise their prices by $200-300 and deliver a lot less flaws buyers would be willing to pay it. You spend that much just for gas to get the new boat to where it should have been to start with (back and forth from the dealer). And at the bottom line it must be terribly expensive for Bayliner to pay their dealers for all these quality repairs!

                My 16 year old 175 is running still strong but most likely it has a lot less hours than yours...... (46 since yesterday, 15 from us).
                Agreed. 1k more is not over the top for this price point. I currently have 70 hours, all mine. Boat runs strong and has held up BUT I am very particular when it comes to my toys and put in the effort regarding maintenance and preventive maintenance.

                Comment


                  #9
                  kjs wrote:


                  My 16 year old 175 is running still strong but most likely it has a lot less hours than yours...... (46 since yesterday, 15 from us).
                  46 hours total in 16 years? Wow, we put on more than that per year

                  Comment


                    #10
                    yep, 1st owner bought her on a boat show and put her into dry storage for 13 years (according to nephew he liked the sales girl and has more money than brain). Then he donated her to his nephew who ran her for 1.5 seasons. He ran out of money and sold her with 31h on the clock to us. For job reasons I didn't have much time to take her out the last 1.5 seasons we owned her which fortunately changed this year. Already put more than 12h on her this year which is a lot for our small lake.

                    When I had oil and impeller change done this spring she still had original 1996 oil filter, spark plugs and impeller.........

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The slow speed wandering is a big problem with these hulls. I hate it and from what I have read here the simple fix is Smart Tabs.

                      Your speedo not working could be a blocked sender hole. Have a look at the front of the leg, you will see a small hole, make sure this is clean from paint etc. once you have done this from the outside take the tube off and blow it back to clear any blockages.

                      The other way is take it back to the dealer to fix. New boat should have these issues.

                      Can't help with the pulling to the left sorry, it might be the trim, take a spanner with you next time and have a play with the settings on the tab.

                      Happy boating

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Macca wrote:
                        The slow speed wandering is a big problem with these hulls.
                        This is a problem? What's the problem? It's a boat- not an F1 car!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I noticed a lot of small things that really bugged me about the finish of my 185 br also. Why can't Bayliner hire a quality control guy who isn't from Mexico to do a once over before they ship em north to the US and Canada. I could have cared less if I had to pay an extra 1000 bucks to not see the small details of poor workamanship that surfaced after I had combed over the boat with a little more time.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Bcbayliner wrote:
                            I noticed a lot of small things that really bugged me about the finish of my 185 br also. Why can't Bayliner hire a quality control guy who isn't from Mexico to do a once over before they ship em north to the US and Canada. I could have cared less if I had to pay an extra 1000 bucks to not see the small details of poor workamanship that surfaced after I had combed over the boat with a little more time.
                            Now we can only hope that they read this board and DO something! I'd say it doesn't matter where the quality guy is from as long as there is one. Have seen pretty good quality from down there too.

                            As I wrote before, I wouldn't have bought a new Bayliner just because of all these flaws and I was really close to spend money on "pressure" from the admiral. She always wants to spend money for my hobbies! The alternatives would have been a lot more expensive but the workmanship was far superior. They have to cut things to reach the price point (like minimal instruments and zarmak cleats) but workmanship should still be good no matter what. If I see such flaws I always wonder what other bad things I didn't see.....

                            Comment


                              #15
                              vtx531 wrote:
                              This is a problem? What's the problem? It's a boat- not an F1 car!
                              Not being able to go in a straigth line is a problem. You have to have constant inputs in the streering to keep on course and slow speed.

                              Don't know where you get F1 from, the comment wasn't about speed but lack of it!

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