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Overnighting in Cuddy

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    #16
    Guys,
    Thank you !
    It seems that cruising is related to age, flexiblity and how deep you are in love .
    Hm, with 50+ years and XXXX kilos, maybe my children will be first to discover that kind of romantics !

    Happy Eastern to all of you .

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      #17
      Originally posted by RandyR View Post
      Thanks for your reply. When you use a buoy at state parks, is there anything you do to minimize drift? Or just hook up to the buoy?

      Are there limits on where you can anchor overnight? I haven't found anything on the state website (but could be looking in the wrong places too). When you anchor, do you use a single or two off the bow? Or something else?
      just hook up to the buoy and swing with the tide... if you tie to the dock (first come, first serve) which is acceptable in some places, you also have to pay.... BUT, you can anchor almost anywhere OUTSIDE of the normal navigation channel for FREE... so in a cove or backwater area would be fine UNLESS there are signs, or marked on the chart that says "NO ANCHORING"...

      we have always used one anchor, AND a sternline to shore if at all possible,.... we have anchored in small "one boat" coves in the islands, and rather than an actual anchor, we took lines to shore from 4 different angles to stay in one place.
      the small coves are fun, but if you dont secure the boat well, you WILL swing into the rocks

      small boat camping is a great way to cruise on a budget.


      NU LIBERTE'
      Salem, OR

      1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
      5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
      N2K equipped throughout..
      2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
      2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
      '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
      Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Centerline2 View Post

        just hook up to the buoy and swing with the tide... if you tie to the dock (first come, first serve) which is acceptable in some places, you also have to pay.... BUT, you can anchor almost anywhere OUTSIDE of the normal navigation channel for FREE... so in a cove or backwater area would be fine UNLESS there are signs, or marked on the chart that says "NO ANCHORING"...

        we have always used one anchor, AND a sternline to shore if at all possible,.... we have anchored in small "one boat" coves in the islands, and rather than an actual anchor, we took lines to shore from 4 different angles to stay in one place.
        the small coves are fun, but if you dont secure the boat well, you WILL swing into the rocks

        small boat camping is a great way to cruise on a budget.
        Up here in Washington, you have to pay for the buoys too. The state parks have them and install and maintains them, so they are not free. Also they limit what size boats and how many can tie up to each buoy. I do believe anchoring is free up in Washington, but if you set foot ashore to use bathrooms etc., that might be a different story.
        Esteban
        B-ham!
        Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by green650 View Post
          Up here in Washington, you have to pay for the buoys too. The state parks have them and install and maintains them, so they are not free. Also they limit what size boats and how many can tie up to each buoy. I do believe anchoring is free up in Washington, but if you set foot ashore to use bathrooms etc., that might be a different story.
          yes, the buoys do cost, as well as the dock space, but they dont charge you to anchor, to go ashore or for using the bathrooms.... if you have a way to get ashore without using the dock...


          NU LIBERTE'
          Salem, OR

          1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
          5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
          N2K equipped throughout..
          2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
          2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
          '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
          Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

          Comment


            #20
            Hey cool! I have a 642, basically a later model of your 192. My wife and I, and occasionally a hundred pound chocolate lab, overnighted about six times last year, which is our first year with our new boat. Love it! We have the full camper canvas, sink (13g tank), and a 2.6g Thetford porta potty. We normally stow the potty below during trips, then at night bring it up to the cockpit and make a bed below. Although 2.6g is not really enough for two for a weekend unless it’s midnight relief or emergencies only. Sometimes I empty it into a honey bucket or toilet if I can find one at some point during the excursion. I should mention we drink beer. We hung towels around for privacy. Warm lakes help. This year I plan to acquire a parachute to throw over the Bimini at the dock so we don’t have to suffer installing full camper canvas each night and getting cooked out of bed in the AM. Plus it’s easy midday privacy. We purchased a single burner butane stove for cooking. It’s small! We cooked on the dock. I may try to stow a piece of wood for cooking on and use the swim platform. Scary though. The best setup I’ve heard of with boats like ours is a bracket on the swim platform for a grill, the idea as you know is to keep stray flammable gasses from building up onboard. We stow everything we’d need for a night aboard always, because why not!? I have dual batteries and switch to one of the two for the overnight battery. I have just a proper number/type of tools, fuses, zip ties, duct tape, and bailing wire. I now own a 3/4 guitar which will also be stowed permanently aboard. We installed a keel guard for beaching. We find overnighting is a blast. This year our friends have a similar boat and we’ll be caravanning around. I boat inland lakes in the Spokane area. No tidal worries. Haven’t yet overnighted on the hook. Big chicken, plus I like a good bar nearby. I dig the inflatable dinghy idea. I was a big Westfalia camper guy, so I’m all about organizing just the right amount of stuff to bring aboard. It might be my favorite part, aside from slow runs on calm waters into the sun, after a wonderful meal. You might need a Discover pass for buoys. Best of luck! Report back Jon (rpd)
            It is when you give of yourself that you truly give - Kahlil Gilbran
            2015 Bayliner 642 in Red, 4.3L MPI, Alpha 1 Gen II
            Eagle Runner

            Comment


              #21
              Oops just realized this is an older post! Ugh.
              It is when you give of yourself that you truly give - Kahlil Gilbran
              2015 Bayliner 642 in Red, 4.3L MPI, Alpha 1 Gen II
              Eagle Runner

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by nwboater62 View Post
                Pick up a Waggoner's cruising guide. All the information you need is in that book. State parks, marinas, food and fuel. Your boat will take you to any of the places you would like to go.
                Got the book - hope to put it to use between June and September!
                2010 Bayliner 192 4.3TKS

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by rhythmpoetdonut View Post
                  Hey cool! I have a 642, basically a later model of your 192. My wife and I, and occasionally a hundred pound chocolate lab, overnighted about six times last year, which is our first year with our new boat. Love it! We have the full camper canvas, sink (13g tank), and a 2.6g Thetford porta potty. We normally stow the potty below during trips, then at night bring it up to the cockpit and make a bed below. Although 2.6g is not really enough for two for a weekend unless it’s midnight relief or emergencies only. Sometimes I empty it into a honey bucket or toilet if I can find one at some point during the excursion. I should mention we drink beer. We hung towels around for privacy. Warm lakes help. This year I plan to acquire a parachute to throw over the Bimini at the dock so we don’t have to suffer installing full camper canvas each night and getting cooked out of bed in the AM. Plus it’s easy midday privacy. We purchased a single burner butane stove for cooking. It’s small! We cooked on the dock. I may try to stow a piece of wood for cooking on and use the swim platform. Scary though. The best setup I’ve heard of with boats like ours is a bracket on the swim platform for a grill, the idea as you know is to keep stray flammable gasses from building up onboard. We stow everything we’d need for a night aboard always, because why not!? I have dual batteries and switch to one of the two for the overnight battery. I have just a proper number/type of tools, fuses, zip ties, duct tape, and bailing wire. I now own a 3/4 guitar which will also be stowed permanently aboard. We installed a keel guard for beaching. We find overnighting is a blast. This year our friends have a similar boat and we’ll be caravanning around. I boat inland lakes in the Spokane area. No tidal worries. Haven’t yet overnighted on the hook. Big chicken, plus I like a good bar nearby. I dig the inflatable dinghy idea. I was a big Westfalia camper guy, so I’m all about organizing just the right amount of stuff to bring aboard. It might be my favorite part, aside from slow runs on calm waters into the sun, after a wonderful meal. You might need a Discover pass for buoys. Best of luck! Report back Jon (rpd)
                  May be an old post but it's a topic that's getting attention - thanks for your comments.
                  2010 Bayliner 192 4.3TKS

                  Comment

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