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Overnighting in Cuddy

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    Overnighting in Cuddy

    We have a Bayliner 192 that I'd like to try overnighting in, in Puget Sound. I've been in big boats overnight in California, but never in Puget Sound, and never a boat this size. I've looked at different south Puget Sound state parks but am unsure about what's legal, and what's appropriate. For example, if I use a buoy at a state part, is staying aboard OK? Can I anchor in coves overnight? Does anyone have experience installing a grill in a boat like this? Or is it better to plan on going ashore to picnic?

    If you can point me to any resources I'd appreciate it.
    Last edited by Jim_Gandee; 03-30-2018, 09:02 AM.
    2010 Bayliner 192 4.3TKS

    #2
    I also have a 19' Cuddy. Mine is an 88 Capri 1950 and I am interested in the same thing. We will be moving up to a bit larger boat but not any time soon. I would love to cruise Puget Sound in our Capri. It has the power to easily get us where we want to go so that part is no problem. It will easily cruise at 30 and top at 47. Fast enough for me. I too am interested in using a BBQ on board. I think one that will sit in the pole holder and hang over the side. We would want to tie up to a dock with a rest room available most nights. We live in Vancouver, Wa so most of our boating is on the Columbia River. I bought the boat last May so we didn't try an overnighter on it last summer.
    1988 Capri Cuddy 1950 OMC 5.7

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      #3
      My first boat up here in WA was a Bayliner 1952 cuddy. I believe that is the older version of your boat.

      I slept in it while anchored at Clark and Barnes Island and while tied to a dock near Roche Harbor.

      The state parks, especially if you use a buoy, you have to pay. I didn't have a BBQ mount yet so I used my standard camping stove on the beach. The state parks usually have toilets if you don't have a porta potty in yours.

      I miss that little boat with the 3.0. I got around 4.5 mpg on it.
      Esteban
      Vancouver, BC
      Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

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        #4
        We had a 19' cuddly for 20 years. Did a lot of overnights in it. Most of time it was a least 2 nights. I think our longest trip was 7 days. We also brought our 2 girls with us. When we had the girls with us we tried to get dock spots, which was pretty easy being 19'. We had a full camper canvas made for it, which made this all doable. We did have a BBQ which we stuck in a pole holder. We had a little porta pot that fit up in the v-berth. We anchored out most of the time. We did a lot of modifications to the boat to utilize as much storage as possible. We outfitted it to be able to house our scuba gear as well, but only when it was just the two of us. Our floor in the boat as bad, it gave us the "opportunity" we modify things. One of jumper seats could fold down into a bed or prop us for a lounge. On the starboard side we replaced the jumper seat with just a captains chairs, then added a sink/galley and place for cooler right behind it. The back seats could be moved up to make a big bed/lounge as well. We had a blow up dingy too. We stowed it under the jumper seat.

        Had lots of fun with that boat.
        Pep & Felicia
        1991 3288 150 hino's

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          #5
          I love over nighting in my capri. I have the BBQ that clamps on the Bimini post. Nothing more peaceful than laying in the V berth hearing the gentle lap of the waves while on anchor in a calm cove.

          In NH officially your not suppose to overnight on anchor unless you have someone on watch. In my opinion with gps anchor alarms it's pretty safe in calm waters.

          I solo overnight at anchor often and have never been bothered. I do get a slip sometimes because it is convenient to go to eat and enjoy the local town.

          Comment


            #6
            What kind of setup do you use when you anchor? Do you use two anchors from the bow?
            2010 Bayliner 192 4.3TKS

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks for your reply. When you use a buoy at state parks, is there anything you do to minimize drift? Or just hook up to the buoy?

              Are there limits on where you can anchor overnight? I haven't found anything on the state website (but could be looking in the wrong places too). When you anchor, do you use a single or two off the bow? Or something else?
              2010 Bayliner 192 4.3TKS

              Comment


                #8
                The positive remarks here make me think I could do a lot with my 88' 1950 Cuddy. I am planning on replacing all the upholstery soon and perhaps I should change the layout of the seats to accommodate better sleeping arrangements. I am tall, 6'4", the wife is just 5'7" so she would be comfortable in the Vberth but I am not so sure about me in there too. It has nice cushions, very comfortable and in good condition but the rest of the upholstery needs replacing and updating. If I added canvas to cover the entire boat I could be comfortable on a nice roll up mat between the seats on the deck. Lots of ideas to beat around.
                1988 Capri Cuddy 1950 OMC 5.7

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Knotty_Time View Post
                  We had a 19' cuddly for 20 years. Did a lot of overnights in it. Most of time it was a least 2 nights. I think our longest trip was 7 days. We also brought our 2 girls with us. When we had the girls with us we tried to get dock spots, which was pretty easy being 19'. We had a full camper canvas made for it, which made this all doable. We did have a BBQ which we stuck in a pole holder. We had a little porta pot that fit up in the v-berth. We anchored out most of the time. We did a lot of modifications to the boat to utilize as much storage as possible. We outfitted it to be able to house our scuba gear as well, but only when it was just the two of us. Our floor in the boat as bad, it gave us the "opportunity" we modify things. One of jumper seats could fold down into a bed or prop us for a lounge. On the starboard side we replaced the jumper seat with just a captains chairs, then added a sink/galley and place for cooler right behind it. The back seats could be moved up to make a big bed/lounge as well. We had a blow up dingy too. We stowed it under the jumper seat.

                  Had lots of fun with that boat.
                  do you have some pictures ?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by RandyR View Post
                    What kind of setup do you use when you anchor? Do you use two anchors from the bow?
                    One anchor from the bow is all you should need in any conditions that a reasonable person would consider overnighting in a cuddy.

                    Basically you can drop the hook wherever with very few exceptions, Lake WA/Union is a big one - Andrews bay is the only overnight anchorage.

                    I spent the night in my 21 trophy several times. I won't lie - I was younger, and sleep was heavily aided by cocktails and beer since it isn't all that comfortable. It is far better than tent camping so if you are coming from that perspective it is an upgrade. The cuddy holds heat fairly well but also holds moisture and you will exhale a lot of it overnight.

                    BBQ is the way to go - camp stove requires more pots/pans. Even on our 38 I probably use the BBQ 2x for every time I use the cooktop (and we rarely eat out when on the boat). BBQ bacon or sausage in the AM ....mmmmmm.......
                    1989 3888
                    Nobody gets out alive.

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                      #11
                      We had a 1983 19’ Capri for four months and put 200 hours on it. We moved to a 2450 for a few years until the twins came along to join two older brothers, bigger boat. We went all over in that Capri from Roche Harbor to Olympia, and spent lots of nights on board. A single, good anchor will be fine, have about 20’ of chain connected before the rode. The state park buoys are pretty easy, paying the Ranger is problematic because they usually have a payment box on the beach. You can, however, get an annual permit. You just need to figure out if you are going to use it enough to make it balance.
                      P/C Pete
                      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                      1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                      MMSI 367770440
                      1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                      Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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                        #12
                        Pick up a Waggoner's cruising guide. All the information you need is in that book. State parks, marinas, food and fuel. Your boat will take you to any of the places you would like to go.
                        Ted G
                        The Great PNW

                        86 2850 Contessa SB
                        Designers Edition
                        Mercury 350 Mag
                        290 Volvo DP

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by RandyR View Post
                          We have a Bayliner 192 that I'd like to try overnighting in, in Puget Sound. I've been in big boats overnight in California, but never in Puget Sound, and never a boat this size. I've looked at different south Puget Sound state parks but am unsure about what's legal, and what's appropriate. For example, if I use a buoy at a state part, is staying aboard OK? Can I anchor in coves overnight? Does anyone have experience installing a grill in a boat like this? Or is it better to plan on going ashore to picnic?

                          If you can point me to any resources I'd appreciate it.
                          My son and his wife did some cruising in Puget Sound and the San Juans in smaller boats. He started with a cuddy cabin 15 foot Arima. Later they moved on to a 19 foot Sea Swirl cuddy cabin. Both boats had porta potties. To cook they used hiking cook stoves. Both boats were equipped with anchors and great electronics. Both boats had covers (one canvas, other fiberglass) so you did not have to stay in cuddy cabin in inclimate weather, you could sit in dry comfort to drive or just enjoy the scenery. Both boats used a small inflatable to get to shore when anchored or tied to buoys. Both boats were good in rough water, I towed both behind my 47 including to Alaska. Both boats had kicker/get home engines.
                          ​​
                          Started boating 1965
                          Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

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                            #14
                            I remember Kathy and me staying in a 20' cuddy for a couple nights... if I pushed it anymore, I might not be married anymore
                            Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
                            Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
                            93 3058 sold
                            92 2855 (day boat)
                            91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
                            Longbranch WA
                            Life is Good

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                              #15
                              Do not even think about using 2 anchors. By morning the 2 lines will badly braided together. If that happens you have a big mess.
                              Started boating 1965
                              Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

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