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2252 suitable for rough water?-gctid344830

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    2252 suitable for rough water?-gctid344830

    As the title says, I'm interested in purchasing a 2252 Ciera but wonder how they handle rough conditions.

    I live in Melbourne Australia and Port Phillip Bay can become quite rough. By this, I mean 1 - 1.5 metre breaking waves. I understand drving to the conditions, but if I get cought out, I'd like to be sure that the boat will be able to sustain what you could call open sea conditions.

    I drove a 1992 2252 equiped with a 4.2 Mercruiser and was suprised at the lack of power. Very slow acceleration with a top speed of around 16 knots WOT. Engine revved to 4200 WOT. Boat did not have trim tabs. I was told by the boat broker that some lake weed was attached to the hull slowing the boat down however I don't believe that it would affect performance that much. Boat was running 1/4 tank of fuel, empty water tank and 3 average sized adults.

    Is the 2252 with the 170HP considered underpowered?

    I have a mooring and I'm also wondering how the sterndrive goes sitting in salt water. The plan is to pull the boat out every 6 months, but use all year round.

    Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    #2
    Welcome to the BOC!

    With regards to your questions- the 4.2 is a diesel, while the 4.3 is a v-6 gas/petrol engine. Can you confirm which engine you are looking at?

    The 4.3 in that hull should scoot you around quite nicely, even with the load you mentioned. Perhaps the prop hub is sheared, or there are other problems with the boat? I don't think growth (unless extreme) would slow down the boat that much.

    Sterndrives do fine in saltwater- just make sure that your zincs are good, and you're good. Paint the bottom with an ablative paint to minimize marine growth, and check it every time you haul out.

    Comment


      #3
      Pau Hana wrote:
      Welcome to the BOC!

      With regards to your questions- the 4.2 is a diesel, while the 4.3 is a v-6 gas/petrol engine. Can you confirm which engine you are looking at?

      The 4.3 in that hull should scoot you around quite nicely, even with the load you mentioned. Perhaps the prop hub is sheared, or there are other problems with the boat? I don't think growth (unless extreme) would slow down the boat that much.

      Sterndrives do fine in saltwater- just make sure that your zincs are good, and you're good. Paint the bottom with an ablative paint to minimize marine growth, and check it every time you haul out.
      Thanks for the welcome!!

      It's the 4.3 petrol. There's no other issues that I can see with the boat. Has a new engine with 23 hours (verified by receipts), new heat exchangers. Engine seems to run fine however the issue was that it revved hard with no forward motion.

      But back to the main question, can bayliners handle swell?

      Google map Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia and you should be able to see the area that I play in!

      Comment


        #4
        In short- yes, the.2252 can handle swell; the major factor is wave periodicity (time interval between wave peaks). If the periodicity is high (say, [email protected] 15 seconds, you have what equates to a fast, easy ride. Conversely, decrease the time period to 8 seconds, and you have a vomit comet....

        Comment


          #5
          look behind the motor and if you see little rubber pieces and smell rubber burning the coupler may well be on the way out.

          Also the prop may have spun. Meaning if you put on a known good prop and it fix's the problem you have the solution.

          And yes alot of marine growth on a hull can and will slow down the boat.

          Raritan bay does gets bad as well you should be ok with that setup if the motor and drive are in good shape. Throw on a kicker so you have a way back in.
          Be good, be happy, for tomorrow is promised to no man !

          1994 2452, 5.0l, Alpha gen. 2 drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

          '86 / 19' Citation cuddy, Merc. 3.0L / 140 hp 86' , stringer drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

          Manalapan N.J

          Comment


            #6
            I have a 2355 and have taken it out into the main channel (20+ miles / Catalina Island) a few times when the swells were 2 or more feet. Part of the trip where the swells from different directions hit can magnify the turbulance.

            I love it and have no issue with the ride. The family on the other hand can get a bit green and we have had to slow up and allow for some heaving over the side more than once. It all depends on your preference. You will feel the ride, no doubt about that in a deep V hull less than 30'. When you slow down or are forced to stop the rockin and rollin gets even more pronounced.

            CP

            Comment


              #7
              and got rid of it because it was underpowered with a decent load in it, but I will say it handled really well in 8' swells coming back from catalina, they had a pretty good interval between swells but when we were down we could not see over the wave, it was cool and a little scary at the time. the boat with a 5.7 would be pretty nice

              Comment


                #8
                bbruno wrote:
                and got rid of it because it was underpowered with a decent load in it, but I will say it handled really well in 8' swells coming back from catalina, they had a pretty good interval between swells but when we were down we could not see over the wave, it was cool and a little scary at the time. the boat with a 5.7 would be pretty nice
                I was thinking the same thing.

                Speaking with experianced local boaties, Bayliner's (less than 25ft) are not suitable for the conditions I'll be using the boat in.

                The hulls can flex and there have been instances of cracked cabin windows as a result.

                My issue was as well the underpowered issue, but I think the boat I tested had a drivline issue.

                I love the Bayliner but I'll now have to look at local manufactured boats, built for the conditions we face here in Melboune.

                At least 'down under' we can use our vessells all year round!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Echunda wrote:
                  I was thinking the same thing.

                  Speaking with experianced local boaties, Bayliner's (less than 25ft) are not suitable for the conditions I'll be using the boat in.

                  The hulls can flex and there have been instances of cracked cabin windows as a result.

                  My issue was as well the underpowered issue, but I think the boat I tested had a drivline issue.

                  I love the Bayliner but I'll now have to look at local manufactured boats, built for the conditions we face here in Melboune.

                  At least 'down under' we can use our vessells all year round!
                  I would have thought anything under 25ft in Port Phillip in rough weather would have been terrible the waves are close and can be quite steep, I've had my tinny out in the bay a few times and its great when its flat but it can blow up really quick.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Echunda wrote:
                    I was thinking the same thing.

                    Speaking with experianced local boaties, Bayliner's (less than 25ft) are not suitable for the conditions I'll be using the boat in.

                    The hulls can flex and there have been instances of cracked cabin windows as a result.

                    My issue was as well the underpowered issue, but I think the boat I tested had a drivline issue.

                    I love the Bayliner but I'll now have to look at local manufactured boats, built for the conditions we face here in Melboune.

                    At least 'down under' we can use our vessells all year round!
                    not sure about the bayliners and flexing, I have found them to be pretty well built boats and honestly prefer them to most other brands, now the under powered thing is what kills me about bayliners, every one I have owned seems a bit underpowered. I have a wellcraft 26' openbow right now and it is the worst handling boat I have ever owned but it has a 7.4l with a duoprop volvo so plenty of power but in my opinion is a less well built boat than any bayliner I have owned

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Echunda wrote:
                      I was told by the boat broker that some lake weed was attached to the hull slowing the boat down however I don't believe that .
                      Don't forget Rule 1 for Brokers; never tell the truth when a lie might work better. Bottom growth certainly can cripple a boat, but it sounds like you have other things that need to be checked.

                      Rule 3 may also have come into play; if you don't know the answer, make something up.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Echunda,

                        I've been boating oin the bay for 30 years.

                        I now run a Discovry 192 with a MPI 4.3 (220hp) and have no trouble in Port Philip.

                        Handles 1 meter chop with no issues at 40kmph.

                        If it get up to the 1.5m nasties you need to slow down a touch depending on your course.

                        Have fitted trim tabs and performance much better.

                        The 192 looks like a little bro to the 2252.

                        If you want to get some air and pound the hull a lot you can damage most boats, but how is your back?

                        Alan

                        Melbourne

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Echunda wrote:
                          ... Very slow acceleration with a top speed of around 16 knots WOT. Engine revved to 4200 WOT...
                          I do not think the prop is spun . It would over rev if that was the case.

                          Slow acceleration and low rpm is an indication of being over propped. (Too Much Pitch!)

                          That engine should run at 4500-5000 rpm WOT. And easily 30+ mph.

                          In an attempt to make it faster, someone may have changed the prop for the worse!

                          What you end up doing is turning up a lot of water and go nowhere fast.

                          What are the numbers on the prop?

                          Otherwise have a look at the bottom. You could be dragging a dolphin at that speed.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thanks Alan.

                            Too many people within the industry have advise NOT to buy a sterndrive boat for mooring. They've all stated the maintenance of a sterndive in water is too expensive. As much as it pains me, I'm no longer searching for a Bayliner, instead searching for a boat built locally such as Haines Signature or Caribbean. I'm no where near wealthy and I don't think I could afford the upkeep of such a boat.

                            the boating advise I have been given are from the following:

                            - Boat mechanic at one of Melbourne's major marina's with 15 years experiance working within a marina environment.

                            - Boat Builder - Builds large pleasurecraft. - Not going to say who....

                            - Very experianced sailer, raced, sailed, delivered owned all types of boats 20 years + experiance.

                            With them all saying the same thing, there must be an issue there.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Echunda,

                              I agree mooring costs $.

                              I was looking at at 26 + footer and at Patterson Lakes a pen was in the order of 7-8K$ per year.

                              But to put it in the rack was only an extra from memory $900 - which is what I was going to do.

                              Easily worth the extra money as you will save that on monthly hull scubs, yearly hull antifouling work and stern drive damage and the impact of the weather.

                              But 9K$ a year is a lot and your stuck at the same location, so I went for the 192 that was easy to tow, so no pen issues.

                              If you do not have the $s - why are you looking at a boat to pen?

                              I was also looking at a big Haines or Signature but they are much to expnsive, particulary the second hand ones.

                              A 2 year old Bayliner turned up at a great price (with a little bit of needs compromise) so I went for it.

                              Don't be brand specific, go for a style/type that suites your percieved needs.

                              It's a real buyers market at the moment....got an old tinnie for sale...intereasted?

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