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    Fendering-gctid373770

    Hi all

    Have just got our first boat a 185BR.

    There is only 3 cleats on each side and if a attach a fender on each, as the front cleat is so far forward, there seems very little protection for the front due to the curve of the front.

    Beeing a novice I am particually worried about damaging the boat when berthing etc, has only else added another cleat? Access seem difficult to fit! What do you guys do? Or am I just beeing over cautious?

    Any input welcome, thanks guys!

    Kind regards

    Pico

    #2
    There are aftermarket fender hangers you can attach to your boat. This would allow you to attach additional fenders. When I had my 1950 it had the same cleat placement as you describe. I used to attach the fenders to a line and tie the line to the grab handles inside the boat, one in the bow and the other in the stern.

    If you are berthing your boat for a period of time, and you have the ability to tie the boat off on both the port and starboard side, the proper use of spring lines should be sufficient.
    Gregg
    2006 225 BR
    XT Package
    5.0 MPI
    Alpha I Gen II
    39.41130 N
    76.35131W

    Comment


      #3
      There is a wide array of gadgets made to attach fenders to your boat at locations other than the cleats.

      For the front fender on my boat, I clip it to the bow rail.

      There are suction cup mounts that are okay for day use.

      There are mounts made specifically for fenders, much easier than putting in cleats since they dont have to be as sturdy.

      http://www.ezfender.com/

      Comment


        #4
        What works best for me is a commercial bouy ball, about 12-14 inches in diameter up fwd, being in Alaska I have never had to pay for one, we just pick them up when out crusing; that being said, buy one, they work well and come in all sizes.
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

        Comment


          #5
          Hi all

          Thanks for the replies guys, much appreciated.

          I had thought about tying to front grab handles as they are roughly in the location I want to protect, but I was a little worried about marking boat were rope runs over the side, particually sometimes when lock is opened too quick!!

          The Ezfender link looks like a neat idea! Haven't looked if anyone sells in the UK yet though. Do you guys think that these can just be screwed down straight into boat OR do you still think that they will require some support behind? As if not I think this is the best answer for me.

          Thanks again guys,

          Pico

          Comment


            #6
            picotrain wrote:
            Hi all

            Thanks for the replies guys, much appreciated.

            I had thought about tying to front grab handles as they are roughly in the location I want to protect, but I was a little worried about marking boat were rope runs over the side, particually sometimes when lock is opened too quick!!

            The Ezfender link looks like a neat idea! Haven't looked if anyone sells in the UK yet though. Do you guys think that these can just be screwed down straight into boat OR do you still think that they will require some support behind? As if not I think this is the best answer for me.

            Thanks again guys,

            Pico
            Use the front grab handles like you thought of...there isn't any rope damage that I can think of that would offset the trouble (and drilling) that an additional cleat would require!

            I've tied mine to the handles for years, and have never seen any damage whatsoever.

            Happy boating!
            Boating Supplies

            Comment


              #7
              As long as your stern line is taught, a fender forward of the windshield is not needed. The bow curvature makes a foreward fender pretty useless. Berthing is usually a fairly calm affair, but if you can, tie a line from your forward cleat (opposite the pier) to a cleat perpendicular to the boat. This will ensure the bow won't crowd/contact the pier, and you can actually dock with one or two fenders on the rear quarter of the boat.

              Comment


                #8
                picotrain wrote:
                There is only 3 cleats on each side and if a attach a fender on each, as the front cleat is so far forward, there seems very little protection for the front due to the curve of the front.

                Beeing a novice I am particually worried about damaging the boat when berthing etc, has only else added another cleat? Access seem difficult to fit! What do you guys do? Or am I just beeing over cautious?
                Pico, a couple of comments and suggestions if I may.

                You're new to boating, correct? This means that your boating friends may also be new to boating.

                1... you mentioned "cleats".... so I assume this is a standard style cleat that will allow a dock line to loop through it and be drawn down.

                2... use fenders that allows for the dock lines to permanently attach to them. Attach a dock line to each fender using the eye splice method.

                Make sure you have enough length.... perhaps 15 feet or so.

                Now you have one line that will set and hold the fender height....., and will double as your dock line.

                One line per cleat .... and no issues.

                3... Never use the forward-most cleats..... use the stern cleats and midship cleats ONLY.

                Here's why:

                People with little experience will tend to pull on a forward line or bow line pulling the bow into the dock. They think that they're helping.

                The bow now comes into the dock (fener hopefully cushioning it) and the hull wants to pivot and cause the stern to swing away from the dock.

                Meanwhile, the guy in charge of the stern cleat may not be paying attention.

                (you watch next time you are at the boat launch.... I'll almost guarantee you that you'll see this!)

                So limit your lines to stern and midship cleats ONLY...., and this likely won't happen to you...., and your worries about forward damage are reduced.

                Also, I'd go with fenders that are a bit larger than what you think are necessary. They'll be a bit more difficult to stow, but IMO, well worth it.

                If you end up "Rafting Up" with other boats, these will come in very handy.

                .
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                  #9
                  2850Bounty wrote:
                  Pico, a couple of comments and suggestions if I may.

                  You're new to boating, correct? This means that your boating friends may also be new to boating.

                  1... you mentioned "cleats".... so I assume this is a standard style cleat that will allow a dock line to loop through it and be drawn down.

                  2... use fenders that allows for the dock lines to permanently attach to them. Attach a dock line to each fender using the eye splice method.

                  Make sure you have enough length.... perhaps 15 feet or so.

                  Now you have one line that will set and hold the fender height....., and will double as your dock line.

                  One line per cleat .... and no issues.

                  3... Never use the forward-most cleats..... use the stern cleats and midship cleats ONLY.

                  Here's why:

                  People with little experience will tend to pull on a forward line or bow line pulling the bow into the dock. They think that they're helping.

                  The bow now comes into the dock (fener hopefully cushioning it) and the hull wants to pivot and cause the stern to swing away from the dock.

                  Meanwhile, the guy in charge of the stern cleat may not be paying attention.

                  (you watch next time you are at the boat launch.... I'll almost guarantee you that you'll see this!)

                  So limit your lines to stern and midship cleats ONLY...., and this likely won't happen to you...., and your worries about forward damage are reduced.

                  Also, I'd go with fenders that are a bit larger than what you think are necessary. They'll be a bit more difficult to stow, but IMO, well worth it.

                  If you end up "Rafting Up" with other boats, these will come in very handy.

                  .
                  I'm missing something here. Why are we tying dock lines to fenders?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    whiskywizard wrote:
                    I'm missing something here. Why are we tying dock lines to fenders?
                    Mike, I've found that it actually works quite well..... small boat or larger boat.

                    It was just a suggestion based on him being new, and his questions regarding 3 cleats per side....., and the other suggestion of adding fender hanger brackets.

                    I thought that he could kill two birds with the same stone, and not need to drill any new holes for fender hangers.

                    .
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #11
                      whiskywizard wrote:
                      I'm missing something here. Why are we tying dock lines to fenders?
                      I do that with my little bowrider. Each fender has a long line with two loops: one at the end and one midline strategically placed close to the fender. When docking, I use the middle loop to hang the fender, it stays at the waterline where it's supposed to be. The rest of the line is used to tie to the dock: it goes around whatever dock cleat or piling, and returns to the same boat cleat using the end loop. One cleat, one line, one fender. To undock, I just remove the end loop and let loose. This quick release method is specially good when I'm pivoting the bow to maneuver by myself: let loose port line, pivot, let loose bow line, back away.

                      I'm sure it wouldnt work with bigger boats, but in my case it's perfect.
                      Rafael Figueira
                      1998 Bayliner Capri 1800 LS

                      Comment


                        #12
                        2850Bounty wrote:
                        Mike, I've found that it actually works quite well..... small boat or larger boat.

                        It was just a suggestion based on him being new, and his questions regarding 3 cleats per side....., and the other suggestion of adding fender hanger brackets.

                        I thought that he could kill two birds with the same stone, and not need to drill any new holes for fender hangers.

                        .
                        rafaelfigueira wrote:
                        I do that with my little bowrider. Each fender has a long line with two loops: one at the end and one midline strategically placed close to the fender. When docking, I use the middle loop to hang the fender, it stays at the waterline where it's supposed to be. The rest of the line is used to tie to the dock: it goes around whatever dock cleat or piling, and returns to the same boat cleat using the end loop. One cleat, one line, one fender. To undock, I just remove the end loop and let loose. This quick release method is specially good when I'm pivoting the bow to maneuver by myself: let loose port line, pivot, let loose bow line, back away.

                        I'm sure it wouldnt work with bigger boats, but in my case it's perfect.
                        Thanks. I understand now what you're doing. I think I'll try a couple of those on my tin boat.

                        I don't think that would work well for me on Jam Today. Dock lines and spring lines are a mix of 3/4" and 5/8". Most are 30' or longer. And the fenders are getting heavier too. The admiral wouldn't like it much.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Mike, I know that there's always more than one way to skin the cat.

                          I like the method for me in that I simply run the line up/through a cleat, adjust the height of the fender, and pull it tight to hold it.

                          I do lace the line (one extra hitch) so that the pull works to the advantage of holding steadfast in the cleat.

                          I then take the remainder of the line to the dock cleat, and tie off.

                          Another thing that I'll do, is I'll set this up before I come in.

                          My lines are long enough that I can toss them up on the flybridge or into the cockpit area, all ready to go.

                          If I come in alone, or with someone that is not familiar with docking, all I do is grab the two lines and step off onto the dock, and hope to H_ll that I don't fall in.

                          When I first began doing this, I wondered if the loop at the boat cleat would slip.... but so far/so good.

                          If it's windy, then I'll used a second set of lines set up as spring lines with the rubber snubbers.
                          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hi GuysThanks for all your replies and comments, sorry for delay in reply.I have now been out in the boat a hand full of times and as a complete novice, I scare my self silly, particually when it comes to coming in and out of the lock with lots of pro's in there expensive boats watching me.However now I have been out a couple of times, I still have some issues with fendering, it is almost definatly be being stupid, BUT I would like some feedback or ideas if you guys would not mind!The marina I keep my boat in is non-tidal, so has locks to get in and out, the lock's have solid sided pontoons, IE not overhanging! so its like tying up against a wall.Because of this I still have fender issues, as the cleats on my boat are so close to the rub rail if I tie the fenders so that the top of the fender is below the rub rail, then the fender appears not gig enough and the rub rail would hit the pontoon, so I have to tie the fenders so there is almost no rope drop at all, so fenders stick out at some stupid angle.Do I buy bigger fenders, as I dont want to for storage, particually as when you enter the lock, until you are almost right in the entrance you dont know what side you will be tying up on, so I have to have all fenders already tied up to both sides of boat, so currently using 6 to 8 fenders.I have though that I will tie a fender to the front handles as recomended, although still have concerns about rope rubbing on side cusions (particually when lock can get a little rough at extreams of tides).I was thinking ahead as I want to master single crewing of my boat, and trying to stand off of lock entrance tiying 6 fenders to boat with normally other boats behind me coming in is a bit frantic for a novice like me.I was thinking that I might buy some of these!

                            [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/686770=27816-SnapShackle_Kong_lock.jpg[/img]The idea being that I could attach a fender to these with a length of rope exactly the right length so that I can quickly attach and remove fenders to the front handles!So what do you guys think? does anyone else use similar ideas.I would live to do this to all the fenders but due to my above comments about only the small gap between cleat and rubrail. there would be know way I could do this as by the time you have the length of the clip itself and minimul rope the fender would end up being well below the rub rail and offer no protection.I guess I could use just 2 fenders a side, front and rear handles, but as a novice that often comes in at the wrong angle I need fenders everwere, lol!!!Sorry guys for stupid questions but any thoughts welcome as always.Kind RegardsPico

                            Comment


                              #15
                              On my oldie they didn't bother with to much hardware and I only have a cleat at the stern and one at the bow (center). I have these suction cup things and they work well. One is at the end of the windshield (attached inside), the other one on the outside of the front window.

                              Just ordered some SS cleats to mount more midships as I am tired of the angled way the boat will be at the dock with a line from the bow. This will also allow me to hang the fenders from the docking line. Makes it easier to change sides.

                              You don't want these metal "hooks" clipped in! They will scratch your gel-coat big time when the boat goes up and down with the waves.

                              Comment

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