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    I need to replace some wood-gctid340306

    LOL, I resisted the double entendre opportunity ... barely.

    So, I need to repair the engine cover and the seats to each side of it. The engine cover is in the worst condition. So my questions are:

    1.) What are the Good/Better/Best options for the replacement wood. Meaning OSB, MDF, solid wood, plywood, etc ...?

    2.) If plywood is the Better/Best choice, why type of plywood, meaning: sheathing, fir, pine, underlayment, hardwoods like birch, maple, oak?

    3.) Use only non pressure treated wood.

    4.) Apply a layer of fiberglass resin to all sides. Epoxy or Polyesther or does it matter?

    5.) Is there a need to apply a layer of cloth or mat to the wood?

    6.) Anything else?

    Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/642852=23137-IMAG1780.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/642852=23138-IMAG1782.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/642852=23139-IMAG1785.jpg[/img]

    #2
    A lot will depend on how long you want the repair to last. I did the jump seats in my 16' after I heard a crack as someone walked over them. No rot, though. Only 3/8ths plywood.. I replaced with 1/2 inch (B/C pine, I think) plywood and just painted them for basic protection. Replacement was easy.

    Applying resin would be the next step up. Polyester will be cheaper. Mat would be over the top, IMO

    Using MDF will be particularly heavy, solid wood-more expensive and not as strong unless you go hardwood...then really expensive. I'd try to do the engine cover as thin as possible to save weight. Whatever's on there now worked for 25 years....

    Remember to use SS staples. Those tiny ones BL used are fun to get out.....and there are lots of them, although yours look like they're coming apart, so you're ahead there, lol.

    Good Luck

    Comment


      #3
      1. Best option in my experience would be a good grade of plywood. the more plies the better with an A grade face

      2. Fir is the best reasonably priced option in terms of rot resistance.

      3. Pressure treated is good but not really worth the extra cost and effort in my opinion/ (Pressure treated doesn't usually come in an A grade.)

      4. Yes, seal with either, and add a layer of woven in a very light weave for the exposed side.

      5. See above, this will give a good stable foundation for the paint which is required to protect the resin sealer.

      6. You could also go with MDO, seal the edges and paint. this won't be as bullet proof but will provide a serviceable result.

      DO NOT USE MDF. MDF stands for medium density fiberboard. Think CARDBOARD!! Or a dry sponge waiting for water. It has no use in a marine environ.

      Comment


        #4
        I actually think this one should be in the new forum. I used cdx when doing my sides and seats. 1/2 " would do it. I also recommend stainless steal staples. Not all stainless steel staples are created equal, the ones you get in home cheapo and blows don't stand up to saltwater well.
        Be good, be happy, for tomorrow is promised to no man !

        1994 2452, 5.0l, Alpha gen. 2 drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

        '86 / 19' Citation cuddy, Merc. 3.0L / 140 hp 86' , stringer drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

        Manalapan N.J

        Comment


          #5
          boatommy wrote:
          1. Best option in my experience would be a good grade of plywood. the more plies the better with an A grade face

          2. Fir is the best reasonably priced option in terms of rot resistance.

          3. Pressure treated is good but not really worth the extra cost and effort in my opinion/ (Pressure treated doesn't usually come in an A grade.)

          4. Yes, seal with either, and add a layer of woven in a very light weave for the exposed side.

          5. See above, this will give a good stable foundation for the paint which is required to protect the resin sealer.

          6. You could also go with MDO, seal the edges and paint. this won't be as bullet proof but will provide a serviceable result.

          DO NOT USE MDF. MDF stands for medium density fiberboard. Think CARDBOARD!! Or a dry sponge waiting for water. It has no use in a marine environ.
          Pressure treated wood is not to be used if considering a resin overcoat.

          Comment


            #6
            Yup, your wood doesnt look so good.

            Mine doesn't look bad, but I want to modify it so I have more access to the motor. My motor box is about 2' high and is attached to the floor. Then there is a plastic box on top that lifts off.

            I want to make it one piece so it all comes off flush with the floor. I have seen some of the older boats like this and it looks like it would of made changing my fuel pump almost pleasureable.

            Has anyone done this?

            Comment


              #7
              Fish-a-Palooza wrote:
              Pressure treated wood is not to be used if considering a resin overcoat.
              Thanx Wayne!,

              I wasn't aware of that. I'd modify my response to include:

              If this piece is to be upholstered, just seal the edges of any quality plywood, paint and upholster.

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks tbear, boatommy, Fish-a-Palooza, green650 for the replies and info.

                Chief Alen wrote:
                I actually think this one should be in the new forum. I used cdx when doing my sides and seats. 1/2 " would do it. I also recommend stainless steal staples. Not all stainless steel staples are created equal, the ones you get in home cheapo and blows don't stand up to saltwater well.
                Kewlness, lets move it there if that makes sense. Thanks for the info about the staples, as those are the places I would have gone to to get some. Where should I acquire the good stuff? Also, thanks for the mention of CDX. I looked it up, it looks like a good candidate.

                Side note, how do you multi-quote with this new version of BOC? Do I need to change my "editor version" to WYSIWYG?

                Thanks,

                -Jorden

                Comment


                  #9
                  I just replaced all the plywood in my vessle - seats and sun deck/ engine cover. I used 3/4 inch CDX ply for the sundeck and painted with 2 coats of exterior enamel dove gray paint for protection. For the seats i used 1/2 inch CDX plywood with paint also. My upholstrey and foam was in decent shape to be reused. I used Arrow T50 Monel staples to put everything back together. They are expensive but i am going to be using the boat in salt water and need the extra corrosion protection. You can buy the Monel staples at building centers like Lowes or Home Depot.

                  Chip n Kathy Smith

                  Houston, TX

                  1999 Capri 1850SS

                  2- 1993 Sea Doo GTX's

                  2002 Sea Doo GTX 4-TEC

                  1964 Ford Fairlane 500

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Making progress replacing the wood. Using a good grade of ply for the large seat. Applied West Marine polyesther resin. I've place one coat on so far.How many coats of resin should I use?Also, the PO used regular staples apparently when they replaced the wood before. Boy did they make a mess when they rusted away. The covers and cushions aren't in the best shape, but they will get me through this season.

                    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/672356=26192-IMG_0168.jpg[/img]

                    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/672356=26193-IMG_0169.jpg[/img]

                    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/672356=26194-IMG_0173.jpg[/img]

                    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/672356=26195-IMG_0174.jpg[/img]

                    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/672356=26196-IMG_0177.jpg[/img]

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Resin alone is a waste of time and materials - resin is very brittle by itself and then you are going to shoot a ton of staples into it and start the cracking.

                      I have gone round and round with this in my head and tried everything under the sun. My newest approach is simply plywood with two coats of rustolem - first coat thinned down to soak into wood a bit better, then a normal coat to all surfaces. I do try to use better (more plys & A surface)plywood and never use 3/8, if it can be thin (like side panels) then 1/4 is fine, if it is a seat or anything structural then go with the 1/2"

                      It is going to rot again, once you accept that one or two years difference on the next replacement 8-9yrs out isn't a big deal.

                      Not sure why this is off in the bowriders section - this is general boat stuff that we all deal with in one way or another.
                      1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
                      1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
                      Nobody gets out alive.

                      Comment


                        #13
                        kwb wrote:
                        Resin alone is a waste of time and materials - resin is very brittle by itself and then you are going to shoot a ton of staples into it and start the cracking.

                        I have gone round and round with this in my head and tried everything under the sun. My newest approach is simply plywood with two coats of rustolem - first coat thinned down to soak into wood a bit better, then a normal coat to all surfaces. I do try to use better (more plys & A surface)plywood and never use 3/8, if it can be thin (like side panels) then 1/4 is fine, if it is a seat or anything structural then go with the 1/2"

                        It is going to rot again, once you accept that one or two years difference on the next replacement 8-9yrs out isn't a big deal.

                        Not sure why this is off in the bowriders section - this is general boat stuff that we all deal with in one way or another.
                        Oh wow! Wish I had known this before I started doing the work. Oh well, I guess I can still use your technique. I've only applied resin to one side and the edges. I can use the rustoleum on the flip side and the rest of the pieces. What did you thin it with, and what ratio?

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Flash Jorden wrote:
                          LOL, I resisted the double entendre opportunity ... barely.

                          So, I need to repair the engine cover and the seats to each side of it. The engine cover is in the worst condition. So my questions are:

                          1.) What are the Good/Better/Best options for the replacement wood. Meaning OSB, MDF, solid wood, plywood, etc ...?

                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          IMO I would use marine grade plywood (mahogany) I just boat a sheet of 4x8x3/4 for my swim platform rebuild $177.00

                          [/COLOR]2.) If plywood is the Better/Best choice, why type of plywood, meaning: sheathing, fir, pine, underlayment, hardwoods like birch, maple, oak?

                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          See above[/COLOR].

                          3.) Use only non pressure treated wood.

                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          Pressure treated wood contains arsenic and I would not use in a marine environment

                          [/COLOR]4.) Apply a layer of fiberglass resin to all sides. Epoxy or Polyesther or does it matter?

                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          You could epoxy both sides and the edges using a foam roller (wet out) that will certainly make it last longer.[/COLOR]

                          5.) Is there a need to apply a layer of cloth or mat to the wood?

                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          IMO No

                          [/COLOR]

                          6.) Anything else?
                          [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                          Stainless or the new carbon staples

                          [/COLOR]

                          Comment


                            #15
                            crowder.dr wrote:
                            [COLOR]#FF0000 wrote:
                            IMO I would use marine grade plywood (mahogany) I just boat a sheet of 4x8x3/4 for my swim platform rebuild $177.00[/COLOR]
                            Wow. Luckily he already has it. Crowder, these are cushion bottoms, not show pieces. Engine covers of this vintage are vinyl covered. The wood is strictly for support. Mahogany is unnecessary. Nothing will be seen.

                            Comment

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