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Loading your boat onto the trailer........-gctid364358

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    LazyBouy19 wrote:


    But im not thrusting much at all when doing it, just a tiny shot a couple times to get the last foot or so


    :goo-

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    LazyBouy19 wrote:
    Interesting read.

    I power load every single time!! Hmmm, maybe I won't anymore. But im not thrusting much at all when doing it, just a tiny shot a couple times to get the last foot or so to be able to hook up the safety chain. Then I hook up the winch line and winch a little bit until it is pretty hard to winch. then I drive out and when on level ground i winch the rest of the way. It takes everything I have to winch it all the way when it is still in the water, and I don't want to break anything on the winch.

    It seems most people on here don't have to put their trailer in very far to get the boat on. I have to have my fenders and rub pads at least a few inches or more under water, and even then it doesn't glide on far enough to hook up the safety cable. That is when i give it a couple easy shots of the throttle to get a few more inches. Plus I grew up watching everyone do this.
    As the saying goes, whatever floats your boat... But I've been boating for over 20 years and have always powered my boats on the trailer, and never had a problem. I basically bring it up at idle speed, which usually brings me over halfway up on the trailer. I will then CAREFULLY ease in a bit of power (drive up about halfway) to get me on the rest of the way. I then winch it up the last few inches, if needed, then pull it off the ramp.

    Easy, peasy, especially since I'm usually doing all this by myself.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    tbkohl wrote:
    Back the trailer down till the fenders are just about under.

    No powerloading for our baby.

    Just a smooth slide up on the bunks.

    Snug it up with the winch.
    I do the same get wheel fenders just under water and winch the boat on by hand, easy peasy. Goes on very easy by hand. But if the fenders are 1 or 2 inches above the water it's hard to get on and off, they must just be under water to get the bunks wet.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I have though about changing the bunks to rolers however someone told me bunks are better for the boat as the load is spread more evenly. Makes sence to me.

    I have sprayed my bunks with silicone spray, this definately help with the slide.

    I would like to lift the boat a little higher on the trailer to clear the guards, 4 inches would do it. Has anyone done this?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm new to the boat world, I have a new 185. My first outting I had a friend walk me through the power load and I hated it. It was a windy day and he needed to take a few tries to get lined up straight. I back in normally enough to dunk the bunks than pull ahead a bit so the the first foot of the bunks are out. Than pull the boat up with a rope and winch the last 2-3 feet. I've had no issues on any ramp with it being to hard to winch. So I'll continue to do it this way till I get a large enough boat that I can't I suppose. Lol

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If you can't winch the boat up to the bow stop on the ramp then you don't have the trailer in far enough.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Interesting read.

    I power load every single time!! Hmmm, maybe I won't anymore. But im not thrusting much at all when doing it, just a tiny shot a couple times to get the last foot or so to be able to hook up the safety chain. Then I hook up the winch line and winch a little bit until it is pretty hard to winch. then I drive out and when on level ground i winch the rest of the way. It takes everything I have to winch it all the way when it is still in the water, and I don't want to break anything on the winch.

    It seems most people on here don't have to put their trailer in very far to get the boat on. I have to have my fenders and rub pads at least a few inches or more under water, and even then it doesn't glide on far enough to hook up the safety cable. That is when i give it a couple easy shots of the throttle to get a few more inches. Plus I grew up watching everyone do this.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I also never power onto the trailer.

    The wash from your prop can cause all sorts of damage. Debris can be washed in and around the ramp. Concrete will weaken under water over the years and lumps can be broken off. concrete lumps, dust and other debris can end up getting sucked into your drive. The list goes on and the general consensus is:

    Just don't power load.

    Its not hard to shut the engine off and drift onto your bunks. Often times the boat will "stick" well enough for you to simply jump off the bow (with line in hand) and hook up the winch.

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  • rafaelfigueira
    replied
    Macca wrote:
    Most ramps we use are concrete so the wash is not a problem, also when I power load the leg it trimmed up so the wash is going up not down.
    The trim doesnt matter much. Even if your prop were pointing straight up, something needs to fill the bottom as water is pushed up. I mean, you are not creating vacuum, right? Power loading creates currents that displaces materials. Depending on the ramp it may not make much difference. If the ramp is long enough, than any displacement will be so deep that nobody will ever care about. That is, until http://"http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_fr... down by a lot...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I have a 175 with a Karavan trailer that has bunks. Is it possible to switch the bunks to rollers? What would be involved?

    Thanks,

    Kent

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I don't think power loading should be discouraged it is just another way of loading, the comments here suggest that in some areas you are not allowed to due to local regs which you should respect.

    Most ramps we use are concrete so the wash is not a problem, also when I power load the leg it trimmed up so the wash is going up not down.

    I have seen the videos of boats on the back of trucks but it is like driving your car out the other side of your garage, do the wrong thing and bad things will happen. I do agree if you are winching it would be pretty hard to stuff it up mind you....

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  • Chesapeake
    replied
    Davem2421 wrote:
    its interesting reading about how everybody discourages powering onto the trailer and yet the few boat dealers I've been to in FL during the demo actually show you how to power onto the trailer and say thats what you should do...

    as a new/novice boater, unless I came here I'd never know that powering on is not a good idea.
    Bass boaters do it all the time. I guess they have tons more experience.

    I have never power loaded. More things can go wrong when you power load. Not much can go wrong if you crank it up the trailer. Also the wash from the thrust of the prop will create pot holes in the ramp by blowing out the river bed at the ramp. (unless the ramp is concrete)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    its interesting reading about how everybody discourages powering onto the trailer and yet the few boat dealers I've been to in FL during the demo actually show you how to power onto the trailer and say thats what you should do...

    as a new/novice boater, unless I came here I'd never know that powering on is not a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    JimB CA wrote:
    I never power on, a few years ago had to help get a boat out of the bed of a pickup. Seems he hit the throttle while standing and zing, up and over it went.I back my trailer down to where the water just hits the top of the fender covers, and have side guides as i load by myself most all the time. Take a long line, pull it up on the trailer and then hook it up. Always centered and easy.

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
    Ditto. Works like a dream. Never have to power onto the trailer. I launch and retrieve myself ALL the time. 20 ft rope, and side guides are all you need.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Danny wrote:
    Tony,

    Mostly the same .

    Except I don't power on at all, go in a little deeper, and just the winch for the last bit.
    +1

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