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Loading your boat onto the trailer........-gctid364358

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    Loading your boat onto the trailer........-gctid364358

    Just reading through the Boat ramp thread has posed a question...

    When I load my 185BR I back the trailer so about 1 ft of the guards are showing above the water, this allows me to drive the boat most of the way onto the trailer meaning only having to winch the last 2 foot or so. Normally I keep the power on to help the person winching and job done.

    I find trying to winch teh boat most of the way on is just too much work and really takes some doing.

    I have athe trailer with skids not rollers.

    Does anyone do the differently and if so how and why.

    #2
    Macca wrote:
    Just reading through the Boat ramp thread has posed a question...

    When I load my 185BR I back the trailer so about 1 ft of the guards are showing above the water, this allows me to drive the boat most of the way onto the trailer meaning only having to winch the last 2 foot or so. Normally I keep the power on to help the person winching and job done.

    I find trying to winch teh boat most of the way on is just too much work and really takes some doing.

    I have athe trailer with skids not rollers.

    Does anyone do the differently and if so how and why.
    Tony,

    Mostly the same .

    Except I don't power on at all, go in a little deeper, and just the winch for the last bit.

    Comment


      #3
      If you go in all the way getting the carpeted bunks wet, then pull out a foot or two, you'll find it easier to winch the boat up tight.
      Jeff & Tara
      (And Ginger too)
      Lake Havasu City, AZ

      2000 Bayliner 3388
      "GetAway"
      Cummins 4bta 250s

      In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

      Comment


        #4
        I never "power loaded" my old 16'. I wish I would have had trailer guides though. Small boat, crappy ramps, solo boater....

        On a few occasions I've had to redunk the boat to get the boat on straight. Never have had a problem with crankin the boat up on bunks, though. I usually would pull the boat onto the trailer (well dunked) w/no power from the pier. Clip the bow eye and crank it up maybe 2 feet. Then center the boat and pull out a bit. Sometimes some "adjustment" was needed...usually just a nudge to get in correct. I had 4 bunks on my trailer.

        Comment


          #5
          When getting my 175 out of the water I've noticed that having the trailer in a long way makes winching easier but the boat is prone to drift off to the side in strong wind or current, however, if the trailer is not in very far the drift is eliminated but its hard work on the winch and has to be winched much further.

          We try to keep the winching as easy as possible without having drift problems so don't always put the trailer in to the same depth, also, we try not to 'power load' the boat as it's light enough to do it with the winch and we try not to wash out the mud at the bottom of the ramp and leave a big hole for somebody's trailer to drop into.

          We have rollers on our trailer so its probably easier on the winch when it has to pull the boat a long way compared to skids.

          Comment


            #6
            I to have a 185 BR...

            Last year I applied silicone spray to the bunks, made them a bit slipperier...

            When my bow is within 12 inches of it's final rest when loading, I will hook the safety chain and pull slowly up and away from the ramp, then with the truck/trailer/boat on level ground or better yet a bit of downward angle it is much easier to winch that last foot (sometimes the Admiral winches and I get behind and push).

            Dennis in SC

            Comment


              #7
              I never power load my 175. As other posters said, it's a balance between in deep enough to load but not too deep that it drifts. When it drifts, I'm never alone so a couple of shoves on the landing gets it straightened out on the trailer.

              Another comment about power loading, some places don't allow it, so it's good to be able to do it another way. Of course, it also depends on someone being there to enforce the 'no power loading' but you never know when a park/DNR officer may be nearby, lol

              Comment


                #8
                We have the 185 as well.

                Since we occasionally are loading with a swift river current or choppy lake conditions, the guides we put on help a lot. Just dunk the trailer to get the pads wet and then pull out (making sure I can see the fenders). She goes right on straight whether power loading or just guiding on with lines. We always winch up the last couple of feet, no prob since the pads are wet.

                Thought about getting a power winch for the husband for Christmas one year just for fun

                Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/667459=25747-photo.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/667459=25748-yy.jpg[/img]

                Comment


                  #9
                  Back the trailer down till the fenders are just about under.

                  No powerloading for our baby.

                  Just a smooth slide up on the bunks.

                  Snug it up with the winch.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I am usually on my own. Even with the family in tow the Admiral is not comfortable driving the boat or the truck. Therefore power loading is not something I have tried. Fortunately our ramp has two finger docks breaking up the six lanes. I am always able to get a lane adjacent to a dock and push her off and on the trailer by pulling the lines down the dock. Trailer goes in deep enough that I only have to winch her two feet or less.

                    I have had issues in the past where the bow came off the rest when I pulled up the ramp. Fixed this by putting the trailer a little less in the water when retrieving.

                    My new trailer is scheduled to be ready for 4/6. New one comes with guide posts. Waiting to see how the new setup will change my routine. Dealer (who is also the trailer mechanic) is meeting me at the ramp to swap the boat onto the new trailer and ensure everything is set up correctly.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I would agree with everyone else. If you have bunks, dunk them completely before pulling the boat on, wet bunks are easier to slide on then dry bunks. The angle of the boat ramp has a lot to determine how far you have to back in. The steeper the ramp, the further you have to go in, unless you are Hercules. At my ramp, I will crank the boat all the way to the bow stop and attach the safety chain to the bow eye. Before I pull up the ramp.

                      Pull the trailer up the ramp slowly, and nine times out of ten the boat will self center on the trailer. If the current or wind is a problem, if possible use a ramp where there is a pier on the wind side of the boat. It is easier to hold onto the dock lines then is to keep pushing the boat off the pier. Keep the dock lines attached to the boat, and the helpers will hold the lines until the boat is snug on the trailer or up the ramp.

                      The Admiral will throw the dock lines into the boat as I pull up the ramp.
                      Gregg
                      2006 225 BR
                      XT Package
                      5.0 MPI
                      Alpha I Gen II
                      39.41130 N
                      76.35131W

                      Comment


                        #12
                        CPonsig wrote:
                        I am usually on my own. Even with the family in tow the Admiral is not comfortable driving the boat or the truck. Therefore power loading is not something I have tried. Fortunately our ramp has two finger docks breaking up the six lanes. I am always able to get a lane adjacent to a dock and push her off and on the trailer by pulling the lines down the dock. Trailer goes in deep enough that I only have to winch her two feet or less.

                        I have had issues in the past where the bow came off the rest when I pulled up the ramp. Fixed this by putting the trailer a little less in the water when retrieving.

                        My new trailer is scheduled to be ready for 4/6. New one comes with guide posts. Waiting to see how the new setup will change my routine. Dealer (who is also the trailer mechanic) is meeting me at the ramp to swap the boat onto the new trailer and ensure everything is set up correctly.
                        Chris,

                        I understand (no I don't really) that many of the ladies aren't comfy driving the boat or the tow rig with the boat. I hope it least all the gals know the basics, just in case. You want to be prepared for anything. Not good to be out on the water and have an situation come up where she is required to take over either of the wheels and then is not confident taking over.

                        Just sayin...be safe ´ÿè

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I think with the smaller trailers you dunk your trailer so the bunks are soaked and I bring it back up so I just see the fenders peek up above the waterline a inch then drive it straight on I get about 4 inches from the roller and then it pretty easy to winch it up, I think a good tip is to check your bunks to make sure there tight before you bring it down the ramp each time in the parking lot You know one time they can be tight the next loose, this can save you money in the long run, Ive seen someone loose a bunk while retrieveing there boat, thats when I started checking it

                          Comment


                            #14
                            mullhaupt wrote:
                            I think a good tip is to check your bunks to make sure there tight before you bring it down the ramp each time in the parking lot You know one time they can be tight the next loose, this can save you money in the long run, Ive seen someone loose a bunk while retrieveing there boat, thats when I started checking it
                            That's a damn good tip! When I soloed my boat most of the time, I checked. But when Tara took over truck duties (and she is damn good!) I failed to put that into the routine. Really makes sense, thanks!
                            Jeff & Tara
                            (And Ginger too)
                            Lake Havasu City, AZ

                            2000 Bayliner 3388
                            "GetAway"
                            Cummins 4bta 250s

                            In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Get side posts for the trl,and get it in AS FAR as you can....some lakes discourage power loading.

                              Comment

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