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    Difference between 4588/4788

    We want to buy a “new to us” Bayliner. We are deciding between a 4588 and a 4788. We live in Jacksonville, Fl.
    - what are the pros and cons? - Who has one for sale?

    thank you in advance
    Tim and Susie

    #2
    Originally posted by Tpeeler01 View Post
    We want to buy a “new to us” Bayliner. We are deciding between a 4588 and a 4788. We live in Jacksonville, Fl.
    - what are the pros and cons? - Who has one for sale?

    thank you in advance
    Tim and Susie
    The 4788 was just the natural progression from the 4588.That is the best way to think about it.

    Yes things changed a bit, but many things remained the same.

    The interiors are very similar with the understanding that they added 2’ to the salon area.


    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    where are we right now?

    https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    Comment


      #3
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	561208 The real difference that I see is that the design goals changed. The 4588 was designed for crushing efficiency. Smaller engines, rounded chines aft and prop tunnels. But responses from buyers was to go fast. So the 1994 4788 got rid of the prop tunnels, rounded chines , got bigger engines and can go faster. The flat aft section goes on plane faster, and rolls less in a seaway.
      The 4788 changed from Hino 310 hp to Cummins 340 or 370 hp in about 1997. The Hino is solid, easy to service engine, but the maine parts on it are getting harder to locate. The Cummins is familiar to service but came from Bayliner overproped (to get more speed) but over stressed the engine. At about 1500 hours they may need a rebuild.
      This is a great design. A solid boat is a joy.
      Because of their age, expected to replace most of the equipment.
      My 4788 is a 1995 model with the full teak interior. The previous owner did some nice upgrades, granite counter tops through out, teak blinds, teak wainscoting in the hall.
      My upgrades include TV lift, new stereo and all new electronics.

      I enjoy working on the boat. Good therapy for a guy who pushes a computer mouse all day.

      Comment


      • smitty477
        smitty477 commented
        Editing a comment
        FWIW - the 4588 had 'larger' engines in displacement compared to either of the powerplants used in the 4788 boats (Hino or Cummins).
        The main engine parts for the Hino are available should they ever be required.

      #4
      As Kevin said the 4788 is the newer model of similar design. A 4788 in reasonable condition can be had starting around $150K on the east coast and goes up from there. The 4588 ended production in 1993, I think. Good condition 4588 expect to pay $100K+. There are a few examples less than that but need significant work. Many listings are overpriced. A lot. Get on several of each model and spend some time looking at everything. This forum has great info on what to look for.
      Irony
      1989 Bayliner 4588 - EH700TI
      Portsmouth, NH

      Comment


        #5
        Wood! Lots of wood on the exterior of the 4588. Pretty to look at, but needs work every couple years. Keep your eyes peeled for boats, you are on the great loop so only matter of time when one near by will pop up for sale. And don’t worry if it a few states north of you, it’s smooth sailing up and down the coast, unlike the Pacific.
        There was one for sale up in Tampa for 60k for the longest time, must of been in pretty poor shape.


        https://chattanooga.craigslist.org/b...061689453.html

        Esteban
        Huntington Beach, California
        2018 Element 16
        Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
        Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

        Comment


          #6
          Originally posted by HolliganLee View Post
          Click image for larger version

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ID:	561209Click image for larger version

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Views:	289
Size:	337.7 KB
ID:	561208 The real difference that I see is that the design goals changed. The 4588 was designed for crushing efficiency. Smaller engines, rounded chines aft and prop tunnels. But responses from buyers was to go fast. So the 1994 4788 got rid of the prop tunnels, rounded chines , got bigger engines and can go faster. The flat aft section goes on plane faster, and rolls less in a seaway.
          The 4788 changed from Hino 310 hp to Cummins 340 or 370 hp in about 1997. The Hino is solid, easy to service engine, but the maine parts on it are getting harder to locate. The Cummins is familiar to service but came from Bayliner overproped (to get more speed) but over stressed the engine. At about 1500 hours they may need a rebuild.
          This is a great design. A solid boat is a joy.
          Because of their age, expected to replace most of the equipment.
          My 4788 is a 1995 model with the full teak interior. The previous owner did some nice upgrades, granite counter tops through out, teak blinds, teak wainscoting in the hall.
          My upgrades include TV lift, new stereo and all new electronics.

          I enjoy working on the boat. Good therapy for a guy who pushes a computer mouse all day.
          I would agree with that. The 4588 was introduced during a period of time when “trawlers” were popular, most of them coming out of Taiwan. The 4588 was an american made boat meant to capture part of that market, and it dod a very good job of that.

          As time went on people’s boat buying desires changed and most manufacturers started putting larger and larger engines in their boats in order to achieve the speed people wanted to buy. That trend continues today.

          My only disagreement is the rounded chines part. The 4788 retained the rounded chines of it’s very popular predecessor.

          It’s funny but when I repowered my 4788 I seriously considered going with Cummins 210 HP engines instead of the 330’s it came with OEM because I see the 45/4788 as a great trawler style bat.

          KEVIN SANDERS
          4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
          www.transferswitch4less.com

          where are we right now?

          https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by Tpeeler01 View Post
            We want to buy a “new to us” Bayliner. We are deciding between a 4588 and a 4788. We live in Jacksonville, Fl.
            - what are the pros and cons? - Who has one for sale?

            thank you in advance
            Tim and Susie
            ABBOAT here on BOC has a very nice 4588 for sale. https://www.boattrader.com/boat/1993...-4588-7355254/
            Good Luck

            Comment


              #8
              This post we wrote a very long time back , hope it helps...


              Bayliner 45 - 47 significant list

              This is a partial list of the significant improvements on the Bayliner 47 Pilothouse compared to its 45 Pilothouse predecessor. For these reasons we determined it was well worth the time, money, and effort to move from our Bayliner 4588 to a 4788 Pilothouse. This is only a partial list and does not include anything deemed insignificant such as carpets, wall treatments, furniture color selection or the like.
              Bayliner 45 – produced 1984 to 1993
              Bayliner 47 – produced 1994 to 2002 (then as Meridian for another few years)

              There were changes made in each model year but these are some of the general differences between the mid 80's 45 and the mid 90's 47 Bayliners.

              45 has:
              - aluminum holding tank below pilot stairs
              - aluminum water tanks
              - split A/C units port of port engine
              - batteries stb of stb engine
              - prop pockets
              - a decent davit
              - wood base flybridge seats
              - wood core in flybridge and elsewhere
              - wood veneer on port and stb overhangs
              - less space pilot and saloon
              - usually gensets have no shield
              - arch rear facing and needs attention
              - teak cap on rails
              - more storage
              - “V” struts
              - 1-1/2 “ shafts
              - watch for dry turbo’s early years
              - neat shaft pockets inside to collect water

              47 has:
              - no prop pockets
              - 2" shafts
              - less storage
              - A/C units are under seats in pilot and master
              - batteries at rear of engines
              - there is a bulkhead door
              - most gensets have shield
              - molded seating on flybridge
              - arch is forward and braced
              - decking is foam core
              - more robust davit
              - extra space in saloon and pilothouse
              - less space in mid stateroom
              - more useable space on flybridge
              - 95' and down still has all the teak
              - most water leaks were corrected

              Engine options:
              You will find that either Hino engine will provide many years of service if they are not overloaded and reasonably maintained. Get good surveys on the boat and the engines and you will be in good shape to assess your future plans. Disclaimer is that we are not diesel technicians nor in the marine business.
              The EH700 series Hino is a bit more robust then the WO6 series but either are more than capable when utilized at their respective ratings. Our experience is that they are well above average in this sub 6.5 litre diesel class for most normal usage. The EH700 series shares no parts with the newer WO6 series engines but the 175 and 220 EH share parts as does the 250 and 310 WO6.

              The EH700 (229 hp, 6.44 L) was based on an early 1980's stationary industrial engine for pumping, electrical generation, and similar applications. It was utilized as a non turbo in 122 hp continuous and 142 hp intermittent ratings in many applications when my husband (Ron) first saw them in Shimodate Japan in 1979-1981. The marine versions of 175 and 220 hp (turbo & inter-cooled) have shown good service life, low fuel use, and better than average serviceability, with reasonable maintenance applied. The 175 and 220 are mostly the same except for the turbo, inter-cooler, and fuel load applied. The earlier 220's with dry turbo’s can have more problems as well as the regular issues with 2 piece risers, mani-coolers, trans coolers, and lack of general service.

              The WO6 D-Ti-II (310 hp, 5.76 L) is still a very robust engine that has a bit more efficiency owing to the extra dozen years of engineering development but should not make a large difference in these applications. The 250 hp version has a number of differences other then fuel load including oiling, sparges, pistons, etc. Running at 60% or so of max hp (not rpm’s) these engines will have a life exceeding that of the boat if maintained.. We have found these to be slightly easier to service but again the difference is not large.

              We have owned the 175's for 4 seasons in a 38XX Bayliner, the 220's for 6 seasons in a 45XX, and the 310's for 6 in a 47XX.
              Northport NY

              Comment


                #9
                This is likely a minor thing, but I found it both a little funny and ultimately part of my decision to go with the 47.

                We were shopping for a few years and zeroing in on the 45 / 47 as our favored choice, I had just read an article about the differences, many of them are are A little subtle, one of the things I read was the 45 has this small ledge at the top of the stair between the saloon and PH. Only about 1 inch, and was known to be a trip hazard. That very same day we went out and looked at a very nice 45,well maintained, great records, but guess what, I went up into the pilot house and sure enough, tripped on that small ledge, went down on my knees, no injury other than pride, but it did give me pause to think about.

                likely would be a short learning curve to train self to always step over it, but what about guests that aren’t familiar? Given the significant difference in price it was not the only factor, but it was a part of the decision. The 45s from my research at that time, if they are in good condition, are a wonderful value. They have some important age related things to have checked for if you choose one of them over a 47, but hey $50k or so saved buys a lot of upgrades, fuel and fun.
                4788 PH 2001, Cummins 370's

                MMSI: 338013392
                Call sign: Sea Daze

                Exploring the Salish Sea

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