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reviewing a well used Bayliner 2556...

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  • Traxxas
    replied
    This might help with those hole shots. Or for when that punk kid tries to overtake you in his dads boat...

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Originally posted by ALASKAN_ADVENTURER View Post

    Not enough motor, a 454 or 383 is needed in these boats, been there done that
    Since we keep reviving this old thread I’ll give my opinion🙃🤪
    May personal experience is if the 2556 is fitted with a Bravo drive the 5.7 does the job quite well. My 5.7 Bravo 2 combo came out of the hole very quick and I cruised 3600-3800 rpm at 28-31 mph depending on conditions. The earlier boats fitted with the Alphas didn’t perform as well.

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  • ALASKAN_ADVENTURER
    replied
    Originally posted by dwcjwerfner View Post
    Hi, new to the forum and bigger boats. I know this thread is a bit old, but I am going to look at a 1988 today with a 5.7 that is supposed to only have 80 hours on a brand new motor. Is there specific issues that you owners know that I should be looking for?
    Not enough motor, a 454 or 383 is needed in these boats, been there done that

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  • Matchbox
    commented on 's reply
    Start your own thread. Ask the question, tell us the year and what size boat.. just a start

  • talman
    replied
    A very good write up. On a rainy night, we could set 4 chairs in each corner of the cockpit with a table in the middle and serve dinner in a covered space; the best cockpit in a trailerable boat, period.
    Another note, the dinette is the largest berth, by far. The cushions pull out and reveal some removable back supports which open up over a foot more space. We rolled up our bedding into that space for quick deployment, and a huge bed.
    Click image for larger version

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  • dwcjwerfner
    replied
    Hi, new to the forum and bigger boats. I know this thread is a bit old, but I am going to look at a 1988 today with a 5.7 that is supposed to only have 80 hours on a brand new motor. Is there specific issues that you owners know that I should be looking for?

    Leave a comment:


  • builderdude
    replied
    Originally posted by Macaw586 View Post
    How many gallons are in the 1994 fuel tank...
    My 93 has 105 gallon fuel tank, yours should be the same.

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  • Macaw586
    replied
    Ohh and I did replace the windscreen up on the flybridge after the pictures above. Click image for larger version

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  • Macaw586
    replied
    This is my second 2556 Command bridge, Wild Eagle is a 1994, the prior one was an '86 with OMC. Now I got a Merc 7.4 with Bravo 3X.

    My problem with this one is trying to drain the fuel tank after a long layover. The gage shows 1/3 of a tank,

    How many gallons are in the 1994 fuel tank so I can have enough "gas cans" ready when I start the syphon operation.

    Getting ready to launch "Wild Eagle" and have a well at the Lac Sainte Claire Harbor for the year. All set with the engine running great, I by-passed the fuel tank and ran her for about a 1/2 hour with a supplemental tank and a touch of Seafoam. Purrs like a kitten. But have to drain the tank so I can get fresh gas on the way to the launch. Otherwise good to go for this year, looking forward to having a wonderful year because last year was a total bummer.

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  • 88fourwinns
    replied
    Originally posted by Bruce Chilcott View Post
    Hello
    Just bought a 1986 2556 Trophy here in Colorado. Beautiful indoor stored boat but bought about 80 gallons of bad Lake Powell gas. Pumped bad gas, changed fuel pump,filters and rebuilt carburetor still have restricted fuel flow . We are pulling supply lines. Anything we are missing or should know? Bruce stuck in Mancos
    check the anti siphon valve on the gas tank, the fuel line from the fuel pump to the tank will be connected to it. A spring loaded valve that can stick and restrict fuel flow.
    Click image for larger version

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  • Centerline2
    replied
    Originally posted by Bruce Chilcott View Post
    Hello
    Just bought a 1986 2556 Trophy here in Colorado. Beautiful indoor stored boat but bought about 80 gallons of bad Lake Powell gas. Pumped bad gas, changed fuel pump,filters and rebuilt carburetor still have restricted fuel flow . We are pulling supply lines. Anything we are missing or should know? Bruce stuck in Mancos

    sometimes when a boat is stored for long periods the fuel lines will dry out and then can suck a bit of air at the clamped ends... not a restriction but it wont create enough vacuum to suck fuel either....

    to see if you do have a restriction, you should be able to take the line loose from the fuel pump and then use air (or your mouth) and blow back into the tank. this will either dislodge what may be there, or you will see there is a solid restriction in that area.... do the same for the line between the pump and the carb.... if the lines are hard and not very flexible, you should replace them with new marine rated fuel line....

    some carbs have a filter right inside the inlet port that can get missed when disassembling the carb... if this is gummed up, it wont pass fuel.... I have seen some fuel pumps with a filter fitting on the inlet side, and the same goes for it, if it is equipped with one....

    if a small piece of debris gets under the diaphragm valve in the fuel pump, it wont pump... priming the engine to get it it to fire and run can usually unseat the debris and let the pump do its thing...

    sometimes after setting for a long time, it may just need to have the engine primed by squirting a bit of fuel down the throat of the carb with a squeeze bottle.... if your timing is good, you will be able to keep the engine running until the fuel pump supplies the fuel. (be careful of a back fire where it may catch the primer bottle on fire). if manually priming the engine doesnt make it fire up, then your problem is most likely in the ignition system.......

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  • Bruce Chilcott
    replied
    Hello
    Just bought a 1986 2556 Trophy here in Colorado. Beautiful indoor stored boat but bought about 80 gallons of bad Lake Powell gas. Pumped bad gas, changed fuel pump,filters and rebuilt carburetor still have restricted fuel flow . We are pulling supply lines. Anything we are missing or should know? Bruce stuck in Mancos

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Very nice write up! We absolutely LOVE our 2556 and so do all of our slip neighbors, we get compliments almost every time we stay down for the weekend.

    And honestly, without the help of all of the members on this board, we wouldn't be able to enjoy it as much as we do.

    I purchased my 2556 for $5k and have invested roughly $16k in bringing it back to life (Transom seal, gas tank, bellows, electrical, etc). I have not seen a boat anywhere near what the 2556 offers for even half that investment.

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  • Ruffryder
    replied
    Great 2556 write up! & why this model is still popular, still hold their value.

    Skipjack 26 fly is still being made if someone wants to spend nearly 200K. her beam is about 12" narrower so she is gonna be tippy.

    Cutwater CB30 is about the next closest comes to my mind, but with app 18inches less beam than my 3058, $300K price tag.

    2556 has somewhat similar lines to my 3058

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Great write up on the 2556, I agree it's a killer little boat set up for long weekends up to several days on board. Yes, the concrete in the ass end does not help with the "stern heavy" boat scenario. I've also found many areas hidden by cabinetry etc. that could be used for storage of not so heavy stuff. I've already been busy modifying some of these areas myself to gain more useful storage. My "removeable fish box" has not seen its home since I purchased the boat in 2013, the space below is way more valuable for removable storage containers and myself when checking the engine oil and working on engine bay related stuff. As for the 12x12 drop fin trim tabs: I find mine work better than they need to, they're usually deployed only 1/2 way give or take to compensate for list unless I'm fully loaded with fuel, water, people, and gear then it's full down tabs to help me get up on plane quicker then back to somewhere around 1/2 way again once I'm trimmed up where things feel good. Something I've been considering on the anchor locker is this: if a windlass is in the future, one should consider using a small amount of space in the forward portion of the V birth area to build a new below deck anchor locker for rode drop and storage, if a fair amount of chain is used (weight) it will likely help the boat plane quicker and improve its attitude during cruising speeds. The grab rails are sufficient when walking around to the bow but I agree that most of us would prefer them above the flybridge windscreen (bridge rail) another project on my to do list :lol:

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