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  • RobMick
    started a topic Heydey boat owners?

    Heydey boat owners?

    0 topics 0 comments....interesting...being that this line of boats was to put the entire competition to shame based on price and performance...have they sold any of these ugly floating refrigerators?

  • Download_Complete
    replied
    My take on Heydays are they are new, "raw" (to use your words), and purpose built. I am willing to forgive some stylistic quirks to have that kind of innovation on the market. I personally don't like them, but I do think the WT-Surf is a pretty good looking boat, so maybe it's a matter of proportions.

    THey ARE eye catching, and I do hope their concept of easilly swapped graphics packages are migrated over to the rest of the Bayliner line for customization purposes.

    Welcome to the group! Stick around...we need more Heyday'ers here!

    Leave a comment:


  • WT2surfer
    replied
    Hi all, I came across this forum online regarding Heyday and thought I should share a few thoughts. I own a 2017 WT2. My wife and I were originally looking at purchasing a used Axis A22 or A20. We visited the Sacramento Boat show and came across the Heyday booth. I will admit that it isn't the most attractive boat on the water, but that is in the eye of the beholder. To be honest, it was just plain raw. It didn't have gimmicks or tricks. It wasn't a show boat and didn't pretend to be. It had some features that we really liked. The layout on the WT2 is the most social layout on any boat in its class. Period. We go to the lake to be with our family and friends and this boat was built for that. My wife fell in love with the hot-tub seats and this thing throws a very nice wakesurf wave and wakeboard wake. It had a very good warranty and was powered by a PCM engine. We have had nothing but compliments whenever we take it to the lake. I am constantly stopped at the gas station by folks who ask me how much it cost, who makes it and so on. I catch people taking pictures of it while towing down the freeway, around town or at the marina. Anyone who has ridden in it loves it. I took delivery in June of 17' and have had 74 problem free hours on the motor. I have made a few changes to the boat such as stereo and ballast, but overall it is solid right out of the gate. My buddy who owns a Nautique 210 said it looks "gangster"

    Anyway. That is just my opinion. I am not going to knock other boats since all boats have their strengths and weaknesses, but at the end of the day we are all here to have a great day on the water and this boat delivers. Happy boating all!

    Leave a comment:


  • freechip
    replied
    I'll add since I didn't see it (could just be me) that forum participation and/or lack of participation certainly don't represent how a certain vessel and/or brand is doing.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Download_Complete
    replied
    Originally posted by ksflyboy View Post
    We own a 2016 WT-1. Use to own a Malibu Waksetter 20MXZ. Was a great boat but 18 months ago got laid off and had to sell it. Worked a second job last summer and paid off wife’s student loans. Started looking again last fall and found Heyday. My wife would have been happy with a stern drive to wakeboard behind, I am the one who wanted a surf boat. Demo’d one in October last fall and surf wave looked good enough we took a chance and bought a leftover new 2016 with all options except the dash tablet for $35k out the door. We live on a sandpit in a boating community. The WT-1 is the perfect size for our lake and throws a nice surf wake. The center seat is great for forward visibility and the family loves the individual seats. Several Mastercraft owners have told us the surf wave looks good. It has great push and the boat is very nimble on the water. Definitely a bit odd looking, but nobody has a boat like ours. Think it will be a nice keeper.
    Ladies and gents, stop the presses and hold all phone calls, we have our first Heyday owner!

    A very warm welcome to you. Thanks for coming by, and I hope you will participate in our forums more!

    Leave a comment:


  • ksflyboy
    replied
    We own a 2016 WT-1. Use to own a Malibu Waksetter 20MXZ. Was a great boat but 18 months ago got laid off and had to sell it. Worked a second job last summer and paid off wife’s student loans. Started looking again last fall and found Heyday. My wife would have been happy with a stern drive to wakeboard behind, I am the one who wanted a surf boat. Demo’d one in October last fall and surf wave looked good enough we took a chance and bought a leftover new 2016 with all options except the dash tablet for $35k out the door. We live on a sandpit in a boating community. The WT-1 is the perfect size for our lake and throws a nice surf wake. The center seat is great for forward visibility and the family loves the individual seats. Several Mastercraft owners have told us the surf wave looks good. It has great push and the boat is very nimble on the water. Definitely a bit odd looking, but nobody has a boat like ours. Think it will be a nice keeper.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffw
    commented on 's reply
    Perhaps you could fill us in a bit more on your background, obviously you were a Bayliner employee. We toured the Roseburg plant in 2008, great experience.

  • Woodiver
    replied
    Not sure which plant you toured but it sounds like Navassa which was purchased from KCS and was planned to be the home for all Meridian and cruiser production. Only a handful of models transitioned to Navassa before things hit the wall.
    USM started the lean transition during the 2000’s and it was light years ahead of traditional building. Some plants were further along than others but it didn’t help them survive. The Pipestone facility was the leanest plant in BBG but it closed.
    USM plants were smaller than SR plants and not set up for line flow. They were also too far away from the markets. Most boats are sold or ship off the east coast (most international RORO shipments go out of east coast ports, even to Australia ). Shipping is very expensive and distance to markets killed the Arlington, Roseburg and Pipestone plants. Trophy which was built in Cumberland MD moved to the saltwater group and moved to Sea Pro for a short time prior to the move to Triton.
    Even though many on this board think the West coast is the market, it isn’t.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmcb
    replied
    I don't think any bubble was burst because I don't recall anyone saying they made a lot of money. Boats cost more than a customer can pay. Boats were built quite like motorhomes I have seen being built. A crew installs something where ever they drill the hole that day. That was why no two boats were alike and what one owner would offer for help in an area didn't match another owners boat.
    What someone has to do is find ways to build a good product at less cost so a customer can afford them. Motorhomes also have increased in cost so much they price themselves out of many buyers ability.
    All that said, Bayliner in 2008 did some things that would have reduced costs. They had a new plant I was privileged to visit when invited to do a boat test. We were given a tour of a new plant. Being from a mfg background I immediately saw things that were foreign to building boats (and motorhomes). I knew someone with automotive experience was involved and it turned out it was the plant manager who I had the privilege to spend some time with on a one on one basis.
    What he started (and the entire plant had not changed so there was a great comparison with both methods) was to build components of the boat off the boat and install them as a package. Example the bathroom would be complete when it went on the boat. Templates were made so all holes were drilled in the same place on every boat. So each were in the best position. It made a better product and at much less cost. I also noticed this new plant had new workers. These people were working at a good pace and even more important taking the time to do it right. I saw a worker go back and touch up his work because he wasn't satisfied. He wanted it right.
    More happy customers and less repairs which cut costs.
    I have an example of how much difference this makes and its a motorhome example. I test drove a motorhome I was interested in but couldn't get the seat back far enough to be comfortable driving it. It was a deal breaker for me. I liked the brand and had a couple new ones previously. I was at the factory and sat in another and I had lots of room. Fine, I ordered one. I went to the factory and watched it being build. I sat in the seat and didn't have leg room again. I then saw why. When the seat was installed the guy drilling the holes moved it over just enough that the edge of the slideout just behind the drivers seat hit the slidout and couldn't be moved back as far as one moved over a couple inches. I contacted an engineer and explained what I saw. They moved my seat and plugged the holes. He said he would make up a templet so that didn't happen again.
    That almost cost them a sale.
    But it illustrates how much this can improve a product and in the case of the Bayliner save a lot of money.
    Bayliner was really on to something that could have duplicated in all their plants. Unfortunately It didn't happen because a short time later that plant was closed because of lack of sales with the rest to follow.
    Enough improvement to save them? Likely not. Maybe if it had happened 10 years earlier and continued to improve as it could. Maybe they could have weathered the recession better. But you still have to make a product a customer can afford. Not just raise the price.
    I remember working at GM,, when times were tough we would tell sales to just sell it at cost. We will make improvements that will make the profit. That always happened. Nothing beats a work force that is always looking to improve what they are doing. A strong suggestion program does work. If an employee cares like I saw at the Bayliner factory, well that works too. New plant, new employees, no union telling them not to kill the job. Its all a factor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodiver
    replied
    I could tell you so much but, I can’t.




    What a can say is during the period 8 to 10 years ago, dealer financing rules changed (not really but were enforced). Dealers were scared to bring in configured products like cruiser vs cheap 175’s since they would be on the hook for curtailment fees if the boat didn’t sell in time.




    Manufacturing footprint changes within BC caused selling costs to increase along with Mercury increases due to environmental requirements.




    Bayliner and SR have always competed in the same lower end markets, some times selling products at a loss just to compete. Not a smart move for BC other than the engine play. Sorry to break your bubble but boat companies don’t make a lot of profit, it’s all in the engine.



    Leave a comment:


  • dmcb
    replied
    Originally posted by Ruffryder View Post
    We don't have Bayliner cruisers anymore, just because Brunswick want all of you to buy a Sea Ray Sundancer.
    $100,000 for a 30' cruiser? ... not even close!
    a brand new Sundancer 320 will set you back $400,000
    Very few on this site can afford that. Those who can don't get that way by doing it. Brunswick made a big mistake. They should have sacked Sea Ray first and kept Bayliner and built cruisers people could afford. Now they are both gone.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmcb
    replied
    Originally posted by Woodiver View Post
    Seadealercost.com but their costs are from copies of dealer price lists and do not include program or non program discounts to dealers.
    And that is where the real savings are. Sometimes these are more than the retail markup.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruffryder
    replied
    We don't have Bayliner cruisers anymore, just because Brunswick want all of you to buy a Sea Ray Sundancer.
    $100,000 for a 30' cruiser? ... not even close!
    a brand new Sundancer 320 will set you back $400,000

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodiver
    replied
    Seadealercost.com but their costs are from copies of dealer price lists and do not include program or non program discounts to dealers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Download_Complete
    replied
    Originally posted by 6104696 View Post
    The "new v. used" debate is as old as the hills. IMO....the cheapest way into boating is to buy a used boat. I buy new because I can. I am not stupid nor foolish for doing so; for me, it's worth the extra $$ to get exactly what I want, without wasting time driving all over the place looking at other people's intepretation of "cream puff," and then spending my precious time cleaning up the messes left behind of the previous owners. I like clean boats. I have bought numerous used boats, and enjoyed them immensely. Now I usually buy new, and enjoy them immensely. I buy new simply because I can, and because it is worth it to me.

    Boating is an expensive and largely "luxury" or "leisure" activity. Who is anyone to judge what is a "wise" waste of money vs. a foolish waste of money?

    For those who are fortunate enough to be able to buy new, that is their choice and worth it to them. For others, it is worth their time to buy used. Fine with me. I need the secondary market when it comes time to sell my boat. For the secondary market, they need people to buy new so that there is a secondary market.

    And people who buy my used boats are usually lucky as heck, because they are getting one of the cleanest and best maintained boats around.......
    Agreed, and you made my point for me. We are at a point - and Bayliner's sales numbers that I saw supports this - that there are too many people flocking to the used market. It is artificially driving prices up on used boats.

    And despite Doug's assertion, there is widespread misinformation on new boats and shopping. On a car, it's easy. I have 5-6 websites to look at, and I can play dealers off each other. You don't really get that luxury with a boat.....when they find out where you live, if you are out of region, they refer you to the selling dealer in your area. THere is only 1 website you can go to that gives you an approximate dealer cost.

    IF you are a new entry into the boating market, I can totally understand how there would be a lot of misunderstanding.

    Leave a comment:

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