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2007 Trophy 1902 - Wet transom wood, black mold

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    2007 Trophy 1902 - Wet transom wood, black mold

    Hello All,

    A buddy and I installed a new fish finder / GPS unit today and while running cable discovered that inside is covered with what looks to be black mold. When we pre-drilled new holes in the transom for the transducer mount screws a couple of the holes produce wet wood shavings. Now I noticed that the previous owner didn't put any silicone around screw holes of the previous unit or the screws that hold the wire in place. Also noticed that all the o-rings on each of the access panel things (don't know what they are called) are all dried out and cracked.

    Do you think that is whats causing the moisture? It's a new boat for me and the previous owners only put about 80hrs on it (retired couple).

    Side note, when I access the area where batteries are kept there is a faint smell of gasoline. That's not good right?

    #2
    wet transoms are common but not desirable, but they can still be/remain structurally sound for many years..... soft transoms are no longer structurally sound.

    the cutout where the outdrive passes thru is not sealed either, so the wood in the transom is exposed to moisture when the bilge has water in it....

    wet wood can remain solid for many many years, but when in contact with moist air/oxygen, it will deteriorate at a much faster rate....

    and holes/screws in the transom, inside or outside the hull, should be sealed to minimize the issues... the orings are a simple and clean way to seal around screws and bolts long enough for the warranty to expire, which is all some manufactures really care about, BECAUSE all most buyers care about is a LOW purchase price... if everything on a boat was built to abyc/preferred standards, it would cost thousands more to build...
    as long as the transom is solid, there is no need to worry about it failing anytime soon, and there is no reason to dig into trying to repair it until it becomes soft because its likely that you only will introduce more air which will speed the deterioration of it... and a full on transom rebuild will only be replacing a structurally sound (but wet) transom, with a structurally sound DRY transom, that will get wet.... its best to wait til there is a problem before opening it up.

    as for the black mold?.. is this on the inside wall of the transom? this is common on older boats that have had a damp or dirty bilge for several years of its life, and the mold is usually growing on a fine layer of dust or other contaminate that has settled on the surface over time .... a good pressure washing will easily get rid of it, AND then place a box fan in there to dry it all out good....


    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


    • FishFearMe77
      FishFearMe77 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the information Centerline2. I have 2 outboards and though it's a 2007 the boat only has 80hrs on it. It was stored outside with cover for many years however it looks brand new with the exception on the inside. The mold isn't bad but it concerned me. I noticed a lot of the hoses look like they could use replacing and the fuel/water separator has a 2017 date on it! Im betting the moisture is from the deck plates with no orings..water has been slowly seeping in over the years.

      Is it normal to have a slight smell of fuel when down in that compartment? I always smell it a little but within 5 minutes of an access point being open it disappears. Should I be worried?

    #3
    Eeeewww! I wouldn't touch that thing. First of all, try to find the source of mold. Moisture can actually cause it, and damage a lot of things, not only a fish finder. Use rubber gloves and mold removing sprays. You can find them in any supermarket. Also, do not use ozone generators to get rid of the mold and other stuff. I’ve seen recently that someone advises these things to get rid of mold, fungus, and insects, but those people don’t know what they are talking about. So, better avoid ozone generators and try something else instead. Check online on damagecontrol-911.com for some other tips and advice in your case.

    Comment


      #4
      Old thread....
      Genuine harmful black mold will be rare on a boat.. mildew, which is common on boats can also be black... boats that dont get a good cleaning from time to time will have it growing where its commonly damp, even on bare fiberglass or painted fiberglass...
      Commonly, the surface of fiberglass, as it ages will collect dust and other airborn particles, and this will easily grow mildew, which then starts to grow faster as it spores out...
      a good pressure washing will remove most of it, or a good scrubbing with bleach water... black mold or mildew, dont be afraid to get rid of it by any means that works, and as far as black mold is concerned, its not the acute exposure that is so harmful, but the prolonged exposure from allowing it to stay there and continue to grow for months/years while dropping spores....


      NU LIBERTE'
      Salem, OR

      1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
      5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
      N2K equipped throughout..
      2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
      2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
      '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
      Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

      Comment

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