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Would You Use E10 Fuel In a Carbureted 96 Mercruiser 7.4

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  • captharv
    replied
    If your engine has the Thunderbolt V ignition pack, it has a knock sensor in it and will compensate for the E10 in day-day running. I have used E10 in my 2452 with a5.7 vortec engine. I noticed no performance degradation to speak of.
    When the gas stopped having lead in i.t, I remember how the naysayers were talking about engines blowing up, needing yearly valve jobs, etc. This did not happen at least, with my old boat which was a carbureted 5.7.
    Now that said, if you are getting pinging, check the base timing on the engine. The carb can be re-jetted richer.
    However, as us engineers say, "If it ain't broke don't fix it.

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Metal bowl required on our gassers. Should be a cross reference from Merc/Sierra filter to a Racor.

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  • LOVERMAN
    commented on 's reply
    Do you know if the Racor filter fit on our mercruiser filter bases, or do you have to buy the filter base from Racor also?
    https://www.westmarine.com/buy/racor...2?recordNum=20

  • 88fourwinns
    replied
    If you are worried about using E-10, one way to deal with it is to start using the Racor filter with the metal bowl. These are better filters to start with and can hold much more water than standard ones. Even so I have not had trouble using just the standard Sierra filters. Here we have no choice, it is all E10.

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  • Centerline2
    replied
    ethanol fuel is fine as long as you are using it up quickly, but when it sets in the tank for very long is when problems can arise, and the temps in which it is at while setting there..... 2 months is about as long as I feel the ethanol fuel can be dependably stored, even though it starts to degrade within a couple of days....

    using some of the fuel and then topping it off with fresh ethanol fuel doesnt qualify as using it up quickly, because when the fuel starts to degrade and separate, adding fresh fuel does NOT make it like new again.... run the tank as low as you are comfortable with and then fill it with fresh fuel again.....

    I wont use ethanol fuel in anything except our car, which gets fresh fuel at least every week.... EXCEPT when we are boating in a location where ethanol free fuel is not available, then I have no choice but to use the sub-standard grade of fuel....

    and it causes the engine to run noticeably rougher with slightly less performance... my 2 outboard motors really notice the difference in the quality of the fuel they get...

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  • Yendrabuilt
    replied
    Change the fuel hoses, change the fuel filter more often for a while and run the E-10. I have since I got our boat. I do however live in a very dry climate which can make a difference.

    My personal preference would be to build a 12 to 1 compression engine, put in the ideal high torque cam, put on a bigger propeller and run E-85. But finding the stuff is sketchy so I wouldn't do it. I used to mechanic a 600 HP outlaw sprint car in the 70's using straight methanol.

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  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    If you plan to use E-10 during the season, I would suggest using Non-E for your last few tanks before laying up for the winter.

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  • vr5200
    replied
    Originally posted by builderdude View Post
    Never heard of fuel tank corrosion starting from the inside, these fuel tank failures seem to begin from the exterior, in particular where the rubber strips hold bilge water against the tank.
    Ethanol is corrosive to some metals.
    Pumps/tanks/hoses in the E85 distribution/consumption network have different/coated materials to tolerate the stuff.

    In fact, if you are buying a car and ordering it, pay for the E85/FlexFuel option (pretty low cost) so that you get the upgraded fuel components.
    Even if you never run E85, you will always have the higher quality components that will live "forever" in your car.

    E10 is not nearly as bad a E85, however.

    My concern would be if the inside of the tank already had a problem area caused by whatever might be sitting on the bottom of the tank since 1996.
    That zone would be more susceptible to accelerated deterioration.

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Originally posted by LOVERMAN View Post
    I would think a stock 7.4 Bravo 3 would run on 87 octane..? My biggest fear is the life of the aluminum fuel tank. I suppose I would pump the fuel out at the end of the season and burn it in the 96 ford exploder. But then, should I store the boat with an empty tank or one full of E10 with stabil....or 425 bucks worth of Non-ethanol 92 octane? GAAAAHH!!!!
    They all run on 87 in my neck of the woods, at the marinas that’s pretty much the only choice we have.

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  • builderdude
    replied
    Never heard of fuel tank corrosion starting from the inside, these fuel tank failures seem to begin from the exterior, in particular where the rubber strips hold bilge water against the tank.

    Leave a comment:


  • vr5200
    replied
    Originally posted by LOVERMAN View Post
    I need to buy 100 gallons of fuel this spring to fill up. Non-ethanol 92 octane is 4.25 per gallon. 87 octane E10 is 2.60 per gallon. That leaves me with 425-260=165 bucks to spend on a couple of feet of fuel hose, some extra fuel filters, and a carb kit for the weber. I am guessing I will burn 200 gallons or so this summer, so there is another 160 bucks. I have always run Non-ethanol 92 octane in my boats since E10 came about, but this is really tempting. I would think a stock 7.4 Bravo 3 would run on 87 octane..? My biggest fear is the life of the aluminum fuel tank. I suppose I would pump the fuel out at the end of the season and burn it in the 96 ford exploder. But then, should I store the boat with an empty tank or one full of E10 with stabil....or 425 bucks worth of Non-ethanol 92 octane? GAAAAHH!!!!
    The compromise would be to get the 100 gallons in spring and fill it up the rest of the season with pure gasoline. The effective concentration of ethanol at the end of the season would be low.

    You would get a one time savings and have minimum risk of ethanol/old aluminum interaction.

    I will let the old timers that have dealt with really old aluminum tanks share how corroded they have been when they were repaired/replaced. I do not have any direct experience.

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  • LOVERMAN
    replied
    I need to buy 100 gallons of fuel this spring to fill up. Non-ethanol 92 octane is 4.25 per gallon. 87 octane E10 is 2.60 per gallon. That leaves me with 425-260=165 bucks to spend on a couple of feet of fuel hose, some extra fuel filters, and a carb kit for the weber. I am guessing I will burn 200 gallons or so this summer, so there is another 160 bucks. I have always run Non-ethanol 92 octane in my boats since E10 came about, but this is really tempting. I would think a stock 7.4 Bravo 3 would run on 87 octane..? My biggest fear is the life of the aluminum fuel tank. I suppose I would pump the fuel out at the end of the season and burn it in the 96 ford exploder. But then, should I store the boat with an empty tank or one full of E10 with stabil....or 425 bucks worth of Non-ethanol 92 octane? GAAAAHH!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 88fourwinns
    replied
    There are a few scenarios where E10 can cause trouble:
    1) you have an old boat run on E0 for a long time and have to switch over, this can cause varnish and other junk to get cleaned from the sides of the tank and this can clog filters, plan on changing them a few times
    2) if what you get is actually E15, it can cause problems, but you might not know unless you tested the fuel
    3) if you have a leaky deck fill that allows water in the tank, it can cause big problems
    4) storage for the long term can be a problem, but I used gas that was 2.5 years old once and did not have a problem

    here's a sample of my gas (E10) and my 30+ year old Quadrajet during the last rebuild, very clean inside no corrosion.... Click image for larger version

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  • builderdude
    commented on 's reply
    Good read Norton 👍🏼

  • Norton_Rider
    replied
    Here's a great article on E10:
    https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvis...nol-Fuel-Myths

    Leave a comment:

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