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    Winterizing question re: 2000 Bayliner-2859

    New owner here of a 2000 Bayliner 2959. Could maybe use some advice and counsel on winterizing the boat. My first I/O boat and it's totally different from my previous boat with an inboard diesel (flushed antifreeze into the raw water system). Yes, we have shore power at the slip, and yes we can expect power outages at the worst possible time. Any advice? Here in Portland, Or on the Columbia river a couple of weeks of "real" winter in the norm.

    #2
    Get the Mercruiser engine manual and follow what it says for winterization.

    What engine, raw or closed cooling? Carb or MPI?

    you may want to pay a mechanic this time and learn when you have time, he might even show you how to do it if your nice to him.
    1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

    Mike

    Comment


      #3
      Ditto Mike...... buy yourself an OEM service manual for your engine via Engine serial number.

      Learn what you can about your engine's cooling system.
      Drain all seawater from all components following the OEM procedure.


      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

      Comment


        #4
        Yes to others if the boat sits in a slip consider a 1/4 turn shut of valve in the incoming hose, from the drive to pump.
        Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
        96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

        Comment


          #5
          Mike, we need to know what you have... raw water or closed cooling?
          Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
          Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
          93 3058 sold
          92 2855 (day boat)
          91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
          Longbranch WA
          Life is Good

          Comment


            #6
            I wish to hijack this thread as I am a 3 year owner of a 2859 with the 7.4 carbureted with closed cooling that I keep in the water year around in north Idaho hooked up to power. I almost had a disaster. Due to my occupation as a farmer, most of my fishing time is done in the colder half of the year. My first winter I placed a heat lamp in the engine compartment on a froststat (turns the light on when temp drops to 34). Windy cold snap hits for several days. LUCKILY, I checked on the boat before the weather warmed up because someone had unplugged my boat, but there was also an extended power outage at the same time.

            My water intake hose froze and pushed off of the raw water pump. Also my oil cooler froze and luckily only pushed the end cap off. My raw water intake hose was laying on the bottom of the bilge. If this hose would've thawed before my return, my bilge would've been filled full because there would be nothing to stop the flow of lake water into the boat. So now whenever I leave the boat in winter, I disconnect the intake hose from the raw water pump, pull it up above the water line and tie it off to make sure it cant drop to the bottom of the bilge. I also pull the end cap off of my oil cooler to drain it.

            I no longer care to depend on electricity......

            My question is...... Am I doing this the right way if I want to keep my boat "readily" available for use through the winter? Should there be a valve between the lake and my raw water pump? Is there a way to plumb in a quick way to drain all of the raw water out of the system AND protect any hose connections from freezing and pushing off?
            Eastern Washington State (GO COUGS)
            Bayliner 2859 (North Idaho)
            7.4 Closed Cool Bravo 2
            Honda 15 with TR1 (best invention ever)
            Hewescraft 21' Searunner (Crabbing, Watersports, Salmon, in that order)
            Honda 130
            Honda 9.9

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Coyote54 View Post
              I wish to hijack this thread as I am a 3 year owner of a 2859 with the 7.4 carbureted with closed cooling that I keep in the water year around in north Idaho hooked up to power. I almost had a disaster. Due to my occupation as a farmer, most of my fishing time is done in the colder half of the year. My first winter I placed a heat lamp in the engine compartment on a froststat (turns the light on when temp drops to 34). Windy cold snap hits for several days. LUCKILY, I checked on the boat before the weather warmed up because someone had unplugged my boat, but there was also an extended power outage at the same time.

              My water intake hose froze and pushed off of the raw water pump. Also my oil cooler froze and luckily only pushed the end cap off. My raw water intake hose was laying on the bottom of the bilge. If this hose would've thawed before my return, my bilge would've been filled full because there would be nothing to stop the flow of lake water into the boat. So now whenever I leave the boat in winter, I disconnect the intake hose from the raw water pump, pull it up above the water line and tie it off to make sure it cant drop to the bottom of the bilge. I also pull the end cap off of my oil cooler to drain it.

              I no longer care to depend on electricity......

              My question is...... Am I doing this the right way if I want to keep my boat "readily" available for use through the winter? Should there be a valve between the lake and my raw water pump? Is there a way to plumb in a quick way to drain all of the raw water out of the system AND protect any hose connections from freezing and pushing off?
              Is the closed coolinghalf or full, engine only or includes exhaust manifolds? If only half you should drain the manifolds. Either way the risers/elbows need to be drained.
              The heat exchanger, oil cooler, power steering cooler should all be drained.

              Instead of pulling the raw water input hose plumb it with a ball valve just make sure it sized properly.

              Freshwater and head also also need to be addressed.
              1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

              Mike

              Comment


                #8
                Perko flush pro may be the way to go if you want to be able to use it during the winter months. Personally I'd Build my own using a T and ball valves. Pull water from the outdrive for normal operation or pull in RV antifreeze mix via the ther port for freeze protection.
                https://www.go2marine.com/product/39...iABEgI0QPD_BwE
                Dave
                Edmonds, WA
                "THE FIX"
                '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                Misc. projects thread
                https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                Comment


                • Nauti_Mike
                  Nauti_Mike commented
                  Editing a comment
                  While Perko has a nice easy to use product I worry about the polymer housing, mainly the raw water side where freezing can occur.

                • builderdude
                  builderdude commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Agree Mike, the main reason I'd build my own

                #9
                Yup I would never leave the raw water hose off!
                ensure to drain the hot water heater and hydronic heater if equipped with one.
                Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
                Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
                93 3058 sold
                92 2855 (day boat)
                91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
                Longbranch WA
                Life is Good

                Comment


                  #10
                  .................................
                  Originally posted by Coyote54 View Post
                  I wish to hijack this thread as I am a 3 year owner of a 2859 with the 7.4 carbureted with closed cooling
                  We need an answer to the question...... do you have a "Full" or Half" Closed Cooling System?
                  ..... a Half System does not include the exhaust manifolds.
                  ..... a Full System would included the exhaust manifolds.
                  ..... Exhaust Elbows are always supplied with seawater, and should be drained!


                  .......... that I keep in the water year around in north Idaho hooked up to power.I almost had a disaster. Due to my occupation as a farmer, most of my fishing time is done in the colder half of the year. My first winter I placed a heat lamp in the engine compartment on a froststat (turns the light on when temp drops to 34). Windy cold snap hits for several days. LUCKILY, I checked on the boat before the weather warmed up because someone had unplugged my boat, but there was also an extended power outage at the same time.
                  What you have described is the main reason for NOT relying on electricity to protect your expensive cast iron components!
                  Ole Murphy will be right there waiting for an opportunity to raise his ugly head!

                  In the event of a power outage and freezing temps:
                  If you are lucky, you will be notified of a power outage and freezing temps at the Marina.
                  You will be grabbing tools and supplies as you get ready to head out for the boat.
                  It will be dark out, the wind will be blowing freezing droplets sideways.
                  You'll reach the boat only to find that water has already began to freeze things.
                  I'd go on, but I'm certain that you get my point!


                  My water intake hose froze and pushed off of the raw water pump. Also my oil cooler froze and luckily only pushed the end cap off. My raw water intake hose was laying on the bottom of the bilge. If this hose would've thawed before my return, my bilge would've been filled full because there would be nothing to stop the flow of lake water into the boat. So now whenever I leave the boat in winter, I disconnect the intake hose from the raw water pump, pull it up above the water line and tie it off to make sure it cant drop to the bottom of the bilge. I also pull the end cap off of my oil cooler to drain it.

                  I no longer care to depend on electricity......
                  Smart decision!

                  My question is...... Am I doing this the right way if I want to keep my boat "readily" available for use through the winter? Should there be a valve between the lake and my raw water pump? Is there a way to plumb in a quick way to drain all of the raw water out of the system AND protect any hose connections from freezing and pushing off?
                  Use caution with any "quick drain" systems.
                  We need to have the ability to probe the open drain ports as to free them from any rust scale debris that may prevent complete draining.
                  It will be more work for you each time........, but if you drain things down, you'll be able to sleep well at night!

                  Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                  2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                  Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                  Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                  Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by Nauti_Mike View Post

                    Is the closed coolinghalf or full, engine only or includes exhaust manifolds? The manifolds are cooled by antifreeze so I guess you would call it full closed cooling.

                    If only half you should drain the manifolds. Either way the risers/elbows need to be drained.I changed out the exhaust shutters (clackers) the first year on my boat while it was in the slip. I noticed while I had the couplers off that on my 2859 the lake static level rises and falls as the boat floats to within a couple inches of the top inside the Y-pipe. There's no way to drain that out below the waterline that I know of. I assume I'm relying on the temperature of the lake water to keep the Y pipe from freezing? I think it would take a prolonged and very cold episode to do that as my marina very seldom builds any ice.

                    The heat exchanger, oil cooler, power steering cooler should all be drained.I only have the main heat exchanger mounted up top/front of the engine, and my combination oil cooler/steering cooler down low on the starboard side of the engine. Thus why I pull the raw intake hose which allows the pump and starboard side of the cooling system to drain of raw water. Then I pull the front end cap on the oil cooler which allows the cooler, and the port side of the cooling system to drain of raw water. This method appears to me to drain everything of raw water as the hoses from the exhaust risers angle down and forward to the heat exchanger which then flows down to both positions that I am draining. The exhaust risers might have just a little bit of raw water that hasn't flowed over the "edge" and back into the Y Pipe or forward and down the raw hoses. The only thing I know I'm not draining is the crossover hose from the raw water pump to the oil cooler because it's a PITA to get the rear hose on and off of the oil cooler but since it's in the very bottom of the bilge seems to never be frozen (I always give it a squeeze before firing up.)

                    Instead of pulling the raw water input hose plumb it with a ball valve just make sure it sized properly. So how do I do this without having the potential for raw water freezing on the back side of the ball valve and pushing the hose off just as what happened previously to the raw pump? The intake hose will be full all the way to the valve as it is below the waterline.

                    Freshwater and head also also need to be addressed. Yep, that gets RV antifreezed every fall.
                    Thanks folks for the suggestions. I'm just trying to figure a better way to do this and what would be most proper for a freshwater year round boat in a location with the potential for extended below freezing temps during the time I want it to be readily available for use..
                    Eastern Washington State (GO COUGS)
                    Bayliner 2859 (North Idaho)
                    7.4 Closed Cool Bravo 2
                    Honda 15 with TR1 (best invention ever)
                    Hewescraft 21' Searunner (Crabbing, Watersports, Salmon, in that order)
                    Honda 130
                    Honda 9.9

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Risers and elbows are bolted on top of the manifolds and will retain raw water. The ball valve hoses should be double clamped. And the water in it will primarily be at the lake water temp.
                      1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

                      Mike

                      Comment


                        #13
                        ........................
                        Originally posted by Mike
                        Is the closed cooling half or full, engine only or includes exhaust manifolds?
                        The manifolds are cooled by antifreeze so I guess you would call it full closed cooling.
                        Yes, that would be correct.


                        If only half you should drain the manifolds. Either way the risers/elbows need to be drained.
                        I changed out the exhaust shutters (clackers) the first year on my boat while it was in the slip.
                        That would be the back-flow-prevention flappers.

                        I noticed while I had the couplers off that on my 2859 the lake static level rises and falls as the boat floats to within a couple inches of the top inside the Y-pipe. There's no way to drain that out below the waterline that I know of.
                        Correct!

                        I assume I'm relying on the temperature of the lake water to keep the Y pipe from freezing?
                        Correct!

                        I think it would take a prolonged and very cold episode to do that as my marina very seldom builds any ice.
                        That would be in your favor..... fingers crosses!

                        The heat exchanger, oil cooler, power steering cooler should all be drained.
                        I only have the main heat exchanger mounted up top/front of the engine,
                        The heat exchanger should have a "pencil" anode that can be removed. If so, that open port will drain the Raw Water side of the tube bundle.

                        and my combination oil cooler/steering cooler down low on the starboard side of the engine. Thus why I pull the raw intake hose which allows the pump and starboard side of the cooling system to drain of raw water. Then I pull the front end cap on the oil cooler which allows the cooler, and the port side of the cooling system to drain of raw water. This method appears to me to drain everything of raw water


                        as the hoses from the exhaust risers angle down and forward to the heat exchanger which then flows down to both positions that I am draining.

                        You must be referring to the raw water hoses that feed the Elbows with "spent" seawater that comes from the H/E.

                        The exhaust risers might have just a little bit of raw water that hasn't flowed over the "edge" and back into the Y Pipe or forward and down the raw hoses.
                        OK..... I think that we could use a bit of clarity here!
                        You will have exhaust manifolds, spacers/risers (if so equipped) and exhaust Elbows.

                        In spite of what we see and read, a Riser/Spacer is not an Elbow.... and visa-versa!

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	Exhaust riser spacer vs elbow explained.jpg Views:	1 Size:	44.4 KB ID:	468455






                        Seawater (river, lake or ocean) should not be approaching the Elbow's exhaust chamber "bend" or "turn-down" area.
                        If your exhaust system does not already have spacers/risers (between manifolds and elbows), perhaps you should install a pair. Or.... if you do have spacers/risers under your elbows, you could install a taller set of them.
                        That would raise the elbow's "bend" or "turn-down" area further above the water line.
                        In other words, it would effectively raise the point at which water (within the Y-pipe) could enter the main exhaust chamber.





                        The only thing I know I'm not draining is the crossover hose from the raw water pump to the oil cooler because it's a PITA to get the rear hose on and off of the oil cooler but since it's in the very bottom of the bilge seems to never be frozen (I always give it a squeeze before firing up.)
                        I'm not sure what to suggest on that one!
                        I can safely say that you would not want that cooler to freeze crack, then thaw out, and allow seawater to leak into the engine bay.


                        Instead of pulling the raw water input hose plumb it with a ball valve just make sure it sized properly.
                        So how do I do this without having the potential for raw water freezing on the back side of the ball valve and pushing the hose off just as what happened previously to the raw pump? The intake hose will be full all the way to the valve as it is below the waterline.
                        I understand your concern.
                        I guess that you'd weigh the difference between undergoing a cracked oil cooling housing -vs- undergoing a hose becoming separated from the ball valve inlet fitting.

                        Freshwater and head also also need to be addressed.
                        Yep, that gets RV antifreeze every fall.

                        Thanks folks for the suggestions. I'm just trying to figure a better way to do this and what would be most proper for a freshwater year round boat in a location with the potential for extended below freezing temps during the time I want it to be readily available for use..
                        By chance do you own a trailer for this boat?
                        If you could pull the boat, it would benefit you in several ways:
                        .... it would ensure that all seawater can be drained.

                        .... you will be able to inspect the drive.
                        .... it would prevent unforeseen stern drive corrosion from continuing.
                        .... it may allow for a better night's sleep!

                        Just a thought!

                        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                        Comment


                          #14
                          A valve with the ability to shut off the raw water supply from the outdrive and also introduce an antifreeze mixture would need to be installed on the incoming raw water supply hose as close as possible to the transom so that everything "downstream" of that valve theoretically could be protected from freezing. It's fairly tight in that area so some creative plumbing would likely be neccasary.
                          Dave
                          Edmonds, WA
                          "THE FIX"
                          '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                          (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                          The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                          Misc. projects thread
                          https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Sorry to beat this dead horse but my interest level has risen if this hasn't really been discussed before. Especially with the number of these boats in the northern climes.....

                            Rick,

                            To clarify, my 7.4 does have risers on top of the manifolds leading to elbows to the YPipe where the exhaust shutters are located and yes the risers are plumbed and are dumping the raw water overboard. The static water line in the Y pipe which I mentioned before is always slightly below the shutters and so probably at least 10 inches below the bottom turn of the elbows. So I doubt that at any time in the slip that I'll have lake water entering above the elbow and hopefully never as that is what the shutters are supposed to prevent...... on some rough downwind days on the lake when the entire trolling motor sometimes half submerges I understand why they have shutters in the YPipe!!! And based upon the location of the raw water supply hose inlet on the riser, I feel that I am getting something like 90% of the raw water out of the riser when I have the system open below.

                            In regards to the crossover hose (raw water pump to oil cooler----this is the lowest point in my raw water circuit and is the only part I cannot drain easily), it enters the aft side of the oil cooler. When I leave the boat, I am pulling the front cap on the oil cooler and the cooler drains completely as I have it slightly angled forward. The raw water then flows up from the oil cooler to the heat exchanger so I am also draining the heat exchanger when I pull the cover on the oil cooler (I HOPE). So now as I'm rereading this....maybe just a tee in this hose with a ball valve would be my single point raw water drain for the entire system?

                            Dave,

                            I agree with you that I would like to have a very simple quarter turn valve to eliminate the possibility of raw water entering the boat (for any reason) while it is in the slip. But when you mix in the possibility of freezing......after having seen what can happen if a hose pushes off or splits or whatever, I'm at a loss as to how to prevent that. I can't put antifreeze on the lake side of the ball valve because it would just enter the lake eventually. It almost seems like there should be an electric check valve that would open with the key in run position that would eliminate the possibility of any backflow into the bilge.

                            Again thank you all for your input.

                            Eastern Washington State (GO COUGS)
                            Bayliner 2859 (North Idaho)
                            7.4 Closed Cool Bravo 2
                            Honda 15 with TR1 (best invention ever)
                            Hewescraft 21' Searunner (Crabbing, Watersports, Salmon, in that order)
                            Honda 130
                            Honda 9.9

                            Comment

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