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    Re gel coating every ten years?

    My dock neighbor said he thought I needed to have my boat repainted due to some chalking. He said they need to be done every ten years. Is this true and if so any idea what the going rate is for a 490? I have noticed that it never looks as shiny as the newer boats no matter how much buffing is done. Thanks in advance.

    #2
    He must own a gel coating company. The condition of the surface is, just like the paint on a car, dependent on the maintenance. The good news is that the gel coat on the Motoryacht series is relatively thick and responsive. The bad news is to have a pro do it is a couple of boat bucks. I got a quote yesterday from a well known craftsman for my 3818. He explained that the first thing he would have to do is spot clean the rust and streaks caused by the industry around the marina. That would be $200. Then he would buff and wax everything except the inside of the flybridge but including the radar arch and cockpit. That part is $1400, and assuming to do it in March.
    About the only time new gel coat has to be laid down is for a major repair or to change the color or if it has been rubbed through by getting over enthusiastic with the cleaning compound. IMO, he’s the kind of know it all that is nice to avoid, but I’d probably just tell him what he’s full of.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

    Comment


      #3
      I have a boat 40 years old and one 30 years old. Both original gelcoat. Both are shinny still when polished.
      1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
      twin 454's
      MV Mar-Y-Sol
      1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
      Twin chevy 350's inboard
      Ben- Jamin
      spokane Washington

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Pcpete View Post
        He must own a gel coating company.
        IMO, he’s the kind of know it all that is nice to avoid, but I’d probably just tell him what he’s full of.
        Agree w Pete.

        Dave
        Edmonds, WA
        "THE FIX"
        '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
        (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
        The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
        Misc. projects thread
        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by yachtman View Post
          I have a boat 40 years old and one 30 years old. Both original gelcoat. Both are shinny still when polished.
          That’s good to hear! Ok, I’ll try a little harder on the buffing!

          Comment


            #6
            If you are going to do it yourself, attendance at YouTube University is highly recommended. See if there’s a craftsman around you willing to share the types of tools and chemicals he or she uses. I’ve used a 7” polisher from Harbor Freight for over ten years with a 7” hook and loop pad and using a cleaning tool on the pad often to keep the knap from getting overloaded. I also used a 3” three polisher kit and product from 3M on my varnish to polish it that fit onto the polisher. Today I bought a 6” dual action polisher at HF to attach a stiff brush to for cleaning the nonskid with soap, then I’m going to see how it works at polishing the gel coat. Something about getting older and controlling the 7”.
            P/C Pete
            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
            1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
            MMSI 367770440
            1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
            Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

            Comment


            • jmcajmca
              jmcajmca commented
              Editing a comment
              For the nonskid I used a floor cleaning machine with stiff brushes. It worked well.

              Joe

            #7
            There is a LOT of white gelcoat on our 47. When we first got it the gelcoat was heavily oxidized. I hired pros to compound, buff and wax it for $1800. Turned out pretty good. For the next go around I did some research. I bought the same Makita buffer the pros used. Bought Presta Ultra Cutting Cream, 3M polish, 3m compounding and polishing pads, Collinite paste wax and a bag of microfiber towels from Costco. It took me the better part of a week of hard work. Turned out pretty good. This past summer, using the same stuff but now being a little more skilled, it took about the same time but is now starting to look very good. The toughest part for me is doing the front part of the hull. I hired a pro to do the front third of the hull for $300. Some tips: a decent pair of knee pads is essential. Start with a clean hull with the old wax removed. I start at the very top of our hardtop and work down. I wash the whole boat once then wash the part I am working on just before buffing and waxing. This is primarily because of the Bay Area pollution. Apply and shine the paste wax by hand and do it two times per season.this is what protects the gel coat from oxidizing and makes cleaning and keeping it clean much easier. Use a mild boat soap. Harsh soaps eat wax!

            I just started using Woody Wax for the non skid. Very happy with that so far! I had terrible luck with the non skid cleaner and wax from West Marine. Maybe I used it wrong. It turned my non skid splotchy yellow! After that fiasco, the process I used was gently and carefully scrubbing On/Off hull cleaner onto the non skid. Read and follow directions! Rubber boots, gloves and some eye protection is recommended. This stuff has some important limitations! I used Bar Keepers Friend in areas that were not appropriate for the On/Off. It’s got some grit in it so think about what you are using it on. This process leaves the deck white and stain free. Then apply the Woody Wax following their directions. I did the non skid after I had buffed and waxed the whole boat. Whoops! The cleaning process stripped some of the wax that I had applied to the gel coat so I had to go back and rewax parts of the boat. I will do the non skid first, the next time. Duh! The Woody Wax is easy to use so I foresee using it pretty much every time I wash the boat. It seems to interface well with the paste wax on smooth gel coat so maybe it helps protect that surface as well. I now have three soft deck brushes. One for general washing, one for On/Off and one for Woody Wax. I hope by maintaining the surfaces, I do not have to use the On/Off brush very often.

            Its kind of funny, I did a lot of this in the fall and the boat looked great as I was buttoning it up for winter. Maybe I’ll try it in the spring so it looks that way all the next boating season next year!
            2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
            12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
            MV Kia Orana
            Currently Alameda CA

            Comment


              #8
              Wood,

              Which Woody Wax product are you reffering to? BTW, excellent info!

              Comment


                #9
                The only reason to re-gel coat a boat is if the gel coat is worn off.
                If you see fiberglass then re-gel coat.
                Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                Twin 350 GM power
                Located in Seward, AK
                Retired marine surveyor

                Comment


                  #10
                  Even if the gel coat were so worn and damaged that you wished to do something, re-gelcoating is not the answer.in my opinion. Painting with 2 part urethane (Awlgrip, Imron, or similar) is so much more durable and holds its gloss so much longer that it is a far better answer.
                  2005 Classic 242
                  5.7L Bravo 2
                  Portland, OR

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by Dooglas View Post
                    Even if the gel coat were so worn and damaged that you wished to do something, re-gelcoating is not the answer.in my opinion. Painting with 2 part urethane (Awlgrip, Imron, or similar) is so much more durable and holds its gloss so much longer that it is a far better answer.
                    Awlgrip and sterling paints are guaranteed for 20 years. Just wash and use no wax no polishing. Probably get more years than that if it's well taken care of but it's expensive and labor intensive.
                    1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
                    twin 454's
                    MV Mar-Y-Sol
                    1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
                    Twin chevy 350's inboard
                    Ben- Jamin
                    spokane Washington

                    Comment


                      #12
                      If you get a deep scratch can you patch and re-apply paint and match it like gelcoat?
                      It takes a professional to properly apply those linier paints.
                      Most large yachts have painted hulls, roll and tip with a very expensive brush, it can be sprayed, I would not do it.
                      If you need to re-gel coat every 10 years you are buffing it all off, why?
                      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                      Twin 350 GM power
                      Located in Seward, AK
                      Retired marine surveyor

                      Comment


                      • knuckledragger
                        knuckledragger commented
                        Editing a comment
                        No not buffing it all off. In just looks chalky and even the one time I had it buffed it really never got very shinny. Definately looks nothing like a newer boat looks.

                      #13
                      Originally posted by boatworkfl View Post
                      If you get a deep scratch can you patch and re-apply paint and match it like gelcoat?
                      It takes a professional to properly apply those linear paints.
                      Actually you usually get a better match with linear polyurethane because it does not fade as does gelcoat. Sure, it takes some skill to do a good looking repair, but that is also true of gelcoat.

                      2005 Classic 242
                      5.7L Bravo 2
                      Portland, OR

                      Comment


                        #14
                        I read an article a few years ago and watched a video od a large yacht hat had a scrape from another boat, it was patched and the whole boat was re-painted as the color was blue, I guess it would have been hard to match.

                        http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...gseXsB4WtwfL1c
                        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                        Twin 350 GM power
                        Located in Seward, AK
                        Retired marine surveyor

                        Comment


                          #15
                          I recently had mine done. It was in pretty bad shape after having sat for better than 10 years on stands up at Dagmars. After removing all the original pin striping you can feel a height difference between the gel coat that was exposed versus what was covered by the pin striping. They guys weren't able to buff it all out and ended up having to wet sand most of boat above the rub rail. You call still feel the thickness change but all in all the surface buffed out really well. It's not quite as shiny as what was under the pin stripes and there is some slight color difference but they guys who did the work tell me that the sun will even out the color difference in a season or two and with two or three sessions with a buffer the shine will improve and even out between the exposed and unexposed areas. Time will tell and it wasn't cheap. I let the young guys do the heavy lifting and bring the gel coat back to life (it took 2 guys a full week) and I'll do the maintenance myself going forward.

                          Paul
                          US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

                          1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
                          MMSI: 338181912

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