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    Adding an electrical outlet to the cockpit

    I'd like to add an electrical outlet to the cockpit of my 1999 3055. Has anyone done this? Where did you get the stuff to add it? I assume I can't just run to Lowes and get a box, wire and outlet to install.
    1999 Bayliner 3055

    #2
    What are you planning on plugging in?
    Simo
    2002 2855 350MPI Bravo III on Lake Champlain

    Comment


      #3
      Yes go get an "old work" single or double gang blue box, whatever outlets you want to put in it and some 14 gauge romex.

      Old work boxes allow you to cut a whole wherever you want and it has tabs that clamp down to hold box in place from behind.
      1993 formula pc 31 twin 454 bravo 2
      1989 2655 cierra 5.7 omc cobra
      2014 "searay" tandom trailer

      Anchor bay clinton river
      Michigan

      Comment


        #4
        Do you have an inverter and/or generator? How do you intend to use the outlet? Please be extra, extra careful and keep in mind that an open cockpit is likely to get wet at times and water seeping into the outlet may become a serious hazard.
        Retired, computer expert / executive
        Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
        Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
        D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
        bdervisoglu8@gmail.com
        bulent@pacbell.net

        Comment


          #5
          Several times I've wanted to plug in something as simple as vacuum, but recently, as stupid as this may seem, I thought it would be nice to have a George Foreman grill that I could just plug in when I wanted it, and store when I didn't. I'd also love to add a TV in that area. The plug would have to be strategically placed, but it would be nice. Just good old fashioned Romex? I have to believe that there are differences in the "marine-grade" stuff. I just don't know what it is and if it's needed.
          1999 Bayliner 3055

          Comment


            #6
            No, absolutely not romex! Tinned marine grade 14-2 plus ground. Solid wire can’t stand the vibration and sudden movement or stopping of a vehicle. The old work box is spot on, use an industrial grade if not industrial grade gfci outlet and a gasketed, covering, cover plate. I had one in my previous boat and it’s on the todo list for this one.
            P/C Pete
            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
            1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
            MMSI 367770440
            1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
            Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

            Comment


              #7
              Multi-strand and tinned marine grade wire should be used. Solid conductor wire like Romex is fine for houses but the multi-strand wire is made for movement and flexibility. Marine grade wire is also tinned for better corrosion protection.
              1987 38XX
              Twin Hino 175's NA

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks, everyone. This helped a ton!
                1999 Bayliner 3055

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Tincupchalice View Post
                  Several times I've wanted to plug in something as simple as vacuum, but recently, as stupid as this may seem, I thought it would be nice to have a George Foreman grill that I could just plug in when I wanted it, and store when I didn't. I'd also love to add a TV in that area. The plug would have to be strategically placed, but it would be nice. Just good old fashioned Romex? I have to believe that there are differences in the "marine-grade" stuff. I just don't know what it is and if it's needed.
                  Hey Tincup . . . . yeah, you're right; don't use "good, old fashioned Romex" . . . use boating wire (made up of stranded, not solid, wires but it might still be made by Romex ) It should definitely be a GFCI outlet and (unless protected WELL by location - use an outdoor cover to help keep it dry) I would use a 20A receptacle (not the 15A) and a 12 gauge boat wire (make sure breaker is then a 20A breaker as well - never know what you might plug into it later on . . .). You can surface mount (although GFCI devices are pretty thick, so measure accurately) or use a Dremel to make a hole for the "old box" as mentioned above - they also go by the name of "old work" boxes (as in "NOT new construction) . . . . then make sure you wire properly - do not connect 120VAC ground wire to your boat ground.
                  1998 Avanti 3685 - "Dad's Dream" w 454 Mercs - just a rockin' an'a rollin'
                  Former - "Home Aweigh" 2003 - 2452 Bayliner Cierra Classic Hardtop Cruiser
                  WQQM835 MMSI: 338147209
                  James H. Stradling

                  Comment


                    #10
                    A few more tips:

                    Do not use the push-in terminals on the electrical outlet; use the screw terminals. After you strip the insulation from the stranded wire, twist the strands in a counterclockwise direction, wrap the twisted strands in a clockwise direction around the terminal screw, and tighten the screw. This will prevent them from unraveling when you twist them clockwise around the screw. You can also use ring terminals on the wires. Do not use wire nuts anywhere on the boat. They are not designed to resist vibration. Do not tin or solder the wire.
                    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                    Anacortes, WA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I added 3 extra outlets on my 2858, one of them being a GFCI. Then I split the circuits so I had the same number of outlets (4) on each GFCI, the original in the head, and the new one, in the galley. The other 2 new outlets are both outside, one in the cockpit, the other on the flybridge. I used 20 amp and 12-2/g marine (stranded) cable. I was going to buy it at West Marine, but found it at Lowe's for considerably less.
                      Jeff & Tara
                      (And Ginger too)
                      Lake Havasu City, AZ
                      sigpic
                      2000 Bayliner 2858
                      "GETAWAY"
                      MMSI: 338094599
                      In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I would use 12 GA marine tinned wire, such as ANCOR. Here is an example from ebay.
                        The example is a highgher priced version, there are other siters as well as local purchase for the length you need.

                        https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ancor-Marin...RWVjU9&vxp=mtr
                        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                        Twin 350 GM power
                        Located in Seward, AK
                        Retired marine surveyor

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I've found that bestboatwire.com tends to have the best prices on marine wire and wiring accessories.
                          1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                          2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                          Anacortes, WA

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