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    2855 performance

    Have a recently purchased 1997 2855 ciera. Does anyone know where I could find a fuel vs speed chart? Or do you know the most efficient cruising speed?
    Last edited by ksanders; 11-09-2017, 12:42 AM.
    1997 2855 7.4 carb "Teachers' Lounge VI"

    #2
    "dbarger412" post=828709 wrote:
    Have a recently purchased 1997 2855 ciera. Does anyone know where I could find a fuel vs speed chart? Or do you know the most efficient cruising speed?
    Loaded question, especially considering your lack of details. Where will you be boating? What size engine? What OD do you have? How much experience do you have using trim tabs? Unless you are always boating on a calm lake, (which brings up the point about you filling out your profile) it really isn't about an overall efficient cruising speed, as much as the economy you want for where you are boating. While there may be a mean - and I may be wrong - I'm not sure if anyone can accurately address your question without knowing more.

    But this reads like you are wanting the best fuel economy. To get that, I would install a fuel monitor so you can adjust your helming style to the conditions you are in. That will get you the best fuel economy.
    "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
    MMSI: 367637220
    HAM: KE7TTR
    TDI tech diver
    BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
    Kevin

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      #3
      I agree with the Captain, need more info on your setup. The first Navionics addition I added to our 2000 2855 was a Garmin GFS-10 Fuel Flow Sensor, and it has easily paid for itself a few times over. It's great to get instantaneous info on flow rate at a particular speed. I think I can give you some still-water flow rates- but in the San Juan Islands and Puget Sound where we boat, still water is rare. The tides can flow up to 8 kts in some of the narrower passes! That said, we also have the Mercruiser 7.4 MPI, and Bravo 3, which may (or may not) give a little better fuel mileage than a carbureted big block, In other words, your mileage may vary.

      At 1400 RPM, I see about 3.8 GPH and approximately 6 MPH GPS speed

      At 1600 RPM, I see about 4.5 GPH and approximately 7 to 7.5 MPH

      At 1800 RPM, about 5.0 GPH and 8.5 MPH

      At 2000 RPM, about 5.5 GPH and 9-10 MPH

      On a plane (which after throttling back and trimming for max speed at that RPM) with 3200 RPM I see about 15 GPH and we're doing about 26 MPH

      At WOT (about 4400 RPM) and best trim, a whopping 25-26 GPH and 40 MPH. I don't do that very often!

      We actually don't like to run on plane unless we really need to get somewhere fast, or we are in a narrow pass with opposing tide. It just doesn't pay to stick around in a place where it's like you're swimming up a river. Also, it's very unrelaxing at speed, as you really need to watch for debris, logs, and kelp. Much better to cruise and enjoy the view.

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        #4
        Bottom line go slow 6 knts or go fast on plane trimmed out and motor happy. Anything in between is a waste of time and fuel.. if you're worried about fuel consumption, sell the boat fuel will be the cheapest part of boating.
        John McLellan White Rock BC
        "Halifax Jack"
        1999 2855 383 stroker BII
        MMSI 316004337

        Comment


          #5
          Sorry about the lack of information. Thanks for your input. I have a 2855 Ciera with a 7.4 carb engine. I am on a lake most of the time. However, I do travel on rivers and in saltwater occasionally.
          1997 2855 7.4 carb "Teachers' Lounge VI"

          Comment


            #6
            hfxjack: While I understand your reason for sarcasm, it really doesn't apply. For planning purposes, I have two long stretches of water with no fuel docks (one is 176 miles and the other is right at 200 miles). I was asking for fuel consumption in order to have a rough idea of how many extra gallons I will need to carry for these two legs of my journey. While I will have to carry extra fuel, I doubt that I will have to sell the boat. Thanks for the recommendations.
            1997 2855 7.4 carb "Teachers' Lounge VI"

            Comment


              #7
              "dbarger412" post=828860 wrote:
              hfxjack: While I understand your reason for sarcasm, it really doesn't apply. For planning purposes, I have two long stretches of water with no fuel docks (one is 176 miles and the other is right at 200 miles). I was asking for fuel consumption in order to have a rough idea of how many extra gallons I will need to carry for these two legs of my journey. While I will have to carry extra fuel, I doubt that I will have to sell the boat. Thanks for the recommendations.
              Going long distances like that, having a minimum of ┬╝ tank extra is a very good idea. On the other hand, if you are going where other boats frequent, an MMSI connection could quickly garner assistance. DSC through your VHF is an amazing network that can assist boats from much longer distances through a relay of jumping your message from one boat to the next until help is on its way.
              "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
              MMSI: 367637220
              HAM: KE7TTR
              TDI tech diver
              BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
              Kevin

              Comment


                #8
                if you want 200 miles, you will need a full tank, + 5 (5) gallon jugs on the swim platform, at 1200-1400 rpm, 6 mph. you might not get into 2 of the gas cans. you with your boat should get 150 miles range at 6 mph, not at plane.. the weight on the stern of extra fuel does not affect economy at this speed.

                you don't say where those stretches are.. if open ocean, and you have seas wind and tide, forget the economy figures. Must be the PNW. I believe you have 100 + gallons to start. I just revised... plan on 6 (5) gallon jugs.. don't store in cockpit. maybe up on fore deck. it you need. 130 gallons to go 200 miles.

                if you are planning to refuel underway, you should be so equipped and practiced with some aux equipment ie snug fitting hose and funnel. it is another thing to try and fuel in seas where water could enter the low, gas fill on a 2855.. plan only to refuel by standing inside the cockpit,. perhaps a temporary modification would be considered to add temp fuel capacity so you don't have to be out there. http://www.discountmarinesupplies.co...oaAtmuEALw_wcB
                cglazier - "Fiftybucks"
                1995 2855 7.4 bravo II

                Comment


                  #9
                  I've done it at sea with 5 gallon jugs in another boat. This time I'm thinking of strapping on a fuel bladder probably up front or an aux fuel tank back aft. I have looked at the one that you recommend. I'm beginning to think that if I have two of those, I should be ok. FYI one of those stretches is in the gulf and the other on the Mississippi. I'm familiar with the river system, lakes, gulf, AICW, just not with this boat. This is my first Bayliner. Also, I will be new to the Great Lakes on this trip. I appreciate your information. Thanks again.
                  1997 2855 7.4 carb "Teachers' Lounge VI"

                  Comment


                  • Glasply1
                    Glasply1 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Sounds like you are talking about the stretch from Hoppies to Paducah (205 miles) on the Mississippi and perhaps Carabelle to Tarpon Springs across the Gulf. We have done both on our 288 with a 113 gallon tank and 5.7L engine. From Hoppies to Paducah we carried five, five gallon cans and used them all arriving at Paducah with about 3 gallons in the tank! Carabelle to Tarpon is not a big deal as you can stop in Steinhatchee or Suwanee River either of which are much less than 176 miles from Carabelle. Before we attempted either we very carefully benchmarked our fuel burn at various speeds. We figured we got nearly 3mpg at 1,700rpms and about 1.4mpg at 4,200rpms and planned our pace accordingly. Given the data, we COULD have gone from Hoppies to Paducah without carrying any extra fuel, but I had the cans and there's only so long I can putt along at 7mph so we calculated the distances we needed to go slow and on plane to arrive at Paducah as fast as we could given our fuel constraints (even so it was two days from Hoppies to Paducah because we had to go slow to conserve fuel). We simply dumped in our extra fuel while at anchor overnight off the Mississippi. You will have a big current push in your favor if going down the Mississippi before running against the current on the Ohio to get to Paducah. You must also factor in the issues of dinking around waiting to pass through three locks. You could be waiting days(!), but that doesn't burn much fuel.

                  #10
                  Best thing you can do, which was already suggested. Get a fuel flow sensor and real time read out. You will be amazed how you ever boated without one. Garmin makes one, $200 hooks up to nema and will integrate into your gps unit.

                  My sbc favored 3700 rpm much more than 3500. 1.2mpg vs 1.5mpg.

                  You can even see the cause and effect of how you trim the boat out. What props you run, how much weight, water wind conditions. Its the only way other than speculation
                  1993 formula pc 31 twin 454 bravo 2
                  1989 2655 cierra 5.7 omc cobra
                  2014 "searay" tandom trailer

                  Anchor bay clinton river
                  Michigan

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