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86 2450 Ciera design

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    86 2450 Ciera design

    Hi all,

    Hope someone can shed some light on the design of the 2450 Ciera. So I bought this boat 2 years back and long story which I hope to get in to at another time, but it needed work so I started taking her apart. So needed to replace back board under the step due to rot, got to where the toilet was placed and removed the top and found this



    now I have heard that the Bayliner was often called or refereed to the boat at the bottom of the water, could this be part of the reason? (lol) Also how the heck does one get this out without damaging the hull?

    If anyone has any suggestions, recommendations or any hints that would be great. Also is this needed and was it a factory install or is it just someones handy work after the fact. The fiberglass looks the same as the rest of the hull but who knows.
    Last edited by ksanders; 11-08-2017, 11:44 PM.

    #2
    Ballast. It's not unusual to find concrete in the hull of an old Bayliner.
    Mocoondo
    2002 Bayliner 195 Capri
    Mercruiser 5.0L V8 / Alpha I Gen II
    MMSI: 338091755

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      #3
      Yes Bayliner installed concrete for ballast in some models, the 2859 have it and there are several posts depicting removals.






      Attached files

      Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
      96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

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        #4
        Thanks for the info and suggestions all, so I found that there is ballast on both sides and now know how to remove it.

        There more on the port side that the starboard which does not make sense as the water tank is also on the port side and batteries on the starboard. So from my observation heavier on port side.

        But any how, does removing the ballast cause stability issues on the water? What have others experienced after taking out the ballast?

        Let me know your thoughts please if there have been any issues or concerns when doing this, or have you been supplementing the ballast for something else? Or am I just over thinking this?


        Attached files

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          #5
          The reality is that Bayliner configured a empty boat and the we load stuff we cant be without, so pull the concrete put the boat in the water and start moving till things are somewhat level it will never be perfect but you have removed weight, so the is overall gain.
          Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
          96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

          Comment


            #6
            "Scheepers" post=827623 wrote:
            now I have heard that the Bayliner was often called or refereed to the boat at the bottom of the water, could this be part of the reason?
            No matter what some ranters say about Bayliners, having concrete, lead or steel in the bottom of a hull isn't a bad thing. Sailboats have been doing it for years. Even the old square-rigged vessels had basketball sized boulders in the bottom of their hulls. Granted, they were displacement vessels, but the beauty of concrete is that it is an inexpensive dead weight. Stability has a place and a price. If you want it less stable, remove it. Otherwise, it has a place where it is.

            I rebuilt an old 33' Chris Craft with twin 327's in her. The first time I took it into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, I realized this was definitely a lake boat, even though it had been modified over the years with FWC and trim tabs. The bow was so light, every wave would lift half the boat. So, I added 380lbs of concrete and lead into the bottom of the bow, and WOW! what a difference! Not only was the side-to-side far less while fishing in the chop, the bow would plow through waves that would previously have knocked my teeth out.

            My point is, having concrete in a hull doesn't mean it is a cheap boat. In truth, adding it shows a decidedly conscious awareness of how the boat handles, along with the desire to improve its performance. Personally, since 100lbs of concrete has a far greater buoyancy in water than 100lbs of lead, I would have a much easier time raising a sunken boat if the ballast was concrete rather than lead or steel. For ballast in boats, concrete works great.

            IN ADDITION, the fact you have a flybridge may be what the ballast is for, because the moment you put weight up there, if it shifts to the side, you will want something very heavy in the bottom of the hull to counter the shift in balance.
            "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
            MMSI: 367637220
            HAM: KE7TTR
            TDI tech diver
            BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
            Kevin

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