Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 27 Jul 2017 18:48 #1

  • adam
  • adam's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • New Member
  • New Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Thank you received: 4
Hi
I recently noticed both plastic drain tubes in my splashwell are cracked and need to be replaced. Also, when I pulled them out, I was shocked to see unprotected wood that is wet.

Any idea what I should do? Is the transom ruined? Why the heck wouldn't they have sealed the wood off better before shoving those cheap tubes in there?

Also, there is a plastic piece right on top of the transom where the outboard mounts on. This plastic is popping up around the edge. Should I expect there is bare wood there too??

Anyone with an early 90s Capri or arriva whith an outboard who knows?

I will attach a picture later to describe better.

Also

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 18 Sep 2017 23:21 #2

  • adam
  • adam's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • New Member
  • New Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Thank you received: 4
I'm just following up on this as i realized I didn't post a picture. I found replacement splashwell tubes on Amazon and ended up using a ton of Boat Life Sealant during the install.

I took a fan and aimed it at the holes for about a week before doing the install, and everything seemed dry at that point. So hopefully I don't have any permanent transom damage. Very surprised to see the manufacturer had thru-transom holes with absolutely no caulk or protection for the wood at all!

Here's the replaced tube with a ton of sealant in there.

This message has an attachment image.
Please log in or register to see it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last Edit: by adam.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 19 Sep 2017 23:48 #3

  • Centerline2
  • Centerline2's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 140
  • Thank you received: 35
they never put sealant in there... neither do they seal the wood where they cut the hole to install the outdrive.
some very elite manufactures do, but no manufacture of mass produced boats feel its worth doing

their reasoning is that if they tried to seal it and water did get in, it would never have a chance to dry no matter how long the boat was laid up... the moisture would just set there and rot the transom quicker than if it were able to have a chance to dry.....
AND if it were sealed and designed to keep the water out, and water somehow got in there, depending on the age of the boat, the manufacture could be liable for a warranty claim... so it has been designed to remain as unsealed wood, and so it solves everyones problem...... until the transom gets old and rots away.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

1989 Bayliner 2556, 5.7 OMC Cobra
Last Edit: by Centerline2.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 20 Sep 2017 00:39 #4

  • adam
  • adam's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • New Member
  • New Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Thank you received: 4
that's interesting. I suppose it makes sense that they want it to be able to dry out if water does get in there. Well mine are sealed up now, so I hope I don't have any issues! I also noticed the area around the drain plug is also bare wood. It's a separate piece of wood not connected to the transom in my boat...but still was really surprised to see the wood just asking to suck up water....

I see you have a 1989 boat...and mine is one year newer. Do you have any issues with transom rot? Maybe you can see in my picture above, there are a couple of small hairline cracks in the gelcoat. I'm not sure what to look for to know if I have a serious problem or not. I had the boat dealer install a new floor over last winter and he said he inspected the transom before beginning to make sure it was solid and he said it was. And he said the stringers were in good shape. But I think he was probably jumping up and down on the outboard more than anything else to inspect for rot.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 22 Sep 2017 04:23 #5

  • Centerline2
  • Centerline2's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 140
  • Thank you received: 35

adam wrote: that's interesting. I suppose it makes sense that they want it to be able to dry out if water does get in there. Well mine are sealed up now, so I hope I don't have any issues! I also noticed the area around the drain plug is also bare wood. It's a separate piece of wood not connected to the transom in my boat...but still was really surprised to see the wood just asking to suck up water....

I see you have a 1989 boat...and mine is one year newer. Do you have any issues with transom rot? Maybe you can see in my picture above, there are a couple of small hairline cracks in the gelcoat. I'm not sure what to look for to know if I have a serious problem or not. I had the boat dealer install a new floor over last winter and he said he inspected the transom before beginning to make sure it was solid and he said it was. And he said the stringers were in good shape. But I think he was probably jumping up and down on the outboard more than anything else to inspect for rot.


while I had the engine out and waiting for parts, I removed the swim platform for some modifications, and at that time I resealed everything bolted to the transom. I also relocated some of the components in the engine bay for better access and filled some empty screw holes, and I have not seen any softness in the transom.... I checked the stringers and they are solid, but not dry, and as long as they support and hold the engine down, Its of little concern to me for the next several years.

the gelcoat cracks in these years of bayliners, sadly, is so common that its almost normal. depending on what factory they were built in, some have worse cracking/crazing than others. but its not common for a gelcoat crack to penetrate all the way thru the layup. there are times when the wood inside will get wet and swell, then crack the layup all the way thru... this is repairable but not a fun repair.

what a person needs to understand about boats, and especially older boats, is that the polyester resin from which they are built is not waterproof. moisture will eventually work its way thru into the dry wood inside. this takes years but moisture can be in the wood without any breach in the layup.

I been working with old boats all my life and found that all older boats have wet wood in the transom (exceptions are very rare) but its the boats without good ventilation that begin to have rot and mildew problems. this includes tarped over boats, boats that dont get used often, and boats that are generally neglected.... a boat that gets used all the time can have a wet transom and be without any softness for years and years, because of the ventilation that a used boat gets. usually it begins with mildew that strart to grow, and then the rot follows...
as hard as it is to dry out a piece of fiberglass encased wood, its my opinion that its better to wait til it begins to get softness in it before opening it up for the repair, as the opening up, drying and resealing process is as difficult as the replacement process.. AND after drying it, there is no guarantee that rot hasnt already started, or that the resealing will hold.
The following user(s) said Thank You: adam, n1st

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

1989 Bayliner 2556, 5.7 OMC Cobra
Last Edit: by Centerline2.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 22 Sep 2017 11:49 #6

  • n1st
  • n1st's Avatar
  • Offline
  • New Member
  • New Member
  • Posts: 4
  • Thank you received: 0
CenterLine,

Good information. I'm a newbie, and have been going back and forth in my mind between sealing things up tight vs. leaving access. I currently have some water in my transom from leaking splash drain tubes (like Adam) on my 1999 bayliner. I've got computer fans drying out the 1" x 3" holes now. How would you suggest bedding the drain tubes when I put the new ones in? Inside lip, out side lip, both lips, inside the full length of the hole too?

I've also got screw holes lower in the transom from where an old transducer cable used to be. What do you fill your screw holes with? I'm considering just covering them with TPU pool liner patches so I can open them up periodically and check for wetness.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cracked motor well (splashwell) tube 23 Sep 2017 19:45 #7

  • Centerline2
  • Centerline2's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 140
  • Thank you received: 35

n1st wrote: CenterLine,

Good information. I'm a newbie, and have been going back and forth in my mind between sealing things up tight vs. leaving access. I currently have some water in my transom from leaking splash drain tubes (like Adam) on my 1999 bayliner. I've got computer fans drying out the 1" x 3" holes now. How would you suggest bedding the drain tubes when I put the new ones in? Inside lip, out side lip, both lips, inside the full length of the hole too?

I've also got screw holes lower in the transom from where an old transducer cable used to be. What do you fill your screw holes with? I'm considering just covering them with TPU pool liner patches so I can open them up periodically and check for wetness.


bedding a drain tube is a personal preference, but silicone would be my first choice, only because a plastic drain tube is not forever and may need to be replaced again. silicone can be removed easier than any of the other adhesive marine sealers. if you are attempting to seal out the moisture, one should fill the cavity so that if the tube cracks, it wont allow the water to contact the wood.... if you only seal the lips, you are basically making a better seal to seal in any moisture that may find its way in due to a crack in the plastic or broken seal at the end of the tube. no sealer at all will give moisture a chance to escape when it gets warm enough.

filling screw hole are more important... EPOXY ONLY for this... what I do is use a countersink to taper the gelcoat away from the hole, then use thickened epoxy to make the fill.
sometimes after tapering the gelcoat, I will open the hole up with a bit and use a small resin syringe to inject the epoxy to the bottom of the hole... and ALWAYS after, i will use a small coin sized piece of plastic to top the epoxy with as this keeps the epoxy from sagging out...usually it doesnt need any tape over it, but some larger holes may hold enough resin that it sags anyway, so tape is necessary as additional support over the plastic.
just a piece of trash bag will work and it gives it a head start on the fairing process because the plastic peels away easily after the cure and leaves a smooth shiny surface. in addition to a roll of plastic, I have some super thin but rigid mylar sheeting that I use for all types of resin work. its almost always reusable, and the rigid mylar is good for taping over a fill in a deep scratch as it conforms to the existing hull shape, leaving a cured fill that takes very little to fair out...

a counter sink is a tool that is overlooked but it is a boat owners friend.... ANYTIME a hole is drilled in a plastic surface, which includes FRP, and especially where gelcoat is used, the drilled hole should be tapered a bit. this prevents the edges from being chipped and eroded away when installing hardware, or if the hole is to be left open, it makes a nice edge... and is already prepped for filling if one decides they put the hole in the wrong spot ;-)
The following user(s) said Thank You: adam, n1st

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

1989 Bayliner 2556, 5.7 OMC Cobra
Last Edit: by Centerline2.
  • Page:
  • 1
Moderators: Jim GandeeRuffryder
Time to create page: 0.092 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum