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TOPIC: Battery cable question

Battery cable question 28 Sep 2017 22:51 #26

  • boatworkfl
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"Marine Grade" is an ANCOR brand name, Marine approved such as required by ABYC has finer stranding than house hold or automotive wire, the finer stranding resists flex cracking better than larger diameter strands.
That being said a proper crimp and on battery cables there should be an adhesive heat shrink between the cable and lug, this will help prevent corrosion which may not be seen until too late.
I use only 2/0 battery cable for most runs depending on the distance and amps required. Over kill is better than under sizing.
Boats are expensive, proper wire and cables are cheap compared to the cost of a boat.

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Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
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Retired marine surveyor

Battery cable question 29 Sep 2017 20:48 #27

  • dmcb
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I agree with Mickey about welding cable. I think it is the best you can get.
Just think of its use. Always being moved. dragged over whatever is in the way. Much more abuse than you will ever see in a boat and most likely carrying more amps.
Perhaps its because I boat in fresh water but I keep my cables clean and have no problems;
As pointed out tinned cables can corrode also.
So what are you saying? Tinned cables will just go longer before you have a fire?
Personally in over 60 years of boating I have never seen, heard of, or read about a fire starting because the battery cable wasn't tinned.
Has anyone?
Or know of any boat that failed a survey because battery cables were not tinned?
Doug

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Started boating 1955
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Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner
Last Edit: by dmcb.

Battery cable question 29 Sep 2017 21:19 #28

  • cfoss1
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One more opinion:

Use welding cable. Do NOT use heat shrink of any kind....this can and will hide corrosion until it is too late. Do use a corrosion inhibitor like NO-OX-ID:

www.sanchem.com/docs/NO-OX-ID%20A-Specia...ectrical%20Grade.pdf

You can heat it with a heat gun and it will move up under the insulation due to capilliary action. Works great.

I solder my connections instead of crimping them. Crimps done right are fine though.

Chay

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Battery cable question 29 Sep 2017 22:17 #29

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cfoss1 wrote: One more opinion:

Use welding cable. Do NOT use heat shrink of any kind....this can and will hide corrosion until it is too late. Do use a corrosion inhibitor like NO-OX-ID:

www.sanchem.com/docs/NO-OX-ID%20A-Specia...ectrical%20Grade.pdf

You can heat it with a heat gun and it will move up under the insulation due to capilliary action. Works great.
I solder my connections instead of crimping them. Crimps done right are fine though

You are wrong, you mention heat shrink, the tone of this thread is adhesive heat shrink, I also think welding cable is OK only if used with adhesive heat shrink to seal out moisture, and not soldered-soldered is very old school work, not approved for marine duty.
That being said, when you go to sell your boat the surveyor may mention the battery cable type, that will influence the sale.
I buy all my battery cable on ebay, I find great deal on Ancor wire all the time, why not use it.
Having been to the Chapman marine surveying school in FL I learned a-lot about marine wire.
Use what you want, it is your boat, be care full about insurance if it becomes an issue.
If my 3870 were to sink or partially sink, it would be totaled like most would, but most of the wire would be useable as it is sealed.
When the solder moves up under the insulation you create a solid wire next to a flexible wire, thus a break point from flex.

.

Chay

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Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

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Battery cable question 30 Sep 2017 00:25 #30

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Norton Rider wrote:

Mr. Darcy wrote: All it takes is for some surveyor to point out "non-marine" wire and then you have a brand new 'can of worms'.


In many years of boating I have never heard of a surveyor pointing out non-marine wire. Surveyors are not usually concerned about whether the wire is marine wire or not. They are concerned about household Romex-type wire used in boat AC systems. When smaller boats first started having shore power a lot of the boats were wired with Romex-type wire. Many insurance companies will not insure a boat with this type of wire aboard.


Your wrong about the use of automotive wire on a boat, a a marine surveyor should report this to a buyers marine surveyor report, I certainly would.
Exception is: A boat built prior to ABYC standards, but it would be mentioned/noted, and recommendations would/should be stated.

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Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
Twin 350 GM power
Located in Seward, AK
Retired marine surveyor
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