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TOPIC: 38XX Following Seas

38XX Following Seas 16 Sep 2007 00:00 #1

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I currently own a 32' Uniflite Sports Sedan and am looking to move up to a Bayliner 38XX. My current boat does not handle well in following or quartering seas - how does the Bayliner take to following seas?? I put the trim tabs full bow up and the boat still tends to snap roll when heading down swell - pretty hairy at times. Thanks.:(

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38XX Following Seas 16 Sep 2007 02:29 #2

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mcpo;68976 wrote: I currently own a 32' Uniflite Sports Sedan and am looking to move up to a Bayliner 38XX. My current boat does not handle well in following or quartering seas - how does the Bayliner take to following seas?? I put the trim tabs full bow up and the boat still tends to snap roll when heading down swell - pretty hairy at times. Thanks.:(


The 38xx is pretty typical. It doesn't love following seas but it's OK as long as you don't trim the bow down.

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38XX Following Seas 16 Sep 2007 13:44 #3

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I have a 47' sun bridge cruiser with a deep trawler style keel and it does not like following or stern quarter seas. I have broached my boat 4 times and I never want to see the 5th. Knowing what I know now, in light conditions, I would drop the trim tab a little on the corner that was being pushed. In more extreme conditions I would drag a 300 ft anchor rope off the pushed corner. If that failed to provide the correction I was looking for, I would not hesitate to drag my sea anchor. Short version, I think all boats are going to try to swing in following seas. The bigger the boat, the less the tendancy but the bigger the seas, the bigger the swing. You can compensate with steering or throttles or in more extreme conditions, by dragging things. But IMO, all boats will move when the stern it pushed.

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38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 01:00 #4

  • HughfromOz
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I agree with Mike, I've had my 38xx in some pretty big seas and the bigger and steeper the sea, the more the boat wants to broach but I don't think it is worse than any other boat and on a normal rolling sea 3 to 6 feet it handles them quite well again providing the trim tabs are up. Like any boat you have to stear it down the waves and I often do this to take advantage of the extra speed, like riding a surfboard. The auto pilot doesn't like it as it is too slow to react.

Hugh

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38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 06:38 #5

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Following seas have never worried me in my 38. I do think that it rolls more than a hard chine boat when the seas are on the fwd qtr and side. It is an uncomfortable roll.

I have been out in some very big seas in the 38 and never had an issue though. I have even taken green water over the side one day with an unexpected wave.

I have never been afraid on the boat and I carry a crew of 3 ranging in age from 2-7 excluding the Admiral who's age cannot be disclosed. The boys sleep through the rough stuff and my daughter gets a tad nervous.

What you lose in comfort with the roll you gain in economy so it is a balancing act.

Wayne

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38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 11:41 #6

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I think the design of todays boats have a lot to do with handling a following sea.
If you want very good handling, look for an old double ender.
A boat that tapers back at the stern like a sailboat.
I had a 46' Chris Craft that was at its best in a following sea. I was in some bad seas in the 20 or so years I had her and never had a problem with following seas.
The boat was 12' wide but tapered to 9' at the stern.
I believe that was a big factor in its handling in a following sea.
Boats now are wide stern designs and I believe this contributes to what you are talking about.
I know other things contribute also.
Doug

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Started boating 1955
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3870 presently owned
Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 14:25 #7

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My friends and I took my 3870 out on the Chesapeake Bay during a small boat advisory and gale warnings, an event that I doubt very seriously I will attempt again. We buried the prow about every 6-7 minutes or so, rocked and rolled. Smashed a lot of stuff down below, at one time I was standing in the rear cockpit looking up at waves, saying "what in hell are we doing here? Anyway, to answer your question, the 38 did okay, would not want to push it again though.

P.S. I got sick as a dog when I left the con to go below to the head. Never again.

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38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 18:24 #8

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A few years ago we were searching for and researching a 32' Uniflite. By chance I spoke with Vic of Padden Creek - the former Uniflite plant, and learned some interesting stories. Many of the 32' Uniflites have a "live well" built into the swim step. This is really not for fishing. It was added on to give the stern some extra weight (water) to improve the following sea handling. The big square stern on most of these style boats gives the owner the living space they want, but as pointed out, this extra floatation just allows the stern to try to pass the bow on the following seas.

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38XX Following Seas 17 Sep 2007 18:59 #9

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Thanks one and all for the info provided - anything has to be better than my Uniflite - it has a bad rep for following seas - larger rudders and more weight in the stern have been suggested by other Uni owners - I still will be looking for a 38 Bayliner - thanks again....

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38XX Following Seas 03 Oct 2007 05:56 #10

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I have a 4788 and live in the San Fransisco area. I agree with most of the above comments. The ocean here is mostly rough year round fortunatly the Bayliners have fairly low centers of gravity. I have never heard of any local boats rolling from a broach. I can usually run on auto pilot, however I increased rudder speed settings which increased helm response time.
One of the nice things about having enough power to run at or about the speed of the following waves is it mitagates most of the boats tedency to broach. Unfortunatly this isn't always cheap usually about 14kts. A friend of mine has a Grand Banks 52, it tends to broach so badly he has to hand steer it in a following sea. Surfing these slow respondng boats is not a good idea. If possible stay on the back side of the waves. Has anybody heard of anyone using a articulated rudder on a 4788? Some of the crab boats use these rudders to increase control at slow speed. Passage Maker Magazine had a article on a rudder that was hinged on the trailing edge to increase rudder angle similar to a cupped propeller. I'm not sure if this would enhance rudder control at planning speed or not. My concern with increasing rudder size would be reinforcing the hull and rudder post as well as possibly the steering components. Any Ideas!

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38XX Following Seas 03 Oct 2007 12:20 #11

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You may be on to something with the increased rudder size.
I just remembered (the Chris again) I increased the rudder size to help the auto pilot keep control.
It was the difference between night and day after I did that.
I could run auto pilot in any seas with that boat but not before the rudder increase.
My increase was rather crude perhaps. I worked at GM and I had the tool room do a government job for me. Ya know, for the people.
Using a piece of some kind of metal they had but better than stainless, they simply bent it to go over about 1/2 of the existing rudder. (over both sides) and extended back maybe 3 inches. Can't remember.
I simply bolted it on.
Had that boat over 20 years and never a problem with that.
So it would be quite simple to try it on any of your boats.
If you didn't like it, remove it and deal with the bolt holes.
Doug

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Started boating 1955
Number of boats owned 32
Bayliners
2655
2755
2850
3870 presently owned
Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner
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