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TOPIC: 3288 constant rotation while anchered

3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 03:51 #1

  • emtprescue
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We have just returned from our first long trip which was a week at Desolation Sound. While on the hook, our boat would rotate almost constantly, sometimes a full 360 degrees.
Most others in the same ancherage would not be moving at all.
We tried to stick to the 5:1 chain out to depth ratio.
What am I doing wrong?
There has to be some trick to fixing this problem.

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 04:16 #2

  • myflies
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We always stern anchored with the stern of the boat pointed toward shore or stern tied to shore. The boat only swings with the amount of slack in the line. You will want to make sure you have enough slack in the stern tie line so you're not completely tight against the stern tie and anchor line at the extreme ends of the high & low tides.

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 05:08 #3

  • Shar-n-dan
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We were anchored in a small anchorage a few weeks ago and there was a
38 footer anchored a hundred yards or so from us. For a few hours the wind
blew around 25 to 30 knots. We in our 32xx played crack the whip and all the
while the 38 just pointed into the wind. Ithought the reason we tracked back
and forth while he didn't was because the 38 had a enclosed bridge and covered back deck with side curtains but maybe not. We have 80' of chain
before 3/4" nylon and he had all chain, but I believe it has to do with aero-dynamics more than any thing else because anchored in a running tide we stay pretty straight on.
It's just annoying with no wave action but we got stuck for the night at anchor in about 3' waves and tracted back and forth almost all night. I was ready to give it back to the Indians by daylight.
Dan

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 06:15 #4

  • SteveE
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I agree with Dan, I think it's mostly an aerodynamic issue. We had a 28' Bayliner Contessa years ago and when the wind picked up we also played crack the whip. I think we had about 50' of chain and the rest was nylon anchor rode. Our Bayliner 3888 seemed to do better when the wind picked up, but unfamiliar guests would always comment about how much it moved around. Now we have a 4550 and it too whips around sometimes when it's breezy.

But, I see most of the other boats behaving like our boats have. I don't really recall just our boat moving about while the others sat like rocks.

Certainly having a stern tie solves this problem but that isn't always practical, and can really make life miserable if the incoming waves happen to be broadside to the way you stern tied the boat. Talk about rock and roll with these round chined boats!

I guess you could make sure your rudder is dead center and that the trim tabs are up in case there's some wierd interaction between your boat and the current, but I think it's unlikely.

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SteveE
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1986 4550 "Synergy"
La Conner, WA

3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 12:13 #5

  • The Other Gary
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Take a spare line and some slack in the rode and tie the rode off center to a bow cleat. This will cut the whipcracking by half.

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"Adios Dinero"
1997 3988 with new 330 Cummins
Photo Credit: Whiskywizard

3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 12:19 #6

  • Patriot_3270
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I agree, the wind and aerodynamic stability of the boat will have a lot to do with it. However, I have also found that the sea floor also has a major play in your stability. As the tide or current, depending on your location, moves; it will swirl around outcrops, bars and depressions to create an unstable location for a given area. One of my favorite places to go is a very small protected cove, but during mid tide the boat swing like a Las Vegas dance floor. At peak tide it is stable. Yet, if I move to the other side of the river the boat remains very stable in all tide conditions.

Regardless, it can be nerve racking at night wondering it your anchor is going to break out of the clay because you swung 180 degrees and you will awake to the sound of a crunch crunch crunch against the rocks. Danforth recommends two anchors in opposite directions just for this reason. Or tying off the stern to the shore will have the same effect.

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Erik
PATRIOT 1986 - 3270
Chesapeake Bay – Western Shore

3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 14:42 #7

  • mmichellich
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Our 47 seems to do the same thing in certain anchorages. Doesn't seem to make a difference how much scope is out, how high the wind as long as it is over a certain threshold. If you want to make it worse, put your dingy in water and tie it parallel to the swim step. I have concluded it is a combination of aerodynamics on our superstructure and current on our semidisplacement hull. Certain conditions will make it pretty bad. If I go out in my dingy and look at other boats up close, they do much the same but not as much. I have noted it is sometimes possible to slow the movement by moving the rudders to one direction or the other.

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Started boating 1965
Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 17:14 #8

  • SteveE
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I have been using a homemade anchor bridle for a few years now. It's simple and cheap. Take some heavy line and run it from one front cleat down to a chain hook that you attach to the anchor chain near the water line, then a matching line from the chain hook back up to the cleat on the other side of the boat.

With this you take the load off the pulpit and windlass, it gets the pull of the boat closer to the water, and maybe provides a little more stabilization since the pull from the anchor chain is distributed to each side of the boat rather than at the very center of the boat.

I wish I had a better picture for you.

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Something like this might help, and it certainly is a safer way to anchor.

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SteveE
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1986 4550 "Synergy"
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3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 17:46 #9

  • whiskywizard
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Sailboats sit still at anchor becasue their superstructures are cleaner and those big keels really stabilize the vessel. Our 3888 hunts at anchor a lot too. Mostly, you learn to live with it; there is no complete solution.

The bridle suggestion (SteveE) does help some. Another minor help is to tether your dinghy behind you by about 20-25'. Are you interested in a mast and steadying sail?

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Whiskywizard
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3288 constant rotation while anchered 28 Aug 2007 20:25 #10

  • JWood
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I anchor our 2655 on inland lakes and have the most trouble when the wind is light. Wind dies off, anchor rode pulls boat forward, wind comes up and blows the bow around until the anchor rode goes tight and we swap ends. Tying a line to the rode and cleating it to the mid cleat so the boat does not point directly into the wind helps but I keep a small anchor to throw off the stern if the wind is light. It keeps the slack out of the anchor rode and will drag if the wind changes directions.

JWood

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 01:27 #11

  • chuck4788
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It is all about the aerodynamics. All of my Bayliners were swingers, the bridle shown in a previous post helps. But what really works the best is to tie the anchor rode to a side cleat, or add a sail to the stern.

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 01:47 #12

  • Peter W
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For new comer, this has been an interesting thread. Chuck, when you recommend a side cleat, I assume you mean a forward one, or do you mean one more midships? I also assume that you consider the cleat strong enough, and/or you additionally have the anchor rode secure at the windlass, in case the cleat gives way. I have also read else where, that a bridle assists by taking strain off the windlass, as well as will quieten the likely noises that movement can transmitt throgh the vessel, so attaching to a cleat via a line or snubber will over come the possible noise problem.
cheers

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Peter W
"Sajesar" MY 3988
RQYS - Marina, Manly
Brisbane, Australia

3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 03:03 #13

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The bridle definitely quiets the noise transmitted by an all-chain rode. That's the primary reason I started using a bridle. I've been in too many rocky anchorages where you get the shock of a lifetime in the middle of the night when the chain skips over a rock and sends a huge boom into the boat. I got tired of waking up startled wondering if we had slipped anchor and hit the shore. With the bridle you still hear the noise but it's not a heart stopper in the middle of the night.

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SteveE
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3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 03:44 #14

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I find it helps to use a line rode off the forward side cleat. It tends to make the boat only track to one side. I pull it tight and then back off the windlass to take the strain off it. It also makes for a quieter ride. With an "S" hook clamped on the end of the rode eye I hook it into the chain. this makes for a quick unleash, in the event a mid-night quick response is reguired.

Pugetsoundog (woof)

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 03:55 #15

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I have the same problem with my 4588, it is for sure aerodynamics affecting the upward tulip shaped bow and the boat vertually tacks on the anchor line. Apparently many Bayliners have the same "at anchor" attitude (volage), even the smaller Trophy models. In strong winds it can become quite anoying and a real hassle by giving all the anchor gear a hard time.
I use 8 RockerStoppers (as seen in a previous thread) to slow down a bit the boat's mouvements from side to side or back & forward. They act as drift anchors as well as stabilizers. Have noticed some improvments but could be better using 16 RockerS (recommended for 45'+ boats) instead of only 8.

JP

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3288 constant rotation while anchered 29 Aug 2007 06:02 #16

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newcal;63274 wrote: I use 8 RockerStoppers (as seen in a previous thread) to slow down a bit the boat's mouvements from side to side or back & forward. They act as drift anchors as well as stabilizers. Have noticed some improvments but could be better using 16 RockerS (recommended for 45'+ boats) instead of only 8.

JP


I have 16 rocker stoppers on my 45 and they do help, at least in the side-to-side motion. But, with each side only being 6'-7' off the centerline of the boat the effect isn't what it could be if you could get them further out from the boat. That said though, I think it was a worthwhile purchase. I've seen them on eBay cheap, for those interested!

I haven't deployed them during the anchor wandering that we are talking about here though. One time in an anchorage with a huge current I had to pull them back in because with the flow going by the boat the line was rubbing all the bottom paint off the hull....

I spent 6 days on a Nordhavn 40 a few years ago and it had the optional 'anchor only Paravanes' that were designed just for use at anchor. It had Wesmar active stabilizers for use while underway (AWESOME, by the way). It appeared to be a really slick setup, although we never stopped moving for the 6 days so I didn't get to see them in action. They stowed away on the side just above the salon windows and were barely noticable. When deployed I imgine they stuck out 10' behond the side of the boat.

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SteveE
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1986 4550 "Synergy"
La Conner, WA
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