Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Danforth exits compass business

Danforth exits compass business 09 Jan 2010 03:24 #1

  • joeydiver
  • joeydiver's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Elite Member
  • Elite Member
  • Posts: 715
  • Thank you received: 0
Credit to PKROGH for this, a link from the www.navgear.com post he posted a few days ago. I found it very interesting - imagine a day when compasses are obsolete?

http://www.threesheetsnw.com/blog/archives/7140

Joey

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2007 Discovery 246
5.0L MPI BRAVO III
The "BAY-BEA"

Danforth exits compass business 09 Jan 2010 04:50 #2

  • pkrogh
  • pkrogh's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Premium Member
  • Premium Member
  • Posts: 388
  • Thank you received: 0
I'm a bit surprised at the decision to stop the Loran C service. With it gone, all "coastal" navigation will have is GPS. All it will take is a major solar flare and GPS won't be available.

Using both GPS and Loran C a mariner can find his location within a couple of yards. That's pretty hard to do with either system alone.

Yep, it's pretty hard to imagine life without a quality compass on board. A good compass, current charts and the necessary knowledge will getcha there!! Batteries not required.

Pete

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

"KROGHS NEST"
1983 Trophy 2260, '93 VP 250-A/SPA
Nordland , Washington, USA

Danforth exits compass business 09 Jan 2010 12:56 #3

  • ColonyCove
  • ColonyCove's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
Compass doesn't work well on my boat because of my magnetic personality.

Anyway, Danforth is making this business decision for reasons of their own, but they are far from a monopoly in world compass manufacturers. They will be around and readily available for a long time, albeit made in China.

Safe and Happy Boating!
ColonyCove

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Danforth exits compass business 10 Jan 2010 08:03 #4

  • myflies
  • myflies's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Elite Member
  • Elite Member
  • Posts: 673
  • Thank you received: 9

pkrogh;402666 wrote: Using both GPS and Loran C a mariner can find his location within a couple of yards. That's pretty hard to do with either system alone.


I disagree with the portion of Pete's response regarding accuracy. I only have GPS aboard my boat and don't seem to have problems locating most all of the 120 anchors used for Seafair.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Danforth exits compass business 10 Jan 2010 16:55 #5

  • kthoennes
  • kthoennes's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 185
  • Thank you received: 0
And now with cellular phone "GPS" (which of course isn't true GPS in the typical sense, it triangulates on cell towers) even if the satellites do fall out of the sky there's the cell system as a back up, for a least the more highly populated coastal areas with strong enough cell towers. Yep, less and less of a justification for those old quaint spinning compasses.

(I just added "Verizon Navigator" to my phone. Still has a long way to go before I'd ever use it on the boat, but it was surprisingly accurate on the streets.)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

1995 Bayliner Capri Cuddy 1952 (the little boat)
1983 Carver 32 Aft Cabin (the big boat)
Lewis & Clark Marina, Yankton, South Dakota

Danforth exits compass business 11 Jan 2010 01:08 #6

  • Vitnary
  • Vitnary's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Junior Member
  • Junior Member
  • Posts: 95
  • Thank you received: 0
I think it was the Chinese who discovered the compass, no?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Danforth exits compass business 11 Jan 2010 08:49 #7

  • ChancesAre
  • ChancesAre's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
magnetic, and radar that talks to the compass and GPS. And I also have up to date charts and all the notices to mariners and a bag of pencils, a sharpener and erasers, dividers, protractors, parallel rules, triangles, a good clock with a second hand, and a whole bunch of other old-fashioned stuff that I actually know how to use.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Danforth exits compass business 11 Jan 2010 09:22 #8

  • pkrogh
  • pkrogh's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Premium Member
  • Premium Member
  • Posts: 388
  • Thank you received: 0

ChancesAre;403539 wrote: magnetic, and radar that talks to the compass and GPS. And I also have up to date charts and all the notices to mariners and a bag of pencils, a sharpener and erasers, dividers, protractors, parallel rules, triangles, a good clock with a second hand, and a whole bunch of other old-fashioned stuff that I actually know how to use.


And you still have room for you on the boat????:D

Pete

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

"KROGHS NEST"
1983 Trophy 2260, '93 VP 250-A/SPA
Nordland , Washington, USA

Danforth exits compass business 11 Jan 2010 18:16 #9

  • ChancesAre
  • ChancesAre's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
small brief case that stores at the helm except for the charts. It isn't an issue. I normally only keep the chart for the local area aboard and I keep all the rest and the Coast Pilot at home. If I'm going out of the local area, I take the necessary charts to the boat and if it is unfamiliar or tricky, I'll take the Coast Pilot along as well. My wife isn't skillful enough to keep a plot but she can log lat and lon and we try to keep it logged fairly frequently when we're going far afield. So, even if you don't have a plot and haven't been maintaining dead reckoning, you can at least start a plot from your last logged position and pretty quickly be able to navigate the old fashioned way.

Most of the time, we're just poking around the local area and I and most other people I know do that the way we drive to the store; navigating by use of the Mk. 1 A 1 Eyeball. That said, even in familiar local waters all you have to do is get caught one time by heavy rain, low clouds, heavy fog, or darkness so that you can no longer orient yourself visually, and you'll take navigation VERY seriously.

I fully expect the chartplotter to never fail but I know it can and I know that I could have an electrical failure that would render it in-op. The backup is a Furuno differential GPS, not a chartplotter, so I have to be able to translate lat and lon to a position and course on a chart, otherwise lat and lon are meaningless. And if you don't know where you are, being able to orient yourself with the compass is pretty much meaningless even if you have general knowledge of the area.

That said, I boat in some relatively demanding waters. Once I get more than about twenty miles in any direction from Juneau, I am in big, cold water, often in bad weather, surrounded by wilderness, and I may go hours or even days without seeing or hearing another boat. If you go into that water, the odds are very good that is the last thing you'll ever do and even on the islands, you'd best be well equipped because you are not at the top of the food chain there.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Danforth exits compass business 11 Jan 2010 18:23 #10

  • Go Aweigh2452
  • Go Aweigh2452's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Platinum Member
  • Olalla, WA
  • Posts: 8013
  • Thank you received: 534

kthoennes;403251 wrote: And now with cellular phone "GPS" (which of course isn't true GPS in the typical sense, it triangulates on cell towers) even if the satellites do fall out of the sky there's the cell system as a back up,


Not if you have the IPhone 3Gs... it has GPS built in and is just as accurate as your boats GPS...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Doug ;}
MMSI: 338068776
"Go Aweigh to" Photos < click on red letters... 2001 Bayliner 2452 w/6.2 HO (paid for)


[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Page:
  • 1
Moderators: JeffwAlaskanmutt
Time to create page: 0.109 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum