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TOPIC: So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday....

So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 00:18 #1

  • tdcooper99
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Heartbreaking... I'm new to this game, only been a saltwater boater since last summer, and thought I'd try my hand at prawning/shrimping before the Canadian commercial season opens on May 11... ie. before a couple of private traps have no chance against the thousands of commercial pots that will be going down very soon. So spent a few hundred bucks to set myself up with 2 pots and the sundries to go along with them.

Anyway, I believe I did everything right as far as pot setup goes. End of the rope was a small 1.5lb anchor, around 8 ft along was pot #1, then pot #2 around 50 ft after that, then another 5 lb weight with the rest of the line up to the buoys. Used a small bullet shaped crab buoy around 6 ft from the end of the line then a size a1 round polyform. Pots themselves were standard round 30", to which I had added 15lbs each of lead weight to counteract current.

Destination was Saturna Island, one of the closest Gulf Islands to Point Roberts WA marina where my home port is... Prawn season is open in Canadian waters. Studied my charts, took into account all the advice I've been reading about depth, structure, slack tide times etc etc... and off I went. Dropped my pots around the West side of East Point , close to Fiddlers Cove, not as far in a Narvaez Bay.... planned for the late 200's of depth, but in the end dropped them in around 230ft of water. My goal if I am perfectly honest, wasn't so much to catch a limit of prawns as to just actually do a prepare, deploy & retrieve successfully so I at least had done it and was comfortable with the process. So I wasn't too bothered about the slightly shallower than optimal depth. So, pots in, we headed over to Shallow Bay, Sucia to have lunch and explore a bit while the pots soaked.

I timed it so we would be retrieving more or less at slack tide so we wouldn't be fighting current while trying to use a pot puller for the first time. I had dropped a waypoint, so I knew exactly where to expect the buoy. Could I find it? Could I f*ck. It was calm seas... not glass... but no chop either. A bright orange buoy would have been hard to miss. I spent 45 minutes moving in ever larger circles, but honestly I knew it was a done deal.... I had f*cked it up somehow on my very first try.

A guy I trust who has done this for 40 years tells me given everything I did to prepare, that it's most likely the gear got nicked. I guess I'm a naive Canadian, but I still find that hard to believe that this is the "most likely" explanation. It was not at all busy out there yesterday... very few small private pleasure boats out. The pots were only down maybe 3 hours... so it just seems the chances of someone happening upon them, and that someone being inclined to nick them is small but I guess it could happen. Maybe in the height of the summer on a really nice day, but whatever. I think there is a chance my gear slid down into deeper water, and my buoys were either not large enough to float and they got pulled under... or they were and the whole lot floated away. I do find it hard to believe that at least 50-60 lbs of gear was able to slide and/or float away.

Anyway, I know pretty much EVERYONE that's crabbed or prawned has lost traps for all of the reasons people lose traps... it a small consolation I guess. Just wanted to vent a little.... woke up so pissed off this morning, know what I did? Drove my a$$ down to Bellingham and re-geared up. Hurts the wallet a bit... and the pride.... but I'm a "get back on my horse and ride" kind of guy so I figure if I get even 1 damn prawn before May 11 I'll be somewhat vindicated B) Hoping to head out again this week at least once and try again. I've got a new spot pegged out.... but if anyone knows Saturna and cares to shoot me a PM as to a decent spot I'd sure appreciate it.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 00:31 #2

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Couple things.
230 feet deep, but how long was your line? Not enough and it could have floated, Too much floating line and it could have gotten cut by a passing boat (in any type of shipping or ferry lanes?)
Did you wait around once you tossed them to make sure they hit bottom? If you tossed it on a steep slope underwater currents could drag it off target.

It is bad enough with people stealing and or pulling pots here most shrimpers carry guns.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 00:31 #3

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Stolen maybe. Around that area the currents can be very strong. Not sure what the exact tides were like at that spot, but this past weekend the tides were almost as big as they get on Southern Vancouver Island at close to 10ft depth change. Currents would also be very strong. It's very likely that your gear got sucked into deeper water and with all the weight the floats sunk. Even with the big weights, the current can push those traps along rapidly.

Next time I'd do it on a day where there is very little tide change.

If you had your name on your gear you may get lucky and someone will find it.

www.tides4fishing.com/ca/british-columbia/sidney

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 00:38 #4

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Sorry things went so poorly for you. I have lost gear as well. Most of the time it gets as you say, "nicked." I finally resorted to using multiple bullet floats with the name of the boat, my name, and cell phone number with indelible marker on each float. Now I think tagging the traps the same way may be a good idea. Last summer or two when a trap disappeared, we waited at the boat ramp for the weekend fishermen to come in. Sure enough one of my traps was in someone else's boat. When asked that they hand it over they wanted to argue about it until I suggested they call the phone number on the float and see who's cell phone would ring as I was pulling my phone from a pocket. They handed it over at that point. Wish I could always track them down that easily. I still remember when you could leave your traps overnight or even a couple of days and no one would even dream of bothering them. Sigh, those days are gone my friend. Wish you better success the next time.


Greg

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 00:40 #5

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tdcooper99 wrote: Used a small bullet shaped crab buoy around 6 ft from the end of the line then a size a1 round polyform. Pots themselves were standard round 30", to which I had added 15lbs each of lead weight to counteract current.


Im no expert but I've allways tossed in around 20 extra feet with a clip weight attached around half the total depth to make sure the buoy(s) can't float my gear when the tide comes up. My buoys will float my gear. Yours may still be there if you go back at low tide maybe.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 01:21 #6

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Two weekends ago was prawning up around Tent Island, Number ! rule up there, Is don't leave your set unattended. Either current or what ever will get you. Especially on weekends. Ted

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 02:03 #7

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Alaskanmutt wrote: Couple things.
230 feet deep, but how long was your line? Not enough and it could have floated, Too much floating line and it could have gotten cut by a passing boat (in any type of shipping or ferry lanes?)
Did you wait around once you tossed them to make sure they hit bottom? If you tossed it on a steep slope underwater currents could drag it off target.


I was using 450 feet of 5/8" leaded line. Part of me hopes I just got it wrong with placement. I was using all leaded line, and no, not in a shipping or ferry lane. Made sure of that. The slope may have been too steep.... it was definitely a slope... but I thought, or maybe naively hoped, that the weight and anchor I included in the line would counteract that.

TenMile wrote: Stolen maybe. Around that area the currents can be very strong. Not sure what the exact tides were like at that spot, but this past weekend the tides were almost as big as they get on Southern Vancouver Island at close to 10ft depth change. Currents would also be very strong. It's very likely that your gear got sucked into deeper water and with all the weight the floats sunk. Even with the big weights, the current can push those traps along rapidly.

Next time I'd do it on a day where there is very little tide change.

If you had your name on your gear you may get lucky and someone will find it.

www.tides4fishing.com/ca/british-columbia/sidney


Great website... the Sidney tides would have been similar I expect, I used this link, but very close: http://www.tides4fishing.com/ca/british-columbia/narvaez-bay . I think you're right, bad placement and the traps got pulled deeper. I did try to time things on either side of the slack to minimise it, but who knows.

builderdude wrote:

tdcooper99 wrote: Used a small bullet shaped crab buoy around 6 ft from the end of the line then a size a1 round polyform. Pots themselves were standard round 30", to which I had added 15lbs each of lead weight to counteract current.


Im no expert but I've allways tossed in around 20 extra feet with a clip weight attached around half the total depth to make sure the buoy(s) can't float my gear when the tide comes up. My buoys will float my gear. Yours may still be there if you go back at low tide maybe.


Sadly, I was retrieving at pretty much the lower of the slack tides... so if they weren't visible then, no hope really.

Mr. Darcy wrote: Sorry things went so poorly for you. I have lost gear as well. Most of the time it gets as you say, "nicked."
Greg


Sorry, spent 17 years in old blighty... some of the terminology has stuck :P

Anyway, thanks all for the encouragement. I'm hoping to head out again this week at some point weather permitting. We'll see if I can get it right this time. And I'll be watching them like a hawk this time... :evil:

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 02:48 #8

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Probably not enough weight to handle the current, you need a lot of extra line to keep the tides from pulling the gear down, and large enough buoys.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 04:29 #9

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Sorry to hear the prawn fishing cost you the gear.
I have had gear fall over the edge so to speak. I was using a Scotsmen buoy/fender which did two things; 1st - it floated the gear and I found it over a mile away and 2nd - it was much easier to spot than those small foam bullet shaped markers. It was an old Scotsman I got used so the potential cost/loss wouldn't have been too bad. Luck for that situation there wasn't much current.
Another thing that has happened to me before with the small bullet shaped float markers; in strong current they can get pulled quite a ways beneath the surface. I too did big circles looking for quite some time looking for it. If it doesn't get dragged away then come back at slack tide and you will find it. That was my experience at Surge Narrows.
The knee jerk reaction is that someone ripped you off but most people on the water are pretty honest folks who can appreciate the price of fishing gear.
With that said, you should draw some evil looking eyes on your crab or prawn float and write "I'M WATCHING YOU!"

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 04:52 #10

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I shrimp just south of you across the border. I also lost my very first shrimp pot including a very nice setup. While we are only allowed one pot per buoy in WA state, we use all the same gear. Since losing the first one, here are a few things I do:

1. With the currents we get (even when it appears to be a slack tide), I use a minimum of ⅓ more 5/16" leaded line than depth. So, with 400' of downline, I never set deeper than 300', and I always set in a 'hole'.

2. I use a 12" 7lb grappling hook on each pot, securely clipped to the end of the loop end of the leaded line, held with a 10' length of poly. I also zip tie the ring to one of the tynes to make sure it stays open.

3. I use a double float on a bottom weighted stick, with a single float on a 20' poly line attached to the bottom loop on the float.

4. I always hang onto the second float until I know the pot is on the bottom and the first float is bobbing on the surface. (I watch the pot drop on my sonar and can see it hit the bottom.)

5. I always pay out the leaded line when setting. I cannot tell you how many times the 400' downline has knotted causing the first float to drop below the surface. Hanging onto the second float makes it a snap to pull it back up, especially with my Scotty pot puller.

I have two 5lb corner leads in each pot, but other than the grappling hook, that is all the weight keeping it on the bottom.

Two other suggestions about your lost gear: Follow the currents to see if it may have drifted; and return to the spot when you can to see if you had a knot and it unraveled. Unlikely you will recover your gear, but with our currents, ya just never know. Good luck.

ADDITION: I just read that you were using a poly ball. At standard inflation, it has 29lbs of buoyancy. However, as it gets drawn down, the pressure squashes it and it begins to lose its buoyancy. EXAMPLE: Any inflated ball at the surface will have half that volume at 33fsw. While the ball can be pressurized, whatever the pressure is, it will lose buoyancy with depth. Traditionally, the 11" balls are used to mark anchorages in shallow water, or they are used as boat fenders. I suggest you use the styrofoam floats because they won't collapse when they get pulled under.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 13:01 #11

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We quit losing gear when we weight the pots to either 22lbs or 37lbs if fishing in a high current area AND Using a leader of 10ft off your float or stick with an A2 buoy. 64lbs of buoyancy. We also sit on our pots and watch them, no theft and you can see if they start to float away. I ALSO RE-TIE ALL KNOTS ON THE POT FROM THE FACTORY, ZIP TIE all knot ENDS AND TAPE THEM. NO MORE LOST GEAR.
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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 13:27 #12

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Sorry lost your traps
If anything people take your crab traps or just empty them for you
Prawn traps are a lot of work to pull-up with out a puller and not a lot of people have them on board.

I lost some prawn traps in the Broughtons put down 2 sets found one that had dragged 1/4 the other gone.
I wasn't surprized when I returned the Tide was flowing pretty good

Crab traps
Once I lost one only to find it a mile away with the float going under the water for 30 seconds at a time Pulling it up I found a shark in it
Another time I approached my trap only to have it suddenly move ten feet away from me just as I was reaching for it
It was a bitch bringing up but I had a nice halibut in it.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 13:49 #13

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Sorry to hear you had your equipment "nicked" as you say. I do some crabbing in the Chesapeake Bay (by law only allowed five pots) and I leave my pots out overnight all the time. So far I have been lucky but a couple of time they have floated several hundred yards farther then where I placed them. I have caught turtles that try to steal my traps all the time, they get in them and just start to swim away. Strong little suckers.
Good luck on your next trip.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 16:40 #14

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All good advice, and I appreciate all your responses. My own personal thoughts on the theft issue were kind of along the same lines as Sea Q.... there wasn't very much pleasure boat traffic in the area on Sunday.... I think we saw maybe 2 or 3 others off in the distance, and none in the area we had dropped the gear in. The pots were damn heavy with extra weight .... I had 2 on one line, with extra weight before and after the pots... so pulling them up without a puller would have been a real b*tch...

I am now thinking that my buoys were too small and that they got sucked under in the current. Given i dropped them in relatively shallow water for prawning (around 230 ft) with 450 of rope, there was plenty of scope for them to be pulled under and be stuck in the current under the surface... maybe 50ft or more, who knows? I am thinking I should go out and check and see if they've popped up! I know slack tide would be best... but is there a point before or after high/low slack where the current will be the lowest as well? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but as I said, I'm new to saltwater boating and I had previously assumed that as close to low slack as possible would be the best time to retrieve. I wonder if I was circling right above my pots all along!

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 16:52 #15

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tdcooper99 wrote: All good advice, and I appreciate all your responses. My own personal thoughts on the theft issue were kind of along the same lines as Sea Q.... there wasn't very much pleasure boat traffic in the area on Sunday.... I think we saw maybe 2 or 3 others off in the distance, and none in the area we had dropped the gear in. The pots were damn heavy with extra weight .... I had 2 on one line, with extra weight before and after the pots... so pulling them up without a puller would have been a real b*tch...

I am now thinking that my buoys were too small and that they got sucked under in the current. Given i dropped them in relatively shallow water for prawning (around 230 ft) with 450 of rope, there was plenty of scope for them to be pulled under and be stuck in the current under the surface... maybe 50ft or more, who knows? I am thinking I should go out and check and see if they've popped up! I know slack tide would be best... but is there a point before or after high/low slack where the current will be the lowest as well? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but as I said, I'm new to saltwater boating and I had previously assumed that as close to low slack as possible would be the best time to retrieve. I wonder if I was circling right above my pots all along!


With 450' of line in a 230' depth, either slack tide - high or low - will work. Also, again, follow the current both ways of where you dropped them, and pay attention to your bottom to see if there are any slopes or holes in the area. If there is, how deep are they, and do you have enough line to let the floats be seen at those spots during slack tide? I lost a crab pot in the current in 200' of water with 300' of line, but 2 days later, while cruising out to go fishing, it was on the surface. There was crab in it, but it was on a Tuesday, and crabbing in WA is closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays throughout the season, so I tossed them back. I'm just thankful I retrieved my pot and line.

As to how close to slack tide, it depends on the size of the tide, and the structures in the area. I would go out an hour before up to an hour after.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 16:58 #16

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aluxury1 wrote: We quit losing gear when we weight the pots to either 22lbs or 37lbs if fishing in a high current area AND Using a leader of 10ft off your float or stick with an A2 buoy. 64lbs of buoyancy. We also sit on our pots and watch them, no theft and you can see if they start to float away. I ALSO RE-TIE ALL KNOTS ON THE POT FROM THE FACTORY, ZIP TIE all knot ENDS AND TAPE THEM. NO MORE LOST GEAR.


Is this what you mean about the 10' leader? Everything under water in the diagram below is what I am planning for my next attempt... each pot is around 25lbs, with around 50' of line separating them. 450' of leaded rope, maximum 300' of water.

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Tyson, Ackerley, Sidney & Gene
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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 17:27 #17

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Thanks for the diagram. I was wondering why it cost $200-$300 for a couple of pots. I use Crab pots in VA and we can buy a lot of pots for that kind of money. But here we use one pot, one buoy and about 30' of rope. We are required to put out names on them and a part of our license #. Good luck it looks lit it should work ok.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 17:45 #18

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Apurpura wrote: Thanks for the diagram. I was wondering why it cost $200-$300 for a couple of pots. I use Crab pots in VA and we can buy a lot of pots for that kind of money. But here we use one pot, one buoy and about 30' of rope. We are required to put out names on them and a part of our license #. Good luck it looks lit it should work ok.


Well... you can certainly go cheaper on the pots.... but I chose this time to go with heavy-duty ones so I don't need to fool around tying additional weights on. The traps alone weigh 25lbs each. The rest... buoys, rope etc are pretty standard cost I think. Also, you're talking about crab pots... I think I spent maybe $100 total on my crab pot setup... much less expensive hobby!

This is what I spent yesterday replacing my shrimp gear:

2 x Pots: $199.90
2 x 3lb grappling anchors: $21.70
450ft 5/8" leaded rope: $51.95
Polyform LD-2 Buoy (low drag buoy): $43.45
6 x Snap clips: $4.92
2 x Scotty Bait pots: $6.50

Total: $328.42 + tax.

So yeah, IT SUCKS losing gear... and if they get lost again any time soon I won't be able to justify replacing them.... got far too many more important things on the boat that should take priority, like converting to hydraulic steering B)

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 17:51 #19

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Yes your diagram is right, the only thing is we have 1 pot per line, and the faster the current the more extra line you want. We fish 250 with 400ft of line. You can also go with 15ft leader. Or put them down in calmer water or fish an hour before and an hour after the tide change. I also prefer the pot to float than the floats to go under. We made 5ft sticks with 2 yellow buoys on them, then the leader to the A-2. When the sticks go down, you know its running hard, the A-2 will float the pot. Looking again at your drawing, I'm not sure the anchor tied to the float line would keep a pot in place, its likely being lifted by the tension on that line, maybe just the 1 anchor.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 19:22 #20

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tdcooper99 wrote:

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I have a few comments on your set up. Here's a drawing for reference.




Your grappling hooks are very small for any kind of current, and your middle grappling hook is absolutely useless, because as soon as you get any tug on the up-line, it will swing free.

If you really want to streamline your set up, remove both grappling hooks in place of a heavy weight, like a truck wheel drum or a heavy length of big chain, and place it between the up-line and the first pot where your grappling hook is. Now the tide can change, and your pots will remain where they were set.

I would also decrease the size of your float so it will sink in bigger currents, and I'd switch them to the sealed styrofoam ones designed for this use.

I would continue to use the leader, but I would change it so the bigger float is attached to the leaded line, and the second float is attached to the leader. Now your leaded line is supported by the bigger float, and the second float will always remain on the surface.

As it stands, you have no security in the event the tide changes. So, if you set one way, when it changes, your big float will lift your grappling hook and drag your pots around the other way even with 25lbs in each pot. Remember, that big A2 has lift, but it also has a ton of drag in the wind and current, so it could easily lift both pots. That means your end grappling hook had better hold, ...but at 3lbs, it won't.

IMHO, I would rather sink my float until slack tide, than have everything float off into places unknown and become a hazard to navigation.

I use a 9lb grappling hook connected to the leaded line, not the pot. In a strong current, the hook will hold, the pot will lift and swing with the current, and gently reset. If I had more weight in the pot, the force of current on the leaded line would likely just flip the pot over as it swung.

As to using a second single buoy, many times I have arrived to see only the smaller float on the surface because the other one has been sucked down. But even in the biggest current, the smaller float has always been on the surface.

If I were to make any change, it would be to add a piece of chain to the grappling hook to help it stay set.

If I lived in Canada again, I could go back to using two pots on one line, and I'd be doing it the other way. While I could do that now, I like that the pot can gently reset itself.

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"B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
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Last Edit: by CptCrunchie.

So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 21:18 #21

  • tdcooper99
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CptCrunchie wrote:
I use a 9lb grappling hook connected to the leaded line, not the pot. In a strong current, the hook will hold, the pot will lift and swing with the current, and gently reset. If I had more weight in the pot, the force of current on the leaded line would likely just flip the pot over as it swung.


Wow, so much detailed advice from everyone. Thanks again! One question for you CptCrunchie, one thing I've been told repeatedly by different folks is that if the trap is moving (ie. being bounced up and down by the buoy) that the prawns will avoid it.... but your setup suggests that this is fine, a gentle bounce doesn't hurt anything?

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 02 May 2017 23:17 #22

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tdcooper99 wrote:

CptCrunchie wrote:
I use a 9lb grappling hook connected to the leaded line, not the pot. In a strong current, the hook will hold, the pot will lift and swing with the current, and gently reset. If I had more weight in the pot, the force of current on the leaded line would likely just flip the pot over as it swung.


Wow, so much detailed advice from everyone. Thanks again! One question for you CptCrunchie, one thing I've been told repeatedly by different folks is that if the trap is moving (ie. being bounced up and down by the buoy) that the prawns will avoid it.... but your setup suggests that this is fine, a gentle bounce doesn't hurt anything?


I usually don't need to drop two pots, because in just over an hour I limit out with each, ....but it's nice to take out the bigger ones. Also, I have enough line between the pot and where the leaded line meets the hook line that I doubt the pot moves. Only when the current really bucks up would it lift, because the double float gets sucked down first. But if it does move, it doesn't drag.

I would use the other method if I was leaving them in overnight, ....but then I risk piracy.

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"B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
MMSI: 367637220
HAM: KE7TTR
TDI tech diver
BoD, North Olympic Peninsula Puget Sound Anglers, Sequim, WA
Kevin

So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 03 May 2017 04:51 #23

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I'm basically a newb at the shrimp set up also. Using the heavy Ladner pots, and bought 4 of the weighted poles with the dual floats on them. Intend on fishing just off Edmonds with a 8' tide change at 300'. 400' of leaded line on each.
Couple things I dont get:
1st is this pole set up - they have a line on them that is secured at the bottom, but the loop is long enough to go over the top of the pole. Am I supposed to put my styrofoam on the pole, then just slip the loop over the top of the pole? That seems to me like the pole is going to slide right down to the bottom when I drop it in the water....I'm obviously missing something really darn simple here.....
2nd - I'm debating if I should just attach my leaded line straight to the pole and call it good. Or should I rig up a second line as shown in the previous posts? I dont intend to get into the oft debated float it or sink it (I'd rather be able to retrive my gear though), but if I do attach straight to the pole, am I missing some other dynamic? I did make up some 10' poly strands with 4 small (6") styro floats on them - really dont have any idea why, I was basically blundering around in the store finding things to buy and put together.....it happens......I thought maybe I'd also attach those to the bottom of the pole, but in retrospect, it doesnt appear that they would do anything except provide a bit of lift if the pot moved.
I do intend to sit on the pots as much as possible.

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So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 03 May 2017 05:35 #24

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JThiessen wrote: 1st is this pole set up - they have a line on them that is secured at the bottom, but the loop is long enough to go over the top of the pole. Am I supposed to put my styrofoam on the pole, then just slip the loop over the top of the pole? That seems to me like the pole is going to slide right down to the bottom when I drop it in the water....I'm obviously missing something really darn simple here.....


The line comes up from the bottom, through the plastic rod twice, then up over both floats and the loop end slides down over the end of the pole. Then you slide as much line back through the two holes to tighten it down. There should be a lead weight on the bottom of the pole as well, and it slips inside it too. Once the leaded line is connected, the line holds the floats to the pole so they can't slip off.

JThiessen wrote: 2nd - I'm debating if I should just attach my leaded line straight to the pole and call it good. Or should I rig up a second line as shown in the previous posts? I dont intend to get into the oft debated float it or sink it (I'd rather be able to retrive my gear though), but if I do attach straight to the pole, am I missing some other dynamic? I did make up some 10' poly strands with 4 small (6") styro floats on them - really dont have any idea why, I was basically blundering around in the store finding things to buy and put together.....it happens......I thought maybe I'd also attach those to the bottom of the pole, but in retrospect, it doesnt appear that they would do anything except provide a bit of lift if the pot moved.
I do intend to sit on the pots as much as possible.


I don't quite understand your 2nd, but here's the way I set up. Notice there are only 2 points where the lines are connected, and that's on each end of the leaded line.


The leaded line connects to the the bottom loop of the main float, as does the end of the line from the second float.

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"B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
MMSI: 367637220
HAM: KE7TTR
TDI tech diver
BoD, North Olympic Peninsula Puget Sound Anglers, Sequim, WA
Kevin
Last Edit: by CptCrunchie.

So I "lost" my prawning gear yesterday.... 03 May 2017 14:46 #25

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You will have minimal to moderate tidal flow in front of Edmonds. What is being discussed above is happening in extreme high current areas like the San Juans, Eastern bank, and channel areas. Hat Island area can be tricky too. Edmonds and Hood canal are much easier to fish, and we only put 15lbs in a 7 lb pot. I always use 400ft 5/16 lead line. I never fish deeper than 320. Edmonds and Browns bay we did well at 230 - 260ft. The faster the water the shallower we fish.

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