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TOPIC: Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 16 Aug 2016 23:44 #1

  • shiverfix
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I’ve got a 1993 Cuddy Classic 1952 that I’m trying to make more fishing friendly. Eventually I plan on getting a fishing boat, but I would like to use this one for at least another four years.

Over the last couple of years I have discovered that the biggest necessity was a bow mount trolling motor. Trying to fine tune maneuver with the big engine was frustrating to say the least. Doing research on projects was what brought me to BOC in the first place, and it has been a great resource. However, while I found a few postings on mounting a trolling motor to the bow of a Capri, I didn’t find a lot on mounting a trolling motor on the bow of a Cuddy. That is why I wanted to post here, so someone else can see what I did and maybe help them.

The two biggest issues with mounting on a cuddy are the fact that the bow isn’t flat, and there is a railing. I decided it would be easiest to mount on a quick release plate.
www.basspro.com/Minn-Kota-Composite-Quic...ckets/product/73466/
This would allow me to raise the motor up enough to clear the cabin deck, and allow me to remove the motor for transport and storage. After lining up the motor a few different ways, the best option ended up being right where the cleat was. This worked out fine (at first) because I could use the hole from the cleat for one of the mounting bolts. I then drilled 3 more holes. Let me jump ahead here and explain where I went wrong. While testing the placement of the motor, I paid attention to the deck, the railing where the motor head would be when not in the water, and the distance in front of the bow so the shaft would clear. What I didn’t pay attention to was the fact that the railing posts are angled, so once I had it all mounted the motor head was impeded by the front railing post. So, first lesson to learn from me, put the railing back on and test dropping the motor into position before drilling holes. Luckily, I could use two of the holes so I only needed to drill two more. I filled the extra holes with a piece of dowel and resin.

Original Hole Placement


Final Hole Placement


To mount the quick release plate, I used stainless bolts with locking nuts, threaded through stainless spacers. I used rubber washers between the stainless washer and the spacer. Since the cleat was originally mounted here, there is already reinforcement under the deck, but I used big washers inside the cabin to disperse the strain on the deck.

The motor mounts onto the larger piece of the quick release. For the two bolts in the front I fashioned a pair of rubber feet which rest on the deck when the motor is mounted. This gives a little more resistance to the torque of the motor putting pressure on the 4 mountings on the boat. Thankfully, the pull release sat high enough to clear the bow light. One more for the checklist if you are using my mistakes as a guide!





The next issue is the railing. Since I am doing this on an old boat that doesn’t have much resale value, I am more willing to do permanent damage, like holes and railing modification. I wanted to be able to have a section of railing that I could quickly remove, but could also reconnect. I marked the railing in the middle point of the front two posts, and cut the railing with an angle grinder. I then drilled a hole in the railing mount for a stainless bolt and wing nut. I have since purchased quick release pins like used for the Bimini which I am going to try to use.






Railing On


Railing Off



The last step was to drill a hole for the power plug and run the wires from the plug to the battery. I had originally cut out the foam under the passenger back to backs and glassed in a box there, but changed my mind and mounted battery boxes in the cabin under the cushion. This helps even the weight out and keep the bow down. Sorry, no pics of the batteries. I put in two deep cells in parallel.

Hopefully if someone is trying to figure out how to mount a trolling motor on a Cuddy, this will give them some ideas, and some pitfalls to watch out for.

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1993 Bayliner Classic Cuddy 1952
Colorado

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 16 Aug 2016 23:59 #2

  • montagc
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Nice write up! What kind of fishing do you do? Is the foot pedal at the helm?

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88 Capri 2150 305 OMC
91 and 93 Yamaha Waverunner III 650
Cincinnati, OH

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 17 Aug 2016 02:22 #3

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Thanks montagc! We have some warm water fishing around along the front range, a couple of good smallmouth and walleye reservoirs. Then in the mountains some great trout lakes.

I went with the ipilot, so no foot pedal to wire up. I was able to get a used one that was only a season old and barely used for half of new.

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1993 Bayliner Classic Cuddy 1952
Colorado

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 17 Aug 2016 19:03 #4

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Very cool. Easily deployed from the hatch, or does it automatically stow and deploy?

Are you trolling most of the time?

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88 Capri 2150 305 OMC
91 and 93 Yamaha Waverunner III 650
Cincinnati, OH

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 17 Aug 2016 19:38 #5

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This picture is not of my boat, but it is the same model. It has the passthrough windshield. I just jump up onto the cabin and drop the motor down, then jump back down into the cockpit. I would have loved the auto deploy motor, but it is significantly more expensive.

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Now that I have the trolling motor, when I am fishing, I have it down most of the time. I use the anchor lock feature a lot. The motor will stay within 5ft of the gps coordinate of where are when you push the button. This is great for jigging over structure or holding steady to cast into a specific area.

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1993 Bayliner Classic Cuddy 1952
Colorado

Bow mount trolling motor on Classic Cuddy 18 Aug 2016 00:51 #6

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Thanks For answering All my silly questions! Looks like you have it dialed in nicely. I saw your pics in the other thread. You definitely enjoy that boat! The ocean pics are awesome.
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88 Capri 2150 305 OMC
91 and 93 Yamaha Waverunner III 650
Cincinnati, OH
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