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TOPIC: I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric.

I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 17:37 #51

  • 88fourwinns
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very interesting project!
In a boat big enough, it would be interesting to think about a diesel/electric system where the boat would be set up like old school submarines, or a locomotive, the diesel powerplant just re-charges the batteries and the electric system does all the propulsion. The difference being that the diesel engine would not have to be so large and heavy, but the batteries might make up for that. It would be interesting to see an engineering and cost analysis to see where the break even point is, if that is feasible.....
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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:19 #52

  • Norton Rider
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I'm more interested in these projects from a battery technology standpoint. Eventually I'd love to replace the battery banks on my boat with lighter, more compact ones. I'm not comfortable with the safety aspects of some of the types of lithium-ion batteries; but there are some chemistries that appear to be safe enough to use on a boat.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:32 #53

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canoel wrote: With the wide torque curve that an electric motor has, I wonder about your next project if you have considered going with a straight shaft?
Without the gearing, etc, it may be more efficient.


Although electric motors will typically make more or max torque at revolution one, the power or horse power is not made until RPM's are in the thousands. Some electric motors make their max power at 10,000 RPM. A direct drive is inefficient without gear reduction because too much load is put on the motor. My first conversion was on a 22ft pontoon boat. I did a direct mount to the drive shaft on an outboard motor. It tends to over heat quickly because it's air cooled and the motor does not spin fast enough to make ample power and also there is not enough air being blown around too cool the motor because it's not spinning fast enough. Much like their ICE counterparts, a 2 to 1 gear reduction seems to work nicely. If the motor is a high RPM motor, as much as 4 to 1 reduction may be necessary. In short, you still need to make horse power. All the torque in the world won't help if your not making horse power. I did notice, however, that low speed maneuvering responds quick and in the case of the speed boat, it seems to get to plane very quickly. Thank you for the interest.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:36 #54

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88fourwinns wrote: very interesting project!
In a boat big enough, it would be interesting to think about a diesel/electric system where the boat would be set up like old school submarines, or a locomotive, the diesel powerplant just re-charges the batteries and the electric system does all the propulsion. The difference being that the diesel engine would not have to be so large and heavy, but the batteries might make up for that. It would be interesting to see an engineering and cost analysis to see where the break even point is, if that is feasible.....


Thank you. I have noticed a trend by some of the electric marine motor manufacturer to move toward a hybrid system and I agree with you. This might be the way to get the electric marine industry a jump start. Good observation on your part.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:40 #55

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Norton Rider wrote: I'm more interested in these projects from a battery technology standpoint. Eventually I'd love to replace the battery banks on my boat with lighter, more compact ones. I'm not comfortable with the safety aspects of some of the types of lithium-ion batteries; but there are some chemistries that appear to be safe enough to use on a boat.


Lithium-Ion is your lightest of all the chemistries. That is the main reason I went that way. I hear that LifePO4 are a bit more stable.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:41 #56

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smasterson2 wrote:

88fourwinns wrote: very interesting project!
In a boat big enough, it would be interesting to think about a diesel/electric system where the boat would be set up like old school submarines, or a locomotive, the diesel powerplant just re-charges the batteries and the electric system does all the propulsion. The difference being that the diesel engine would not have to be so large and heavy, but the batteries might make up for that. It would be interesting to see an engineering and cost analysis to see where the break even point is, if that is feasible.....


Thank you. I have noticed a trend by some of the electric marine motor manufacturer to move toward a hybrid system and I agree with you. This might be the way to get the electric marine industry a jump start. Good observation on your part.




Passagemaker Magazine did such a thing in an in-depth, 2-part article. The bottom line was that there are too many conversion losses along the way and it is much more efficient to turn props directly with a diesel engine.

Remember, that a hybrid boat does not have the ability to regenerate energy like a hybrid car when it brakes. Maybe some day they will figure out a way to harness the rolling and pitching motion and regenerate this energy into electrical power.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:45 #57

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Norton Rider wrote:

smasterson2 wrote:

88fourwinns wrote: very interesting project!
In a boat big enough, it would be interesting to think about a diesel/electric system where the boat would be set up like old school submarines, or a locomotive, the diesel powerplant just re-charges the batteries and the electric system does all the propulsion. The difference being that the diesel engine would not have to be so large and heavy, but the batteries might make up for that. It would be interesting to see an engineering and cost analysis to see where the break even point is, if that is feasible.....


Thank you. I have noticed a trend by some of the electric marine motor manufacturer to move toward a hybrid system and I agree with you. This might be the way to get the electric marine industry a jump start. Good observation on your part.




Passagemaker Magazine did such a thing in an in-depth, 2-part article. The bottom line was that there are too many conversion losses along the way and it is much more efficient to turn props directly with a diesel engine.

Remember, that a hybrid boat does not have the ability to regenerate energy like a hybrid car when it brakes. Maybe some day they will figure out a way to harness the rolling and pitching motion and regenerate this energy into electrical power.


Thanks for the tip, I'll check it out.

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I finished converting my 2016 Bayliner 175 Bowrider to All Electric. 16 Aug 2016 18:54 #58

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smasterson2 wrote:

Norton Rider wrote: I'm more interested in these projects from a battery technology standpoint. Eventually I'd love to replace the battery banks on my boat with lighter, more compact ones. I'm not comfortable with the safety aspects of some of the types of lithium-ion batteries; but there are some chemistries that appear to be safe enough to use on a boat.


Lithium-Ion is your lightest of all the chemistries. That is the main reason I went that way. I hear that LifePO4 are a bit more stable.



Agreed, the two Lithium-Ion chemistries that I would even consider on a boat based on thermal runaway characteristics are Lithium Titanate (Li4Ti5O12) and Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4). Based on cost, availability, and energy density LiFePO4 seems the way to go.

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