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TOPIC: The roll over

The roll over 28 Jan 2009 16:54 #1

  • Monterey10
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Over the years, I've written down some of my experiences. You may have seen them posted here before. I hope the new readers enjoy/learn from these experiences:

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When I was young, I worked summers at the local fishing pier. I spent the days launching and retrieving boats and learning a whole lot about fishing from the various old salts that hung out there.

One day, we learned that one of the pier rental boats had gone up on New Brighton beach. Karen the owner of the boat rental and I took the 16' Avon 5 miles down to the coast to retrieve our stranded boat. The plan was to tow the rental boat off the beach before the park rangers came by and made it a state wide emergency.

As we approached the beach, Karen eyed the green waters and said "Closer, get closer". Next thing I knew, the Avon was surfing down a sizable wave. The motor was clear out of the water. The Avon turned sideways and broached. I remember the splash, cold green foaming water, then a dark shadow going over my head. I surfaced and found the Avon upright and full of water, drifting nearby. Quickly, I pulled the heavy Avon away from the beach and pushed it out towards the oncoming waves. I punched through two big waves and lost a little ground. A pause in the sets of waves and I got out a ways. I jumped into the Avon, which was completely full of water and gave the tug on the recoil starter. Our battered Tohatsu engine came to life. I put the sodden motor into gear and punched through the next set of waves, heading out to sea. Situations like this make you a firm believer in your outboard.

During this time, Karen waded ashore with a long tow line and pushed the stricken pier boat into the waves. I gunned the Tohatsu and the pier boat came through the surf without a problem.

On the long tow back the pier, I noticed that with the engine running the water flowed out of the Avon’s one way drain plug. The water in the bottom of the boat had sand, sea shells and bits of kelp . Just like the beach. When we arrived at the pier, the water had drained and my feet had dried.

From what I’ve read, you should always follow a wave into the beach. Never let one sneak up behind you. Another option, would have been to swim the tow line to shore.

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Craig Capitola Village, CA
1988 Bayliner 2556 (BoatAsaurus)
1996 Trophy 2352 (Mystic)

The roll over 31 Jan 2009 05:18 #2

  • mainecoast
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Craig,
I've read a number of your posts tonight. I wouldn't hesitate to be on the ocean anywhere with you. You rock!
T

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[SIGPIC] [/SIGPIC]
1989 2650...an ongoing restoration...but I'm totally clueless...It just happened to be running the day this photo was taken.
Isn't owning a boat always an ongoing restoration?

The roll over 01 Feb 2009 05:16 #3

  • Monterey10
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All it is, is time on the water and a desire to write.

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Craig Capitola Village, CA
1988 Bayliner 2556 (BoatAsaurus)
1996 Trophy 2352 (Mystic)
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